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Discussion Starter #21
Salmon Pemmican...

ColoradoDave... I looked up Salmon Pemmican on the internet like you suggested, thank you, turns out to be a great suggestion.
Going to try it this week. Pacific Ocean Market sells dryed Salmon, dryed blueberries, many stores handle's them, rendered beef fat(Fatworks Pure Tallow) Walmart carries it, teaspoon of salt and black pepper. Mash dryed Salmon and blueberries, than mix together, add rendered beef fat, salt and pepper...your done. Roll in saran wrap, in small rolls, keep for years, without refrigerating. Plus you can use it in a bunch of different recipes in a variety of dishes.....this is the interesting part, the rendered fat from "Fatwords Pure Tallow" is good for your health, it is loaded with vitamins A,D,E,K. Antioxidants, omega-3 fatty acids. It also makes great skin lotion(tightens and rejuvenating your skin), soap and candles. I'm going to start using at home and camp cooking on my griddles. I just read up on it while looking for rendered beef fat.
 

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Discussion Starter #23
Hit me up...

Good info and I'm just going to happen to be in Broomfield in 2 weekends.
PM me on MB, when your in Broomfield and going to Pacific Ocean Market, there's a restaurant called Emperor Palace, great Chinese grub next door, if you have time we can grab some lunch.
 

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Nubie Jon...Watch those girls they grow up fast, I have three, all have different personalities, I love all three.
Raymo indeed they do..... mine is 10 going on 20 and I feel the need to cherish every moment I get with her as soon they will be gone.

Late season elk/deer( Nov. 2-10th) nice. Hope you get some heavy snow before your hunt, to drive those bad boys down from the high country, to improve your chances of getting some meat on the table. Here's a hunting story you might enjoy. A friend and I were tracking through the back country for about 4 hours, when we ran into another friend(dave) in our party that was field dressing a nice 5 point elk. So we pitch in and started helping him, we got the elk all dressed out. We told Dave we will head back and get the horse's, be back in a couple hours. He said wait a second, when he shot that elk, he was totally lost and has no fucking idea where he's at. He was walking up to the top of the mountain to get his bearings when he came across this nice elk. Than we show up. We took the map out to get him straighten out, he had walk two valleys further than he thought. We all had a good laugh, especially around camp that night with all the others in our party. Good times.
I love hunting third season up in the Flat Tops (Area 25, 26) as the weather and terrain can change drastically up there. We ended up leaving a buddies camper up there last year but that is a story for another time. Similar story: I shot a nice doe two years ago on a friends ranch. My GPS's batteries died and so I started hiking out to get the ATV. I decided to be smart and I let a tail of TP at two different points in order to set up a bearing on my kill. When I finally got back up with the ATV would you believe that it took me 1.5 hours to find it..... in the 600 acres of similar looking land..... Just goes to show you how much we (and by we I mean me) rely on electronics these days! Now I carry redundancy (map and compass!). Hopefully this year they will come down a bit.... Last year my nephew's came at 11,500.
 

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Nubie, get that book before your hunt. Then you (and the family) can pick out a bunch of stuff you want to try and then butcher accordingly. It always gets me fired up for the hunt and makes it easier to cut and package when it comes to processing. I even write the recipe i want to use it for on some of the packages when I wrap and label them.
Zbaird thanks for the tip! Mine and three others for friends coming Thursday from Amazon.... can't wait to look for it. I was also reading somewhere on the interweb that the venison/elk flat iron steak is coming back..... anyone use this cut at all, I think I will try it.
 

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Discussion Starter #28
Nubie Jon... whenever I deal with a cut of meat like flat iron, leg shank, etc. that are on the tougher side, I marinate it in Coca-Cola for about 24 hours and let the acid tenderize the meat, works great or you can pound it with a hammer to break up the muscle. Than cook it anyway you want, barbecue, roast, teriyaki, Philly-Cheese steak, etc. Good luck on your hunting trip, I use to get so excited it was hard for me to sleep for a week or two.
 

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Yep. For those not in the know. ( it does seem to be the trendy hipster cut of meat these days) Wide side of the scapula. Big band of connective tissue runs through the middle. Absolutely has to be "fileted" into two steaks if you are going to grill/fry it. Otherwise the band curls and you are hosed.

On another note, made Osso Bucco last night (more like yesterday morning). Its such satiny, lovely, deliciousness. Do not grind your shanks!! You'll be fired up when you get into Buck Buck Moose. Buzz me if you're gonna make it, I have some tips I've learned after a couple fails using the recipe in the book.
 

