Mountain Buzz banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Well, they've gone and ruined the Outback as one of the cars of choice for kayakers (lots of threads on various sites about this). The new design of the racks prohibit carrying any more than two kayaks and aftermarket racks such as Thule and Yakima, although they can be used, can only have a spread of the crossbars of about 21 inches. If you need to carry longer boats such as seakayaks or even mountain bikes, as well as your whitewater boats, you know you need more than a 21 inch spread between the crossbars. I am in need of buying a new car relatively soon and was going to get an Outback, but now have to rethink this. Anyone out there have any opinions on the 2010 Forester? I've never had an SUV. Carrying multiple boats, such as creekboats, riverrunners, openboats or seakayaks can necessitate carrying them on their side. Can this contribute to the vehicle being more susceptible to rollover? I would also even be concerned about stacking shorter boats for the same reason. Any thoughts or any suggestions for another vehicle? I am only interested in a new vehicle so I would not consider a used Outback. Don't want someone else's lemon. Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
676 Posts
we have a forester - a 2005. it's a great car but not as spacious inside as you would think.

i had a tacoma but sold it and now drive a dodge 2500 diesel. i missed the tacoma for about 5 seconds after climbing in the diesel the first time. the diesel gets better mileage, can haul/tow way more stuff, and can easily fit 5 people and 6 if necessary. boats def would not be a problem. plus i'm running biodiesel.

the forester is a turbo, and if you don't watch it, you can drop the mileage pretty good by getting on the skinny pedal a little too much. i think my truck can do almost as good as the forester on mileage.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
795 Posts
I doubt a couple hundred pounds will contribute very much to roll-over potential on a vehicle that's 1.5 tons.

It's all in strappage.....you can get more than 2 boats on the outback. My buddy and I have put 5 on top of his (newer) model outback with factory racks.

Is the Outback reeeeaaaally that much different than the Forester??? If you're lookin' at an "SUV"....get a real SUV....consider a 4runner (with a V8!!!) or an Xterra, Trailblazer, Yukon, etc. etc.. Way more room on the inside with trailering potential.

If it's extra room/rack space you're looking for, why not go all out??? I know the Subi's aren't cheap.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
790 Posts
My Honda CR-V has been running strong for over 10 years and has been a great boaters car. I can carry all I need and importantly to me, the gas mileage is relatively good (great compared to SUV's). It has enough clearance to get to most of the places I want to get. That being said, not enough clearance to get up to say, the North Fork of the Crystal but plenty for acess to anywhere on the dirt roads around CB...and its been great in the snow. Also, the reliability is huge. Never a problem with the vehicle since I got it in '98 and it now has 180K on it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
I've got an 09 base model, so it didn't even come with factory racks, but you can get thule feet that screw right into spots in the roof that have a pretty good spread. I've easily had the box full of skis, a bike or two and my boat on there, and could have gotten another boat without getting strap freaky.

Plus I can throw two riverplay boats inside the car with two of us in there for better milage/lazyness.

Got 25-29 mpg across the country at relatively quick speeds and a bunch of shit on the roof.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
37 Posts
I've got an '09 Forrester (came off the assembly line and drove 6mi to the dealership) and I love it for boating. I'm w/ fenris (got the base model as well), the factory racks are unecessary since there are pre-drilled points for Thules,Yakimas, etc. It's got this awesome standard/auto transmission so you can change gears w/o pushing in the clutch, like a race car, so thats pretty nice for mountain driving. Plenty of room, I've slept two people w/ paco pads in the back. It gets between 18-28mpg usually. I think its 9in of clearance, and I took it into NF Crystal this summer. Its built on the Impressa chasis, so its narrow enough to move around on such roads, but a little more clearence may have been useful for that particular scenario. If you really want it to haul, get the turbo (226hp vs 196hp). The biggest downside is that I've been accused of having a "lesbian car."
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
843 Posts
get a van if you wanna carry that many boats. Or better yet an old school bus. . . I don't understand your rational about buying only new cars. That is totally hogwash. Your logic suggests that all used cars are lemons. . .

