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Discussion Starter #1
I saved a few bucks and got some cheap non hot-dipped galvanized wash tubs. I just noticed the bleach bottle leaked in one of them and ate the galvanized layer completely off. No, I did not put it on the stove, I have a hot-dipped one for that.

a) is this normal?
b) how do you guys transport your bleach?

Mine was in the plastic bottle inside a ziplock.
 

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I don't use bleach. Especially in a cold rinse. Bleach sucks. I can always taste it on the plates and silver. Use boiled hot water, scalding hot. Problem solved. Your welcome.
 

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I believe in bleach if you can taste or smell it your solution is too strong. It is not effective in hot water so I use cold water.

I use plastic tubs like you use at home in your sink. They are cheap, light, available everywhere, they nest and they fit in my kitchen box. When they get stained I throw them out and start over.

I always have rubber gloves in my kit and this helps keep the soap and bleach from drying out your skin.
 

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Try putting a little piece of plastic wrap in between the bottle and the lid to keep it from leaking. Ziploc is a good backup, but it seems like it didn't completely work for you.

I use the previously mention kitchen sink plastic tubs as well, but our group usually uses the large metal tubs. Never seen them rust through, but I'm pretty sure they were the high quality metal tubs.

My bleach bottle leaked once as well and it almost ate through the metal strainer that I use so I could see that happening. It's unfortunate that they don't make a bottle that doesn't leak considering it's a pretty harsh chemical.
 

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I use a Grolsch beer bottle wrapped in duct tape for my bleech. You don't need much....just a few drops per gallon will do it.

If you can taste it on the dishes....you have put in too much.
 

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I tried an aluminum liter bottle and the bleach ate the gasket in a week. The black rubber washer was reduced to goo. I now use the bottles that are sold for camping. The ones with the spout that flips up work well for dispensing drops of bleach. I've had no problem since. No leaks or degradation of the plastic from one season to the next.
 

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Use quats for the sanitizing rinse. Still approved by health departments for commercial kitchens, and they're easy on the hands. Plus they turn the water blue, so you know they were added. I've never noticed a taste. The only downside I can think of is no bleach for emergency water purification if you lose your carried supply for some reason.
http://www.amazon.com/Steramine-Qua...0W09SF6/ref=cm_sw_em_r_dpcod_8uHFvb1RTP8ME_tt
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Streamine! I had forgotten about that stuff.

I've been researching and clorine bleach is just nasty stuff, plus unstable. It also ate the anodization off of some tent stakes in the tub. I can fix the tub with some rustolium, but I won't be transporting bleach bottles around any more. The spill was an accident, usually the bottle travels upright, and has without problem on many trips. It got dropped on its side, probably vented some, and follow that with sitting in the open tub in the heat for a couple days, and it was enough to eat down to bare metal.
 

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Ya, bleach is nasty, but that's why it works. In sunlight, it breaks down to........... salt. and water and oxygen, and some organic byproducts of the nasties it killed.

Air-dried dishes are quite safe when a cold bleach sanitizer is used. Never heated dish water, not gonna start now.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Ah, but the femmes on our trips want clean hands, and what better way to get clean hands than to submerge them in warm soapy dishwater. I'm a guy, feel a less urgent need for clean hands, so I'm willing to make a sacrifice and give up my time at the dish wash table. There are sooo many unexpected synergies in life...
 

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+1 on Steramine. We've used them on many trips and they are very convenient, easy to transport and store. It should be noted that in cold water they don't dissolve very well so I typically dump them in and then wait some time then hand crush them to aid in the process. I've also noticed that bleach is a mild flocculant as well.

As a side note I use 4 hot-dipped metal tubs (4.5 gal I think) for dishes. You can heat any of them, they nest, they don't rust and they're big enough (wide) for almost any dish/pot.
 

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If you are using a 3 or 4 bucket system when doing dishes, you can start warm and soapy and end cold with the bleach, right?
 

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Discussion Starter #14
That's how I did it, and it worked well for cleaning dishes, and making female boaters happy. Just don't spill your bleach bottle.

Now I will do it with Steramine, ordered via amazon prime. I will probably mix in a little heated water to get the temp up around 75F so the tablet will disolve a little quicker. The reason why the final rinse was cold was fuel economy; no reason, per se, that all phases couldn't be hot water, probably that's what your (non female) home dishwasher machine does. Been several decades since I worked a restaurant dish room, but there you use only hot water, almost at steam.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
For future reference:

Behrens has two different galvanized 4.5 gal tubs.

The C17GS is not hot dipped galvanized, and uses some form of silicon sealant to finish the seams. I have never heated mine on a stove, but I'm skeptical as to positive results if I did.

The C17 is hot dipped galvanized, and can be heated on a stove.

The C17 is somewhat larger at the bottom, so C17GS will fit in C17, but not the opposite.

I like galvanized tubs, use them for tons of things besides holding water for dishes.
 
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