Sat phone rental - Mountain Buzz
 



Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 01-01-2016   #1
 
washoe99's Avatar
 
Helena, Montana
Paddling Since: 1988
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 64
Sat phone rental

I have an early February GC launch. Small 10 day (work limited) trip of 3 cats so going light. I'm considering renting a Sat phone for safety

We usually do a Marsh creek middle-main trip each year and even after running Dagger never felt the need for a phone but feeling different for this trip. Maybe because it's only 3 of us with 2 having younger kids

Any thoughts on who, how, and what to rent?

Thanks


Sent from my iPhone using Mountain Buzz

washoe99 is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 01-01-2016   #2
Beginner
 
Randaddy's Avatar
 
Eastern Slope, Colorado
Paddling Since: 1980
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 2,466
Buy a Delorme InReach. The cost will be similar to phone rental, it will be more reliable, and you get to keep it.
Randaddy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-01-2016   #3
Misspellingintothefuture!
 
mattman's Avatar
 
Tabernash, Colorado
Paddling Since: 2000
Join Date: Jan 2015
Posts: 1,901
ceiba adventures rents them for $12 a day plus however many minutes you use, guessing other grand canyon rental company's have them to. Would be preaty sweet to just own one for all your remote river trips though.

Hopefully you have a back up oarsman or 2? Would be bad if one of the rowers got hurt and could not row out.
Have a fun safe trip!
__________________
We can't always agree, but we can still be civil to each other.
mattman is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 01-01-2016   #4
 
St. George, Utah
Paddling Since: 1974
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 188
Check out Roadpost, good rates on up to date Iridium phones. I have not had good luck in the Grand Canyon with Globalstar phones.

Sent from my SM-T800 using Mountain Buzz mobile app
dsrtrat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-01-2016   #5
 
duct tape's Avatar
 
Colorado Springs, Colorado
Paddling Since: 1974
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 794
I've used Skycall in SLC for two trips. Iridium phones were $10 / day. They mailed hem to you a couple of days before each trip. Russ (I think that was his name) wa a nice guy and flexible with a last minute change on one trip.
duct tape is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-01-2016   #6
 
pmann's Avatar
 
Denver, Colorado
Paddling Since: 1994
Join Date: Mar 2012
Posts: 6
Sat phone rental

I just happened to find Verizon's satellite phone rental program Verizon - Satellite Overview online before clicking over to the MB forums to see what my fellow boaters had to say on the subject. I haven't gotten far enough to see the rates, but one advantage to the Verizon program is that they ship you the phone and then you ship it back when you return, which means one less errand to run when you are prepping for a GC trip.
pmann is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-01-2016   #7
 
flagstaff, Arizona
Paddling Since: 09
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 164
We bought the inreach for last trip. Worked perfectly. Way cheaper..
sleighr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-2016   #8
 
Bellingham, Washington
Paddling Since: 2004
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 151
I would be careful with getting the inreach or similar devices for a replacement to a sat phone.

The Grand Canyon dispatch center is set up to take emergency calls via text, but very few 911 centers elsewhere in the US have that capablility. We are likely 5-10 years away from seeing text enables 911 at most if the places people do raft trips. When things go sideways on you you do not want to be relaying information third hand to 911 via first guy you could get to answer your text.

I have seen a few PLB activations come in at work. All of them had issues with the 911 center being able to convert the coordinates properly to get them to mesh with the format their program uses. This summer I ran into this problem when we were trying to medevac a guy out if Hells Canyon. I gave the dispatcher GPS coordinates, river mile, three different landmarks (we were camped at Bernard), and told her I was between Hells Canyon Dam and White Bird, Id in Hells Canyon Recreation Area. The response I got back was "Hells Canyon is in Lewiston..." It went down hill from there. Without voice communication she would have thought we were somewhere else

Kyle
Wiggins is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-2016   #9
Beginner
 
Randaddy's Avatar
 
Eastern Slope, Colorado
Paddling Since: 1980
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 2,466
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wiggins View Post
I would be careful with getting the inreach or similar devices for a replacement to a sat phone.

