Mountain Buzz banner

1 - 20 of 24 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
The subject says it all! And no, a barge is not an option, it will not fit down the Deschutes


I had my first whitewater rafting experience last friday as a company outting on the Clackamas river just south of Estacada, OR and I had a great time, even when I fell out of the boat =)

I'd really like to get into whitewater some more, but don't know enough interested people to fill a raft, and honestly I like the idea of just going out with 1 or 2 other people in kayaks.

I did a search for other "beginner kayak?" posts, but none of them really addressed weight all that much, which I imagine is a concern for someone like me when looking for a boat.

I'm 5'8" and 310lbs right now, and need a boat that I can be comfortable in for 6-8 hours at a time, with room for a few beers/lunch and maybe a camp chair.

From the sounds of it, I don't want to look for something with sharp ends since they are good for speed but tip easier. I'm top-heavy already, so I guess I don't need any encouragement.

Rafting/kayaking looks like it could be the kind of exercise I could get used to, and ideally I'll be able to trade the first boat in next summer for something a bit smaller and more suiting to whatever kind of sport I'm interested in.

Right now I just need something for general class 3/4 whitewater. Any tips are greatly appreciated =)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
851 Posts
Maybe try an Approach from Dagger Kayaks. Also look into a Mega Rocker. Two big boats that will allow you to learn more. Both should fit you although it is at the top of the range. The Approach is a boat to learn the basics in but can also be used as a fun rec style boat. Go to Dagger to learn more.
Good luck with the search and welcome to paddling!

hobie
Dagger Kayaks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
120 Posts
I'd suggest visiting local kayaking shops to discuss gear options. They can answer a lot of your questions and show you a variety of boats, giving you info about pluses and minuses of different boats. They'll also be able to tell you which might work for your size and ambitions. And you can hop into a variety of boats (and other gear), getting the feel for what is comfortable. I'd imagine at your size they might steer you towards creek boats made for big guys (these have rounder edges/hulls and lots of buoyancy relative to the harder edged playboats and river runners).

As a beginning kayaker, you should look into lessons on rolling and basic paddle strokes first (flatwater pond or swimming pool) and start out on class II rivers. Class III is considered intermediate and IV is advanced. I'd suggest having a flatwater roll before trying IIIs . The kayak shop would be helpful for recommending good local sources of instruction and suitable runs for beginners, too.

Welcome to the sport!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Thanks, I'll find a local shop and see what they have to say. Whatever I go with, it'll have to be inflatible since I don't have a roof rack and I don't want to mount anything to the roof of my car.

We have a nice lake about 10 minutes from my house where I can practice different maneuvers, so that's fine.

What else should I look at getting besides a well-rated life jacket, helmet, maybe a splash jacket/skirt and paddle?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
851 Posts
At this time of year a splash jacket should be fine. Regardless of an inflatable or hard boat you will need a helmet, PFD, paddle and proper footwear for safe river running. Also, I don't think you will need a skirt for an inflatable as they are designed as an open cockpit. In the earlier part of the season (aka spring) the water is colder so a wetsuit would be nice. You will be very wet in an inflatable plus the wetsuit offers some bouyancy and protection from the rocks and elements.

h
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,408 Posts
you gotta reevaluate your priorities if you dont want to put a rack on your car, i was with ya till ya said that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
70 Posts
JBL has a yellow titantic or "open boat". Its a whitewater canoe and if it can fit his fat ass, it will fit anyones. I think you could even mount a 15 horse evinrude on that biatch just in case you get caught in a keeper. Plus he's from Tennessee and I guarantee you could damn near take it from him when he's not lookin and he'll think he lost it and go buy knew one. Everyone makes out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
you gotta reevaluate your priorities if you dont want to put a rack on your car, i was with ya till ya said that.
I guess I don't mind putting a rack on my car, but it has to be one that doesn't require drilling any holes and doesn't dent/damage the car or paint. I don't know a whole lot about after-market roof racks so I don't really know what's out there :)

Still, I would prefer an inflatible boat so I can put it in the trunk/back seat regardless of who's car we're taking
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
137 Posts
you're looking for an Aire Lynx, NRS's Maverik or Hyside's Padillac. All good IK's. If you go Aire then avoid the cheapo tomcat's with vinyl bladders. Crap. Get the urethane bladders that will last forever if you got that way.

good luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
343 Posts
Get a raft or inflatable! Pleny of room for lunch and beer. You will not be top heavy in a raft.

