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-   -   kayak for big guy? (https://www.mountainbuzz.com/forums/f11/kayak-for-big-guy-29827.html)

cathoundtex 04-18-2010 11:35 AM

kayak for big guy?
 
peaple,i need some help.could someone tell me the best whitewater kayak and or crossover for a guy that weighs over 300 pounds?i see that is the weight limit on alot of them.thanks.

okieboater 04-18-2010 12:15 PM

if you are creeking, Jackson Mega Rocker is a very big kayak.

dograft83 04-18-2010 12:40 PM

I think the old rpm max was up there as well

gh 04-18-2010 01:12 PM

Pyranha Everest.

TenMileCreekKayaks 04-18-2010 02:10 PM

Liquidlogic Remix XP10, 105gals, sweet huge bow hatch and stern storage, drop down skeg for that flat water experience. True expedition machine, tried an true in the Grand Canyon self-supported. Come by and try one out....

TMCK

Jensjustduckie 04-18-2010 08:21 PM

The Dagger Approach 10.0 is 100 gallons or better too, it is rated for up to class III water. It also has a drop down skeg like the Remix but is a more affordable boat because it's not quite as heavy duty as a Remix.

My husband and I started out in the Dagger Approaches, he is over 300 lbs too -he is actually still at 325 and now paddles a Jackson Superfun and Super Hero. Plan on getting your ass kicked in a Mega Rocker or any displacement hull boats.

okieboater 04-19-2010 08:09 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jensjustduckie (Post 179978)
Plan on getting your ass kicked in a Mega Rocker or any displacement hull boats.

I have to throw the BS flag on the above quote.

I have a Mega Rocker and a Super Hero and find both of them take equally good care of me.

Been boating since the 70's, spending time in what ever designs were available and got my ass kicked and saved in all of them.

Just my opinion here, 90 percent of the ass kicking or saving is a result of the person operating the boat not the boat design.

Jensjustduckie 04-19-2010 08:16 AM

^^

The OP sounds new, I stand by my comment. As a new boater it is MUCH easier to stay upright with chines or edges on a boat. Displacement hulls have excellent secondary stability which is great once you know how to brace and balance but as a new boater they are tippy and feel unstable. As a new boater primary stability is your friend, thus a non-displacement hull recommendation.

FruitSalas 04-19-2010 11:37 PM

And I respectfully disagree. A new boater will have a much easier time rolling a displacement hull boat than a chined boat, especially if they are not properly taught how to trail with their heads. Bracing and balancing are one of the very first things taught during ACA kayaking courses, so that argument only works if they are not taught "by the book". Of course, if you're talking about hardshelling while over 300lbs, you might as well get into the long lost art of squirt boating, which might be pretty rad in an RPM.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jensjustduckie (Post 180016)
^^

The OP sounds new, I stand by my comment. As a new boater it is MUCH easier to stay upright with chines or edges on a boat. Displacement hulls have excellent secondary stability which is great once you know how to brace and balance but as a new boater they are tippy and feel unstable. As a new boater primary stability is your friend, thus a non-displacement hull recommendation.


Jensjustduckie 04-20-2010 08:26 AM

Using your logic I still say displacement hulls are not for beginners - yes they may be easier to roll but isn't it better to learn to roll in a difficult boat so your roll is better?

You guys have been paddling for a long time, maybe you have forgotten what it is like to be new.


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