Mountain Buzz banner

1 - 20 of 23 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
446 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I know the AIRE Sabertooth is marketed/pushed as an R2 boat but is anyone running frames on them (or on similar craft) for use with conventional oars? I'm thinking this would make a great sort of compromise craft - sort of a cross between a raft and cataraft in some regards. Some of the benefits of a raft, but some of the performance attributes of a cataraft in some regards. Any input? I've always leaned towards catarafts but....trying to keep an open mind here. I notice the waterline is longer (per specs on their website?) than their 13' Wave Destroyer tubes, but they have a somewhat similar "kick."
 

·
Beginner
Joined
·
2,470 Posts
It would be perfect. However, buy the boat first and have the frame custom built. The front and back tubes on the Sabertooth rise up above the top of the boat a few inches and an ideal frame fit would be snug inside of them. Because every boat is a little different you'll want to measure the boat before hand. If you want to center the oars you'll want some weight toward the front so get a good watertight cooler that you can fill with water for your front bay. 8 1/2 foot oars are what you want for this. The spare will fit better as a breakdown stowed on both sides.

Please post pics if you do this. I demoed a ST and immediately wanted to row one!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
446 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Oops, just noticed you're Canadian. You'll want the 2.5908 meter oars.
LOL - 8 1/2 foot sounds fine. Because we are so intermingled with the USA, most Canadians use feet and inches still although officially we are "metric." The only metric most people use in Canada is for measuring speed (km/h) and in most cases, for weather (celsius over fahrenheit - I still use fahrenheit in most cases). I still convert though to Miles per US Gallon however as it makes the most sense to me for figuring gas mileage. Thanks for the input!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
446 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
It would be perfect. However, buy the boat first and have the frame custom built. The front and back tubes on the Sabertooth rise up above the top of the boat a few inches and an ideal frame fit would be snug inside of them. Because every boat is a little different you'll want to measure the boat before hand. If you want to center the oars you'll want some weight toward the front so get a good watertight cooler that you can fill with water for your front bay. 8 1/2 foot oars are what you want for this. The spare will fit better as a breakdown stowed on both sides.

Please post pics if you do this. I demoed a ST and immediately wanted to row one!
I'd probably opt for an NRS frame at the end of the day for the versatility and ability to configure it different.

Just thinking out loud here - again your input is most appreciated - if I orientated the frame for the oarsman to be more towards the front - do you think the front foot cups would be a good "brace" for your feet while honking on the oars? Would they hold up or would a frame bar be better?

I'm trying to think if I could make this a decent 2 man boat for shuttling between fishing spots, or a one man boat for short overnighters, or just whitewater fun, etc. Or maybe even a boat 2 guys could fly fish out of (oarsman, angler in front, etc.). The NRS frame would offer me versatility in this regard which is why I would lean towards that. The only downside I see is that you lose the technical height between the tubes due to the inflable cross members, which water can act upon - one of the advantages of a cat with high riding frame. Similar length cat tube would be cheaper (wave destroyer 12 or 13) but you'd pay more for the frame due to the inner length bars to hold onto the inner d-rings so in the end you'd come out about the same give or take price wise. But the Sabertooth to me looks like a more "secure" looking craft if it's fair to say. That's what I like it. But I like cat's with no floor or anything in the bay for technical water where there isn't as much in the middle to act upon the boat if it's fair to say. Any thoughts about this are appreciated it. I guess it's all about trade offs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
206 Posts
I saw a guy running oars on his on the Salmon. Its a small cat. Pretty simple.

I have a JPWINC Culebra with a very simple NRS frame on it. 48" width, 8" towers, 8' oars. Sometimes I wish the oars were 7.5's, but they work fine. My buddy loves 8.5's for his 54" frame.

I have two straight crossbars that sit in front of the thwarts. I made seat boards that I strap to the bars and the boat. Keeping the rig light is key. It only takes about 30lbs forward to counterbalance my weight. Just like any cat, it overloads very easily and becomes awkward. But it is fun rowing up to class 4+ on technical water.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
506 Posts
I think, unless you are looking for a paddle boat go with a traditional cat. Those cross tubes take up so much space. Putting a simple frame on a paddle cat to gain some versatility makes sense to me but it sounds like to me you want an oar rig all or most of the time. That paddle cat set up will work but you give up an awful lot of space. I have a couple buddies with WDs one 15 and one 14 and they are both very well set up for white water and carrying gear, lots of gear actually. They wouldn't be that great to fish from but to get you and a buddy from spot to spot they would be fine. Just seems like a lot less trade offs.