If you are set on kayaking go to a pool roll session this winter to see if you even like kayaking.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,408 Posts
tubers right, get a long two piece paddle and you are good to go
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
I hope you don't mind me piggybacking on your thread.

I'm in a similar situation, 5'9" 250 and I love being out on the water. I recently joined a Outing/Kayaking organization and will be getting more instruction over the next few weeks and love every bit of it so far. Unlike the post author, I'm looking for a hard shell kayak and would love to hear a few more suggestions from you knowledgeable people. Suggestions on both sea and WW kayaks would be much appreciated. Thanks a bunch1
 

·
KDT
Joined
·
207 Posts
db-
you're 60 lbs lighter than the poster. that opens up a lot more options for you.
check out a Jackson SuperFun. great boat for big guys.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
95 Posts
db99

I, too am a big guy at 220 lbs and have much experience.

I'm sure by now you've read enough advice on kayak threads to realize someone is going to tell you that it depends on the type of boating you plan to do.

That said, I could find no better boat for all around river use than the Wavesport Super EZ. It'll float you, and will river run well as well as afford you some basic play like cartwheels and stalls.

If you're looking for a river runner then I am a big fan of utilizing a creeker like a Dagger CFS for a guy your size. The CFS is, for most people, a true HIGH volume boat made for LOW volume rivers. For you it will feel like a river runner and will be an amazing downriver boat in all but the biggest big water. For true big water I would go back to a slicier boat like the Super EZ.

So, there ya have it, two boats that are tailor made to a guy your size and give you a vast array of possibilities. Get both or just get one depending on your needs.

If you want to e-mail me with questions about big guy boats and big guy boating feel free.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Get a raft, brotha

Start out in a raft, there's no where on the Deschutes you can't take it. You can pack your stuff, you can go it alone with a frame and oars or take a group and paddle. The Clackamas, McKenzie and Deschutes are all good places to learn. The upper Clack and Hood Rivers are great when you have a little more experience. Fun fun! Yay Oregon Rivers!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
I hope I dont sound like a prick, but buddy you need to join a gym, cut back on the crap food and drop down to 250 by next spring and then get into the big Jackson fun. You will have a hard time rolling any boat when you weigh over 300lbs. Seriously take care of yourself and then start boating next year. You know I am right, you know you want it, so start today!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
343 Posts
I hope I dont sound like a prick, but buddy you need to join a gym, cut back on the crap food and drop down to 250 by next spring and then get into the big Jackson fun. You will have a hard time rolling any boat when you weigh over 300lbs. Seriously take care of yourself and then start boating next year. You know I am right, you know you want it, so start today!!
Come on, that is uncalled for.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
Is it really uncalled for. A 300lb dude swimming in a river dosnt sound very safe to me for a ton of different reasons. Its funny to see some folks post that raft companies should police themselves better when it comes to who gos on what trips due to their size or age, but we sit here and encourage someone who is obviously totally out of shape to try kayaking where their chances of swimming are much much higher.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
343 Posts
Is it really uncalled for. A 300lb dude swimming in a river dosnt sound very safe to me for a ton of different reasons. Its funny to see some folks post that raft companies should police themselves better when it comes to who gos on what trips due to their size or age, but we sit here and encourage someone who is obviously totally out of shape to try kayaking where their chances of swimming are much much higher.
Maybe he is just big-boned?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
Hey Grandpa, I may weight a lot but I'm in better shape than you think. I don't eat fast food, or drink soda, and I cook/prepare most of my meals. My problem is that I've had a mostly inactive lifestyle since a near-fatal car accident 2 years ago when I lost an eye and had to have reconstructive surgery on my face.

Before my accident, I was a regular skiier/skydiver and did a fair amount of mountain biking, and still could not drop below 230. I am now walking regularly, playing frisbee golf, bike riding, and hiking occasionally.

My skydiving experience has taught me well to avoid activities that I am not prepared for, and to seek the advice of others in regards to technique and safety. Believe me when I say that my swimming and paddle strength are not a concern on the types of runs that I would be boating on.

You would do well to make sure you're hungry before you open a can of worms. I understand you think you're doing me a favor by trying to dissuade me from enjoying a potentially dangerous sport, but you definitely sound like a prick. :p
 
1 - 20 of 24 Posts
Top