Well, they've gone and ruined the Outback as one of the cars of choice for kayakers (lots of threads on various sites about this). The new design of the racks prohibit carrying any more than two kayaks and aftermarket racks such as Thule and Yakima, although they can be used, can only have a spread of the crossbars of about 21 inches. If you need to carry longer boats such as seakayaks or even mountain bikes, as well as your whitewater boats, you know you need more than a 21 inch spread between the crossbars. I am in need of buying a new car relatively soon and was going to get an Outback, but now have to rethink this. Anyone out there have any opinions on the 2010 Forester? I've never had an SUV. Carrying multiple boats, such as creekboats, riverrunners, openboats or seakayaks can necessitate carrying them on their side. Can this contribute to the vehicle being more susceptible to rollover? I would also even be concerned about stacking shorter boats for the same reason. Any thoughts or any suggestions for another vehicle? I am only interested in a new vehicle so I would not consider a used Outback. Don't want someone else's lemon. Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
I don't understand your rational about buying only new cars. That is totally hogwash. Your logic suggests that all used cars are lemons. . .
It's not new cars in general (I'm guessing), it's just only buying new Subarus.

The logic that most people have is that the only new-ish used Subarus are going to be lemons because Subaru people don't upgrade to a newer fancier car until they somehow manage to destroy it, unlike the general populus seems to do. Therefore the Subaru's for sale are either incredibly old beaters, or newer lemons.

It's not completely true, but the most common Subaru's for sale are the 97-99 (I think those are the years) Outbacks that constantly blow their head gaskets. There are some older cars on lots, and rarely a newer one, but the used market seems to be ridiculously dominated by that problem engine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
Thanks, Fenris, you are partly correct. Hey Phillips! My "rationale" is that I use my car as my office 3-4 days weekly and on two of those days I travel to the inner city where, if I break down day or night, I could be in big trouble. Being female, it's a fact of life. So, buying new gives me some hope that the likelihood of making it home unscathed is good.

I appreciate all the info all of you have provided so far.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
59 Posts
make that 2 votes for the old cr-v. mine is a 2000 and ive never had an issue with it... not to sound braggy, but i can strap a 14' self bailer/frame/oars to the top of it, put a ton of river gear- whiskey stinky boatmen and dogs-in the back with the seats down (which is also my summer vacation home), drive over AWD terrain...and still make it to the river!

randaddy- where is that picture from?!! didnt that happen on the upper ark? i remember someone telling me about that and i am pretty sure i heard about it 2 summers ago. but i work downstream... please let me know i am dying to hear about it!

kate
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
230 Posts
Well, they've gone and ruined the Outback as one of the cars of choice for kayakers (lots of threads on various sites about this). The new design of the racks prohibit carrying any more than two kayaks and aftermarket racks such as Thule and Yakima, although they can be used, can only have a spread of the crossbars of about 21 inches. If you need to carry longer boats such as seakayaks or even mountain bikes, as well as your whitewater boats, you know you need more than a 21 inch spread between the crossbars. I am in need of buying a new car relatively soon and was going to get an Outback, but now have to rethink this. Anyone out there have any opinions on the 2010 Forester? I've never had an SUV. Carrying multiple boats, such as creekboats, riverrunners, openboats or seakayaks can necessitate carrying them on their side. Can this contribute to the vehicle being more susceptible to rollover? I would also even be concerned about stacking shorter boats for the same reason. Any thoughts or any suggestions for another vehicle? I am only interested in a new vehicle so I would not consider a used Outback. Don't want someone else's lemon. Thanks.
I just bought a 2010 Outback, and I would like to know why it isn't a good kayak vehicle. Just because of the roof rack? My 4Runner will still be the primary water vehicle, but the Outback will be used for longer trips. I have had to use a 2009 Outback the last couple of weeks, and the 10 is way nicer. Much larger, and with the CVT tranny it even gets better mileage than an 09 manual. Still seems with enough ratchet and NRS straps, that I could get four kayaks on the roof.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,408 Posts
If you want something reliable thats in this category, get the Honda Fit. Hondas are crazy reliable and my subaru wasnt.
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top