The Grand Canyon dispatch center is set up to take emergency calls via text, but very few 911 centers elsewhere in the US have that capablility. We are likely 5-10 years away from seeing text enables 911 at most if the places people do raft trips. When things go sideways on you you do not want to be relaying information third hand to 911 via first guy you could get to answer your text.

I have seen a few PLB activations come in at work. All of them had issues with the 911 center being able to convert the coordinates properly to get them to mesh with the format their program uses. This summer I ran into this problem when we were trying to medevac a guy out if Hells Canyon. I gave the dispatcher GPS coordinates, river mile, three different landmarks (we were camped at Bernard), and told her I was between Hells Canyon Dam and White Bird, Id in Hells Canyon Recreation Area. The response I got back was "Hells Canyon is in Lewiston..." It went down hill from there. Without voice communication she would have thought we were somewhere else

Kyle
I've seen sat phones take up to an hour to work as you search for service. Service is often lost during the call and is unreliable in many deep river canyons. The InReach activates search and rescue. GEOS is very good at relaying coordinates and details to local law enforcement and SAR teams - it's what they specialize in. Personally I would rather get a text that says "Helicopter is on the way, prepare LZ at...." than have to wander up and down the beach saying "can you hear me now?" for an hour.

Every type of communication has its benefits and detriments. I use the InReach weekly to communicate with basecamp and home from work and have come to trust its reliability. I'm sure it could be used to communicate plenty of detail in most emergencies. Of course multiple devices is best for a big expedition or expedition with higher risk.
Randaddy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-2016   #10
 
Bellingham, Washington
Paddling Since: 2004
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 151
Both devices are going to have places where they don't work.

Inreach doesn't alert Search and Rescue. They alert a third party who contacts the local dispatch center in the jurisdiction you are in. This is the weak link in the system. Dispatchers aren't trained in working with GPS coordinates. Most do not understand that GPS has several formats, that there are different datums, etc. They just dump whatever coordinates they are given into whatever format they are using and hope for the best without doing any conversions. This means that those coordinates that so accurately report your location might not be so accurate once your local dispatch center gets through with them. Take that down the line and that message that tells you the chopper is coming doesn't mean it is coming to your location.

The lack of familiarity with determining a incident's location via GPS and landmarks when you are away from the road system is so severe that after giving the dispatcher my GPS coordinates, explaining to her that they needed to convert them to whatever GPS format they use, and giving her several landmarks that are searchable on Google they stilll couldn't figure where we were. The real problem is that they thought they knew where we were, and they assumed that we were wrong because they had our GPS coordinates. It took two hours to convince them we were where we said we were, and then to explain to them where that was because they wouldn't listen before. Using a Inreach or Spot that incredibly frustrating but necessary conversation never would have happened. They would have assumed they knew where we were, and we would have assumed the chopper was coming.

This was in Idaho County which is responsible for the Idaho side of Hells Canyon, and a significant portion of the Salmon. Speaking to my dispatchers this in not a isolated problem. It is not part of their training in most areas because it is not mandated on a national level, and so it is up to the states to require it. I know of none that actually do.

Furthermore rescue situations are rarely as simple as a victim saying send help and the authorities sending in the cavalry to save the day. When things are not that simple having efficient direct communication with your dispatcher is important.

Voice also allows you to communicate directly with your dispatcher and be your own best advocate.

Kyle
Wiggins is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Topic Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
SAT Phone rental Robin Kayaking | Trip Planner 6 03-07-2012 10:36 AM
Bad Experience with outfittersatellite.com sat phone rental kevdog Kayaking | Trip Planner 13 02-14-2012 08:13 AM
Sat Phone rental for Grand Canyon trip? Rogie Whitewater Kayaking 8 08-20-2010 09:42 AM
Satellite Phone Rental??? funkins Whitewater Kayaking 2 06-26-2010 06:42 AM
Sat Phone Rentals Osprey Whitewater Kayaking 6 04-16-2007 04:13 PM

» Classified Ads
Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 10:59 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.