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YO BRUZZARDS!!!!

Looking for sleeping bag suggestions that would be good for self support whitewater kayaking. What this means to me is:

1. Super light and super packable
2. Probably synthetic in case it gets wet or rains
3. 3 season warm, like in the 5 - 20 degree range
4. Anything else I'm missing
...and ideally, affordable.

Thanks in advance for your suggestions.
 

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kelty light year 3D

works pretty good
packs down to a reasonable size
rated down to 25 degrees
I augment mine with fleece as needed

got mine on sale and do not remember price but it was not bad
 

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Have you seen this site:
Earthen Exposure: self-support kayaking

This guy has the ultimate ww kayak self-support info site going. He has a sleeping bag section. I think most people go with down due to the lightweight and compression properties - given the limited space in a kayak. Your drybag is supposed to work and if you're sleeping outside w/ no shelter and it rains you're probably in bad shape no matter what kind of bag you have.
 

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A 5-20 degree synthetic bag is fairly bulky. I think a down bag and a smallish packable tarp for rain protection would work. I used a 20 degree synthetic bag with a bivy sack on cataract last month and slept comfy, but woke up really wet every morning (condensation) so if i had down it would have sucked. But i was rafting so space was less of an issue.

If you have time to let your bag dry every morning then you should be fine with down, but i would make sure to bring some sort of rain protection even if its a tarp that you wrap around yourself in case of rain.
 

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Check out the big agnes stuff- instead of insulation in the bottom of the bag (which compresses and doesn't insulate anyway), they have a sleeve for a sleeping pad, which is what provides the effective insulation between you and the ground anyway. Due to this they seem to be 20-40% smaller in pack size and weight than comparable bags.
 

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Thanks for posting meng , I was just about to get on here looking for the same thing. Does anyone know of stuff sacks that compress the bag in a long and skinny way. I have alot of room in the the back of the creek boat but my current bag is too round to fit back there? It sounds like down is the way too go , is there anyone that makes an inexpensive down bag?
 

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I went with Montbell 30 degree bag at 14 ounces and use Patagonia Micro Puff synthetic pants and jacket to add warmth for below freezing temps.
 

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My backpacking bag is a 0 degree Slumberjack. It is synthetic fill, and light weight. I have never used it for a self support kayak trip (yet) but it is warm, packs down tight and small, and was affordable ($80 from Campmor).
 

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Western mountaineering sleeping bags no question. The most ultralight tough and packable sleeping bags out there. They are expensive but have lifetime warranty and used mine well over 300 days already. 15 degree 1lb 10 oz. They are down, but brind a tarp and build a small shelter.
 

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Where are you boating? If you expect to have multiple days of rain, like in the east coast, synthetic is worth it. The only thing worse than a wet night in a down bag is a second wet night in a down bag. If in the rocky mountain west, you're more likely to be able to dry out a wet bag. You may consider a 20 or 30 degree bag augmented by a down sweater for surprise cold nights. If you go down, shoot for 700 fill or better, it's much lighter and more packable. Dries faster too. Some down bags have a water proof shell, which helps for a little drizzle.
 

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My ultra-light Western Mountaineering bag is a masterpiece: super-quality down, excellent fabric, beautiful cut. It stuffs unbelievably small for the warmth. I've slept in it (really slept, not just dozed & froze) in a bivy sac at 11,000 ft. in the low 20s with snow and wind.

A good river combo is an ultralight bag (the Big Agnes bags are also excellent), a bivy sac with netting and a bit of headroom, and an ultralight tarp (I've got SILTarps and a SILShelter from Integral Designs that fit in a coffee mug. I've camped out with them on South Island NZ in bloody downpours and stayed reasonably dry).

The key difference with a synthetic bag is that if it does get soaked, you can press out the water and sleep in it. It'll be damp at first, and might stay damp underneath, but for the most part it'll dry out with body heat. Which can save your life. A wet down bag is impossible to dry without considerable heat and fluffing. If you get down, get a really good drybag for it.

Integral Designs used to have some really good lightweight synthetic bags as well. I got a roomy but light Primaloft model that works to mid 30s, with a liner bag that takes it into the 20s (for me, anyhow).
 

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I,ve got a big agnes and like the bottom pocket setup for summer, but I will say that even with the insulated air pad if you push the neg temps it can get awful cold. WM makes the best bags, worth the money.
 

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For cool-cold trips, a bivy sac is a must. A lightweight tarp keeps the rain/snow off your bag and/or bivy and lets you sit up, cook, and eat during storms.

On warm nights, you'll sleep under the stars with your bag unzipped. Cool and dry, tuck into the bivy. Warm with rain, use the bag and the tarp. Cold with rain or snow, use all three.

The combination gives you the greatest temperature range for the least weight and bulk.
 

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On the cheap I use a $100 25 degree (Mountain Hardwear) synthetic bag with a small fleece top that I wear around camp anyways, and the REI minimalist bivy (cheap and bomber). Keeps me warm and dry in most spots in the Rockies. Although I Want to upgrade to a smaller/warmer down bag when I win the Lotto!
 

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One person mentioned condensation. Any suggestions. I have the Golite Shangra-la 3 and a down bag. I have had probs with condensation, ie. Middle Fork on cold damp nights. One thing I did wrong the first night was not allowing adequate ventilation from underneath. It helped to get it off the ground. Lots of people use the Mega-mid. This was sig. more expensive. I think those folks were have some condensation as well. Would the nest that goes inside be helpful? Should I just get a cheap bivy to prevent my downy from getting moist?
 

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Silk sleeping bag liners are absolutely amazing to supplement a crappy summer bag on a fall or spring night. I've used 'em on bike tours and they help a ton more than I thought they would. Got mine at Sierra Trading post back in the 90s. They dry quickly, are super light and tough enough. Something about the tight weave I think.
 

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I will second the Big Agnes gear. 15 degree plus sleeping pad is just a bit larger then 20 degree bag in a stuff sack. Plus I still think they are made up in Steamboat!!!! Plus I like the fact they are roomy and you dont slide of the pad and moves really nicely with you
 
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