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I have had good luck with these throw bags from H20 rescue gear. We have utilized them for each member on a fire department swift water rescue team. It is a little bulkier than the NRS pro, but it is 25' more rope. In my opinion I can throw the H20 better. They also have small gear pouches available that work well for pulleys and prussiks. When rowing my cat with a high back seat, I just slide the throw bag to the side and have no issues. I really like having a bag available with me, in case of out of boat experiences or helping others.

Sharpshooter Throw Bag
 

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Y'all actually throw rope when rafting. I usually just yell "SWIM" and attempt to get a little video of the beatering. Its not like they're gonna float off a waterfall on the Ark.
I enjoy having my kids stand up, then I rock the oars so they fall in and have to scramble back in the boat before the next riffle they think is gonna be a class 3 rapid. However, I've realized I'm been completely too lax about my safety plans in case one of them does fall in mid class 3-4 and needs real help. If I had to drop the oars and stand up to reach for an NRS bag clipped to the frame, then the rest of us would be in trouble. I can see putting the oars under my knees and reaching around my waist to grab the bag and deploy it, so I'm gonna definitely get one of these style bags.
 

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I can see putting the oars under my knees and reaching around my waist to grab the bag and deploy it, so I'm gonna definitely get one of these style bags.
I would suggest that this approach does not fall under best practice. The game changes as soon as a rope is deployed and once deployed, rope management becomes the top priority for the one holding the rope. Trying to manage oars and a rope in a rescue situation is a recipe for disaster and a rope should only be deployed from a boat if absolutely necessary in a legit rescue situation. I will argue that a well-placed throw bag with an appropriate release mechanism (e.g., Fastex buckle) in your cockpit should be easier to deploy than one from a waist belt. Good boat spacing with a dialed-in crew is a far better (and safer) approach for picking up a swimmer than tossing a rope.

Don't get me wrong, quick access to a throw rope is critical; just keep it in the bag until it is truly required.
 

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I would suggest that this approach does not fall under best practice.
Agreed. I've been reading the book "БЕЗОПАСНОСТЬ НА БУРНОЙ ВОДЕ " (Safety in Stormy Water) and just came a across this relevant passage (translated):

When Carrots (Throw Bags) Are Inneficient:
  • If you throw a carrot (throw bag) from a raft or catamaran moving in the stream. It is much more difficult to calculate mentally the trajectories of movement of two objects in an inhomogeneous jet and accurately throw a rescue end to the victim than just pick it up on board.
  • If the victim is unable to take part in their own rescue, such as unconscious, severely injured, stewed in a bad barrel, and disoriented.
  • If the river is too wide or the victim swims under the other bank, far away from you. The length of the targeted throw of a carrot is no more than 15 m, even with excellent training of the rescuer.
  • In canyons with vertical walls, where there is no way to gain a foothold on the shore. Spaskonets simply nowhere to throw.
  • In these cases, other methods of rescue should be used: from the water on a ship or live bait.
 

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Here is a relevant accident report on the AW Accident database regarding non-locking carabiners:

 
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