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I dont know if I understand which knot you are referring too.... but the prussik is tied with a doublefisherman and looped directly into the biner., and that shoudl be it. As a side note, if you want to tie the end of a rope off to a biner use a figure 8
 

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Yeah, to me that looks like the double fisherman knot used to tie the two ends of a single peice of rope together to make the prussik loop. . The caribiner just gets clipped into the prussik loop.
 

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That is a double fishermans used to create the prusik. It is not tied to the carabiner, it just looks like it since he positioned the knot up near the carabiner, thus making it easier to adjust the prusik.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Yeah, to me that looks like the double fisherman knot used to tie the two ends of a single peice of rope together to make the prussik loop. . The caribiner just gets clipped into the prussik loop.
I think your right. I just figured it couldn't be that simple. Thanks.
 

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theoretically, once you have clipped the prusik to the caribiner (assuming you've tied the double fishermans knot and the piece of cord you are using for the prusik is now a loop), you could un-clip the bowline from the boat, as the prusik should take all the load. Of course it doesn't hurt to have a backup.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
theoretically, once you have clipped the prusik to the caribiner (assuming you've tied the double fishermans knot and the piece of cord you are using for the prusik is now a loop), you could un-clip the bowline from the boat, as the prusik should take all the load. Of course it doesn't hurt to have a backup.
I suppose you could, but why would you want to?
 

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Help a dummy out here, please explain the prusik.
 

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I found the best solution is a knot system I made up I call the Kansas City Hitch. One of the problems I found is when your raft is 20 feet from the tree or bush, but you have a 75 foot bow line. It can be a pain to run all of the extra rope around a bush and tie a knot with all of the excess line, so I just feed a loop around the tie down anchor, keeping the line from the boat and the excess line on the same side. Then I clip a biner to the loop, tie a bowline with both lines (from the boat and the excess) and clip the biner to the double bowline. The double bowline is easy to untie to readjust, but you could also tie a bowline in the loop around the anchor and clip it to a prussic on the boat line. Lots of variations can be made.
 

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I use this rig (thanks Stupid Guide Tricks!)

The prussic is a sliding knot that will grip tight when tension is placed on the tag end. It lets you adjust the tension on your bow line quickly and without ever having to untie the terminal knot.

It is particularly useful when the water level is changing or when the buoyancy of the raft changes (like during loading and unloading). You can keep the bow and stern lines tight to keep the waves from pounding the boat against sharp rocks on shore or to keep the boat snug against the bank for better footing while stepping on the rubber. Ever step onto a raft carrying a heavy cooler and have the boat move out from under you?
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I found the best solution is a knot system I made up I call the Kansas City Hitch. One of the problems I found is when your raft is 20 feet from the tree or bush, but you have a 75 foot bow line. It can be a pain to run all of the extra rope around a bush and tie a knot with all of the excess line, so I just feed a loop around the tie down anchor, keeping the line from the boat and the excess line on the same side. Then I clip a biner to the loop, tie a bowline with both lines (from the boat and the excess) and clip the biner to the double bowline. The double bowline is easy to untie to readjust, but you could also tie a bowline in the loop around the anchor and clip it to a prussic on the boat line. Lots of variations can be made.
My plan is to bring the bag to shore taking out only a little more rope than needed to get to the anchor point. Make a figure 8 with loop and attach a carabiner to loop and anchor point. That way you can close the bowline bag with all the extra rope in side and with the Prusik you won't have to retie your knot on the beach.
 

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Always good to have more tools in the toolbox but how easy it to release a tensioned prusik? I remember them being a nightmare to undo when tensioned in self rescue scenarios during my canyoneering guide certification. I would assume its the same with a heavily weighted raft that wasn't continuously adjusted for a low tide in a place like the Grand. Hence my preference for the Taut line hitch: same benefits, easier to release when loaded/tensioned. Plus it better qualifies for the KISS principle.

Phillip
 

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Always good to have more tools in the toolbox but how easy it to release a tensioned prusik? I remember them being a nightmare to undo when tensioned in self rescue scenarios during my canyoneering guide certification. I would assume its the same with a heavily weighted raft that wasn't continuously adjusted for a low tide in a place like the Grand. Hence my preference for the Taut line hitch: same benefits, easier to release when loaded/tensioned. Plus it better qualifies for the KISS principle.

Phillip
totally agree, the taut line hitch is by far superior for an application like this in my opinion. Prusik makes sense when you want a stop built into your rope but you don't need a stop in that setup, you just want something to slide. The taut line would hold just fine and is much easier. Use it all the time when guying out tents during the winter in the mountains.
 
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