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Discussion Starter #1
Nah, mining is not bad for watersheds (full sarcasm)-

I just found out about this today. Treasure Canyon is a great run but apparently very polluted. Here is a quote and then a link from the Superfund report

"Ecological impacts from site contaminants are considerable, as the Alamosa River system below Summitville cannot currently support aquatic life. Studies have found potential adverse effects to agriculture and livestock from regular use of Alamosa River water."

"The chemicals of concern are heavy metals (copper, cadmium, manganese, zinc, lead, nickel, aluminum, iron) on-site and in the acid mine drainage."

Summitville Mine Superfund Site
 

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The upside? You won't have to take a mineral supplement if you paddle there. Might exceed the recommended daily allowances, however. Sip conservatively...
 

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Discussion Starter #3

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The mining runoff comes into the Alamosa River from the Wightman Fork.

That's downstream of the Treasure Canyon run.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
The mining runoff comes into the Alamosa River from the Wightman Fork.

That's downstream of the Treasure Canyon run.
Oh yeah, that's great news!

I guess I should have researched that better but thanks for the info!
 

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hate to tell you but many rivers in co are the same way, the animas is just now recovering 30 yrs after the cleanup began... rivers do recover, the fish in the animas are starting to breed further and further up the river.
 

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hate to tell you but many rivers in co are the same way, the animas is just now recovering 30 yrs after the cleanup began... rivers do recover, the fish in the animas are starting to breed further and further up the river.
I do understand that many of Colorado's streams have been severely impacted by acid discharge from mining (AMD). Saying rivers just simply recover is a huge stretch in many cases where intense remediation and restoration are often necessary because often the AMD will continue into the watershed indefinitely until corrected - and then the process of slow recovery you are referring to can begin IF the right amount of effort and resources are dedicated. I just posted the Alamosa case because it's both such an obscure river (it is fully dewatered before reaching the Rio Grande) and such an extreme case that I found it interesting.
 

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and you can camp on top of mine tailings at the take-out. it isn't toxic waste...its historic. just ignore that funny smell, and don't stay too long.
 

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I see mining pollution the same way I see rainbow trout....neither are supposed to be there, but they are. That said, rainbow trout taste better.
 
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