Jim
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,085 Posts
I think, unless you are looking for a paddle boat go with a traditional cat. Those cross tubes take up so much space. Putting a simple frame on a paddle cat to gain some versatility makes sense to me but it sounds like to me you want an oar rig all or most of the time. That paddle cat set up will work but you give up an awful lot of space. I have a couple buddies with WDs one 15 and one 14 and they are both very well set up for white water and carrying gear, lots of gear actually. They wouldn't be that great to fish from but to get you and a buddy from spot to spot they would be fine. Just seems like a lot less trade offs.


Jim
+1 I considered that but If you want a 12 foot oared rig why not just go with a Destroyer12? IMO that will do all and more than the Sabertooth unless you want specifically a paddle cat. And, if you go a tiny bit bigger you have a much more versatile rig. ie multiday, passenger etc.
 

·
no tengo
Joined
·
1,874 Posts
I went from wave destroyer to sabertooth A. I have a small garage and no trailer so the simple frame is quicker to rig. B. things are lighter so portaging is also quicker. C. I can R2 it and have which is a hoot. D. I have a raft for gear/people hauling.

I have found you can self support for a week no problem just think like a kayaker.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
135 Posts
I just ran Gates of Lodore in my Hyside PaddleCat with an oarframe and it was great. I used a 48" wide NRS frame with 8' counterbalanced Cataract oars. I don't think I'd change anything about the setup.

I was sitting ahead of the rear thwart and used footcups for bracing and it worked. I had two big drybags up front, over the "skirt" with myself and a couple lighter drybags towards the rear.

I like having the PaddleCat to R2 on daytrips. It worked great for a multi-day with a frame with support from others for group gear. It's very fun with the frame on day trips... so maneuverable!!! I also have a 16' cat when I need extra people/gear hauling ability.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
432 Posts
FWIW, I sold my Hyside Paddlecat (that I was using mostly with a small NRS frame) and bought Sotar Legend cat tubes. If I had been using the paddlecat to R2 as I thought I might, I would have kept it. (My wife likes to kayak, but does not like paddling from a tube -- torso twist.)
I've been enjoying having no floor. I have an extra seat bar that I slide on the rear of the frame if I am taking a passanger. Rowing the paddlecat, I didn't get the fore/aft weight distribution right, but I wasn't commited to figurng a way around that (adding weight to the front). I tried some Legends on a Rogue trip and just loved them. It is true that the cat frame is more complex than the simple NRS raft frame I was using on the paddlecat -- but I have a trailer and just leave the cat rigged. (I do like flintstoning in the cat.) As they say, YMMV.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
77 Posts
Paddle Cat

I've got a Paddlecat and would echo lots of the advice here. 8" oar stands over 6" is a must, my 8.5 oars are a bit to long and heavy due to the skinny frame - 8' with counter balance would be perfect. It's a really fun and versatile boat with a frame or R-2 or R-3. I ran some class 4+ with the fame this spring and had a blast, the boat is so manuverable. If you just want to run the gnar with a row frame a cat would be a better rig but once you hike the boat down the Gunni for some R-2 action you'll be hooked on the versatility of the Sabertooth. Lastly Aire put some features on their version of a shredder that I really wish my Paddlecat had - raised bow and stern, padded floor for your knees, big foot pockets instead of tiny foot cups you cant get Chacos in, and an optional that thwart I really wish I had in my boat to brace my inner foot off of. Of course it costs the most and weighs the most too...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,085 Posts
I went from wave destroyer to sabertooth A. I have a small garage and no trailer so the simple frame is quicker to rig. B. things are lighter so portaging is also quicker. C. I can R2 it and have which is a hoot. D. I have a raft for gear/people hauling.

I have found you can self support for a week no problem just think like a kayaker.
Oh.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
116 Posts
Aire sent one of the first sabertooths to Canyon and they built the first row frames for those things, the guys name is John that has a sweet frame setup. I don't have a link but I will look for it. Lots of pictures of his boat. Look like it works really well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Need more storage for my new Sabertooth with rowing frame

I have a new Sabertooth with a NRS frame but need more storage for multi day trips. I am figuring out best way to add more storage in the rear behind the thwart. Any suggestions?
I am thinking about the following;
1. Add length to the side bars and add two crossbars and a drop bag.
2. Make a separate rectangle for the back and add a drop bag.
Ideas?
Thanks!
Sarah Durango
 
1 - 20 of 23 Posts
Top