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Discussion Starter #31
I totally agree, when you go after big game you buy the whole animal, you don't get to pick and choose just the delicious cuts like at the supermarket. Buck, Buck, Moose is a book I wish I had in my hunting years to create some tasty dishes. My style was, if I could not identify it, it went into the grinder. I usually used the back strap's, tender loins, rumps and shoulder's, the traditional ways. Using Coca-Cola to tenderize came about in my later years, still nothing like a big hammer to make those tougher parts of your game into tender morsels, just don't hit your thumb.
 

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Yep, though I have got some hell that I'm not officially "braising" . I dust in flour, brown well on all sides then crock. I seem to have better luck with the crock than braising in the oven. Ive tried to get people to who have said it isn't "braising" in the crock like in a dutch in the oven but haven't heard a good reason. It seems to turn out better for me so i guess thats what matters.
 

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Yep, though I have got some hell that I'm not officially "braising" . I dust in flour, brown well on all sides then crock. I seem to have better luck with the crock than braising in the oven. Ive tried to get people to who have said it isn't "braising" in the crock like in a dutch in the oven but haven't heard a good reason. It seems to turn out better for me so i guess thats what matters.
A big part of tasty braising is browning on all sides. You can't skip that step of caramelizing the meat (google "Maillard effect"). It adds immensely to the flavor.


I don't have as good of luck in the crock pot..but I tend to do the dutch oven thing in the oven at 190°-210°F.


I think part of my crock pot issue is that I don't like to add liquid at the start, and that's a no-no for crock pots. It works in the DO at lower temps. But whatever works for you...I'm not going to judge you for your methods, your results are what matters.
My wifey loves the insta pot and I'm impressed with her results.
 

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So just got to work and what do you know...... my copy of Buck, Buck, Moose was sitting on my desk! Between that and catching up on the threat there is very little getting done on the work front! TGIF!

A big part of tasty braising is browning on all sides. You can't skip that step of caramelizing the meat (google "Maillard effect"). It adds immensely to the flavor.
I watch a lot of Alton Brown "Good Eats" and now "Good Eats Reloaded" He speaks a lot about the "Maillard effect" in cooking, not just in braising. I like his style because it is the "science of cooking" rather than just cooking.

Just did my first "hike" though the hunting grounds..... not real encouraging yet with the temps we've been having but I was only at about 10000 ft.
 

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Congratulations. It will change your program. I used to throw a bunch of the good sized odds and ends chunks in the grind pile. Now I put them together in packages that I label crock. Most of it ends up in tacos using the barbacoa recipe on page 126. Probably make that more than anything else. Its awesome.
 

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Discussion Starter #36
Hunting for wild game from beginning to end is very challenging and rewarding to us, to prepare wild game from the field to the dinner table. Jerky, Pemmican, crock pot, baking, barbecue, etc. Setting up hunting camp, sighting in your rifles, cooking, stocking your game, field dressing, transporting game, processing it was all very enjoyable to me, plus it tastes great. It's all like a great river trip, just in another way.
 

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Good luck man!! Im hoping you get to put that book to good use!! Take a couple extra gallon ziplocs with ya. If you are in a position to collect at least some of the caul fat you won't be disappointed. I at least collect the big rectangle of it right at the opening before I yank the guts out. Its easy to strip off. If you can get more, great. A drape of it over any roast is good and rolling meatballs in it like the ones on page 241 are wonderful.
 

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Discussion Starter #39
Nubie Jon, good luck on your hunt. Well I just finished eating the last batch of home made jerky, I did something different, I used concentrated onion juice. A little bit goes a long way , trust me. A long story short, I was crying, dogs were crying while we watched the Broncos game and eating the onion spiced
beef jerky. Next time I will just use my normal amount of onion power. Plus the juice gave the meat a weard after taste. Not my best batch
 

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I didn't have time to go through the thread.

The best jerky is made in a smoker I think. First brine in layers sprinkled with a little salt and brown sugar. A compressing disk atop each layer and a final weight on top. I do this in a bucket and circular lexan disks to fit. Overnight this process.

When I was young and poor I'd use a smoker made of an old refrigerator, a cast iron skillet and a hot plate. I preferred wood chips of apple or hickory. I suggest not using pine or juniper:).

The rest of the process is obvious. Smoke until you are pleased.
 
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