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Yes folks, this IS very serious in so many ways. Please sign if you've ever enjoyed a day of fishing, a day of boating, appreciate CO wildlife and river scenery, OR know anyone who does.

The Fraser River is right by my house. We should have a month or more of good class III boating, but many years we don't get a single day of "boatable" flows due to water diversions. There is a great take-out, but the put-in is a bit tricky. This could be resolved if we actually had some water to float, but sadly folks want to take more water from an already endangered river. The low flows during the summer result in high water temps that kill the trout as well. Even if you aren't interested in the Fraser, since it flows to the Colorado, it will affect water availability for so many other river users. :cry:
 

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sad for the trout and kayakers

indeed fraser is a really nice run-good boating and scenery in a nice secluded canyon. used to live in tabernash for a while and got to do laps a few seasons. gets harder to run every year it seems and i havent done it in quite a while

why can't front range conserve water? been a while since i lived there. i know my brother says his las vegas water rate is far lower than when he was in seattle. just doesn't make any sense
 

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Signed.

Shoot the sprinklers. Go xeri. Stop making so many babies. Save our fish. Save our water for better uses than golf courses. Save it for breweries.
 

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laughingo and crying! when are we humans gonna figure it out. we need to exist with our planet. every change we make to it ends up f#####ing us!!

signed
 

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When I shared this on Facebook I got this comment from a friend who owns property in Winter Park as well as Denver, and thought it was worth sharing:

"Alright brother I signed this but in a conversation with a Diane Degette several years ago, she noted that the blanket petitions/emails are one of the least effective ways to instigate political change. She advised a personalized letter/email to your reps. I'll take the time to send one, hope you do too. And btw Denverites shouldn't be allowed to have lawns as far as I'm concerned.....it's called zero scaping people. That's what you get when you live in an arid climate zone."
 

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I agree with xeriscaping. Most of my lawn is river rock or landscaping. I live in the front range.

However, should we discuss the fact that some of the farmers on the front range (and other western state homesteads) use more water than hundreds of homes combined but yield no edible crop? "Use it or lose it" sound familiar? Slow down irresponsible water consumption premised upon 100+ years of antiquated water rights.
 

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Logan - I do not pretend to understand this situation. It is very complex. However I have gone to a couple meetings on the topic, and while most of it was confusing to me this is what I gathered:

Basically the water company bought water rights a million years ago for a donkey and a bushel of hay when Grand county had no concept of the number of golf courses and lawns they'd want to soak with our river, and now they own the water, period. The politicians (especially Senator Udall) are already on our side and fighting for us, but there is really nothing they can do to change the water rights. TU is trying to show the importance of NOT destroying this river/ecosystem and the unpopularity this will cause Denver Water if they do. While large corporations are ultimately about making money, they don't like to be hated either. This is where the petitions come it. Writing a letter is good too - make sure one goes to Denver Water though.

If I understood incorrectly, feel free to clarify.
 

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Logan - I do not pretend to understand this situation. It is very complex. However I have gone to a couple meetings on the topic, and while most of it was confusing to me this is what I gathered:

Basically the water company bought water rights a million years ago for a donkey and a bushel of hay when Grand county had no concept of the number of golf courses and lawns they'd want to soak with our river, and now they own the water, period. The politicians (especially Senator Udall) are already on our side and fighting for us, but there is really nothing they can do to change the water rights. TU is trying to show the importance of NOT destroying this river/ecosystem and the unpopularity this will cause Denver Water if they do. While large corporations are ultimately about making money, they don't like to be hated either. This is where the petitions come it. Writing a letter is good too - make sure one goes to Denver Water though.

If I understood incorrectly, feel free to clarify.

I don't disagree. It would probably be better served to send your letter to Denver Water than to your Senator. I also agree that it will likely change nothing because the water rights have already been purchased and the majority of citizens in our state are in favor of such projects. Good point to start a new conversation on.

What do you feel is the best way to approach facilitating future change to water consumption and water law in Colorado? The population is only going to grow, and if weather patterns continue to change in the way we have seen lately this is going to become an even larger issue in the future.
 
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