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No worries. Just didn't want you or anyone getting confused.

Good chance you got them from Zach Gill. Blonde, glasses, giant? He was selling them for awhile I think.

I get confused with other Zach's all the time. There is Zack Sack who own Inflatable tech, Zach ar DRE and now Zach Gill. More Zach's in this industry than a man can..... You know the saying.
 

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Sorry, my brother. I got my Maxxon from a guy named Zach in Lakewood whom I pieced together wrongly to be you on here. My apologies.
Must be the "other Zach" at inflatable technologies on Hampden. Maybe.

(damn. i didn't realize there were so many other zachs)
 

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Hi everybody. First post here and looking to purchase my first raft. I just recently discovered Maxxon rafts and I dug up some old threads and research on them. It appears nowadays they have changed to the Leafield valves and are now welded vs glued on the seams. Seems like some big improvements from the past. Now, I can afford an RMR but I'd like to know how these updated Maxxon rafts compare. The pricepoint looks great on both however it seems RMR has a good following and are quality rafts. Can't find much current info on the Maxxon's so figured I'd turn to the experts here.

Thanks!
Here's kind of a quick run-down the on the pluses and minuses of each: The Maxxons have a glued-in drop stitch floor pad. This creates a very smooth bottom and a generally excellent handling raft. However, there is a lot of glue holding that pad in, so it could fail at some point if you keep the boat long enough. A less important detail, though still worth mentioning, is that the D-rings on the Rocky Mountains are welded, whereas they are attached with glue on the Maxxons (the actual Maxxon D-ring assembly is RF welded - the upper and lower patch - but not welded onto the boat). Maxxons, size for size, are somewhat easier to roll up, and weigh less than RMRs. The RMRs use a considerably beefier base polyester, so their rip strength is higher. That said, most brands are overbuilt these days. Rocky Mountain floors are easy to replace should you ever need to (on sizes 12' and up) since they are laced in. Warranties are the same for both brands. Chances are that you would be happy with either. Perhaps the real question to ask is "Which one can I get my hands on in the next six months". Rocky's fabric coating center, the Trib factory (Sagittarius Sporting Goods), and to a lesser degree Maxxon's China plant, are all running behind a bit due to Covid. Hope that helps.
 

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RMR's are "heavy" duty. My only objection to their catarafts are that I think proportionally they trend toward cargo cats and hence their tube diameter should be larger. Also, the cat tubes lack bow/stern D-rings which can be very dangerous in certain circumstances. I have personally mentioned this lack of grab handles at their bows/sterns three times to the owner. It is very dangerous for a boat not to have a handle to grab hold of. Most all quality cat manufacturers recognize this "FACT". Maxxon lack grab handles also. Maybe that differentiates less expensive catarafts from the tier above.

I just noticed this thread concerns rafts and not catarafts. Oh well. Sorry about that.
The frame is where i would attach bow and stern lines and grab lines to avoid d ring stress... s/b a non-issue
 

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I do know the folks at RMR well, and would spend my money there, just on the 'good guy' principle. I have had good luck with glued boats.
i have also run glued boats for many years, but they were Hypalon... for PVC, i prefer welded materials. i also love the RMR handling, their 13' is one of the best technical water boats i have rowed, and i have experienced excellent tracking and stability in their 14 and 159 Peak designs.
 

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Might I suggest you also look at the Star Kima tubes from NRS? They are three chamber tubes, Leafield valves, they have the bow and stern rings being discussed. I have the 13' and for the price, I'm happy.
 

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The frame is where i would attach bow and stern lines and grab lines to avoid d ring stress... s/b a non-issue
Attachments d-rings on the bow and stern nose of a cat are strictly for grab handles and tag lines, never for bow or stern shore lines.

My bow and stern lines tie to the front and backmost crossbars using double clove hitches which cinch the frame tight and keep the shore lines securely in the middle of the cross bars. I finish the clove hitch with a bowline.

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More recently I've begun to favor using 9/16 spectra webbing climbing runners and a prusik knot on the cross bars. This methos to attach a bow and stern line also keeps the line securely centered on the crossbar. Then I attach a locking carabiner to the runner.
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