Mountain Buzz banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I would like to tap into the expertise of the community for advice on a new raft. My beloved Avon Pathfinder is going to be retired. The bucket floor is just too much of a pain. Funny how we did not notice until we added a Sotar self bailer to the fleet. We use the rafts for remote wilderness fishing trips. We get heli-dropped in for 10 to 15 days. Rapids max out around class 4. Durability is key. Looking for suggestions on what rafts can carry lots of gear but is also light and packable. The Avon was great but a real tank to row.
Thank you for your time and expertise.
Regards
Brayden
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
976 Posts
Neoprene is light and easy to repair...much more easy than the lighter urethane boats. I'd go with that if saving 10lbs makes much difference...otherwise just get another rubber boat and be done with it.

Both Custom inflatables and Airtight inflatables would make you a neo boat...hyside has a few options in neo, but I think they're all on the small side.

If you're just gonna get something off the shelf in rubber, I'd go with an e series NRS.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
909 Posts
Don't know if Inflatable Technologies in Denver is still making boats or not, but years ago they made some super custom tubes for my wife's Russian Cataraft and did an outstanding job for a reasonable cost..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Thanks, for the input. I will look into those. I forgot to mention that high maneuverability is important. Lower water exposes a ton more rocks so being able to move around them is important.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
288 Posts
I think the NRS Otter series would be hard to beat for helicopterability. Loses some points on durability though with lighter fabric. I think it would hit the sweet spot on weight vs durability.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,579 Posts
If you are ok with a Cataraft...this setup is pretty hard to beat... New "International Travel" cataraft package. | Go Light Outdoors

Its a pretty small setup but its very lightweight and packable. If you need a bit more cargo space they make an extension that sleeves onto the back of the main frame. It all breaks down pretty easily and is lightweight enough to carry yourself (my buddy Derik hiking in to Gunny Gorge for a day trip)...

59654


Even if you don't go with the full ultralight setup and all that....you can still make a very decent raft frame out of the same lightweight tubing and fittings if you contact whitewatermachineworks.com

Hyside or NRS are great for a relatively lightweight boat. Hypalon tends to be the lightest and easy to pack small. Maybe try to find an old Avon Scout (12' raft).

Sotar has started making IK's out of a new super lightweight material they found and I really wanna see how viable it would be to make some Cataraft tubes or even a small raft out of the stuff... STEALTH
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
81 Posts
I lived in Alaska for about 10 years and went on multiple fly-in hunts and river trips. After using my 16 foot raft a couple of times, I decided to switch to a cataraft for easier packability on small aircraft and maneuverability on low water trips. Mine was an Aire Cougar which was a real beast for floating a lot of gear and many pounds of moose meat. Also had a frame that broke down into short pieces and stackable deck boards to fit in small aircraft cargo hatches. We flew in planes ranging from Super Cubs to Beavers and it was always easier to load cat tubes than a bulky heavy raft.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
The helicopter will have a max takeoff weight that includes fuel and everything on board. You will need to talk to your pilot and find out his gross for where you are going. That will determine the fuel load and give you the gross payload on that leg of the trip. Once that is determined you can play with the number on your gear and weight of the raft. Obviously the less weight the less helicopter shuttles you will be paying for. also Many times size won’t be a factor if the are slinging it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
The helicopter will have a max takeoff weight that includes fuel and everything on board. You will need to talk to your pilot and find out his gross for where you are going. That will determine the fuel load and give you the gross payload on that leg of the trip. Once that is determined you can play with the number on your gear and weight of the raft. Obviously the less weight the less helicopter shuttles you will be paying for. also Many times size won’t be a factor if the are slinging it.
Max load for this application is 1400lbs on top of the fuel and pilot.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top