Raft: weight distribution - Mountain Buzz
 



Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 12-03-2016   #1
 
Salt Lake City, Utah
Paddling Since: 2008
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 495
Raft: weight distribution

I'm working with downriver on a new raft frame. I'm looking at a 4 bay frame for a 16 foot raft. I want a drop hatch out front, a place for both a cooler and dry box. I'm 6'4 215lbs so I bring some beef to the boat. The wife is 130 and will be lounging on the front. My question to all the smarter people is: if I sit above the cooler will I be floating a wheelie. As cool as that sounds , I want my rig to be weighted as properly as possible. I just weighed a 30 pack at 25 lbs therefore I could use those to add weight where needed.

Any thoughts?

More importantly, I wanted to start another raft frame geek out thread

Happy holidays

Tda
SLC ut

tanderson is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 12-03-2016   #2
 
Electric-Mayhem's Avatar
 
Lakewood, Colorado
Paddling Since: 1993
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 1,476
I'm a big guy too (bigger actually) and I understand your concern. I sit on my cooler as well, but its not too hard to balance stuff out. I actually find my duffle pile to be more detrimental to trim then the cooler, even when fully loaded up.

I carry at least 4 30mm rocket boxes and a couple of water jugs in the front of my boat and try to get them as far forward as possible if I'm by myself. If I have a passenger, even small people help with the ballast if you put them way up front. I do try to have the weight either perfectly trim or even front heavy since the boat seems to punch holes and waves better that way.

Honestly, its not too hard to figure out with a bit of shuffling of gear and once you figure it out the first time its pretty easy to replicate on other trips.
Electric-Mayhem is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-03-2016   #3
 
bcpnick's Avatar
 
Salt Lake City, Utah
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 215
I'm bigger than you and I have my dry box under me and my cooler in front of me. Passengers sit on a drop back with a cover. I put water jugs and a bunch of gear behind me but it's still pretty close to level with passengers up front.
bcpnick is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 12-03-2016   #4
 
bcpnick's Avatar
 
Salt Lake City, Utah
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 215
And on an unrelated note, I wanted to ask you some questions about your snout but the buzz won't let me send you a message. Will you email me at nick at backcountrypost dot com? Thanks!!
bcpnick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-03-2016   #5
 
bcpnick's Avatar
 
Salt Lake City, Utah
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 215
One more thought - I setup my Aire 156R with 5 bays. The bay behind me is small and just fits buckets and water jugs. It pushes my position closer to center and helps to keep the back end from sitting too low when my fat ass is in there. Pics: https://www.mountainbuzz.com/forums/f...tml#post442880
bcpnick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-03-2016   #6
 
Duckins's Avatar
 
Montrose, Colorado
Paddling Since: 2006
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 239
I think you should consider a going with a 5-bay frame for your 16' boat.
Duckins is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-03-2016   #7
Misspellingintothefuture!
 
mattman's Avatar
 
Tabernash, Colorado
Paddling Since: 2000
Join Date: Jan 2015
Posts: 1,901
Well, I don't qualify as one of the smarter people.
But part of my strategy for MAINTAINING balance, is to put my cooler and water on opposite sides (fore/aft) of the center line, they tend to lose weight at the same speed, and keep me balanced. ( I do the same thing with my beer, half in each end of the boat).
My setup has the entire front of the boat filled with rockets and water jugs, with a table and Paco pad covering them, my passenger rides on top of this deck, making it very easy for me to move weight forward to stay level.

Dry bags and ammo cans on the forward part of the side boards( or on the tubes, if no side boards) is another good way to help make up for the stern gear pile, or not being a scrappy little bastard.

Ya, I would go 5 bay to, if I had a 16', easier to rig more shit, or even the same amount of shit.
__________________
We can't always agree, but we can still be civil to each other.
mattman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-03-2016   #8
Misspellingintothefuture!
 
mattman's Avatar
 
Tabernash, Colorado
Paddling Since: 2000
Join Date: Jan 2015
Posts: 1,901
P.S.
I thought I was good at the balance game, then I got a cataraft!!!!
__________________
We can't always agree, but we can still be civil to each other.
mattman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-04-2016   #9
 
Bayfield, Colorado
Paddling Since: 1980
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 305
Another thing to keep in mind is that if possible you want as much of your weight as possible as close to your pivot axis as possible. Lots of weight way to the front or the rear makes your boat a bitch to pivot. I try to keep my heavy stuff as close to the middle of the boat as I can. It does make a difference.
jamesthomas is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-04-2016   #10
 
cataraftgirl's Avatar
 
Sandy, Utah
Paddling Since: 1997
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 3,344
Since I run my 14 foot raft solo most of the time, I had a similar problem. I'm a full figured gal, not a twiggy, so my weight definitely came into play. I have a 4 bay frame and I row from a dry box. I have a larger dry box that I row from, a smaller dry box, and a 105 cooler. I found that for a solo, it worked best to put my load of loose gear/dry bags in front of me. I have my fat butt/dry box, then the rower bay, then the cooler, then the smaller dry box, then the cargo load area up front. I strap water jugs beside the smaller dry box. The smaller dry box holds heavy stuff that doesn't change during a trip. The bigger dry box holds the dry food and charcoal that gets used up as the trip goes along. Since the cooler is centered, it doesn't affect trim as much as food & ice disappear. The area behind me is empty for egress when landing. When I land, I hop over to the cooler to row into shore.

If I have a passenger, then I rotate the frame and load in a more traditional manner. That would put me/dry box/gear pile on one end and passenger/dry box/cooler on the other. I can always strap some medium sized dry bags on the sides towards the front as needed.

Here's a pic of my solo set-up.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	DSCN0718.jpg
Views:	436
Size:	2.10 MB
ID:	12873  
__________________
"We are all visitors to this time, this place. We are just passing through. Our purpose here is to observe, to learn, to grow, to love....and then we return home."
Australian Aboriginal Proverb
cataraftgirl is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Topic Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
an exercise in weight distribution: trailering readNrun Rafting | Gear Talk 13 10-12-2016 05:39 AM
Balancing Weight on Raft thepudgeman Whitewater Rafting 26 04-04-2016 11:20 PM
Raft Trailer Weight Rating duct tape Rafting | Gear Talk 9 11-06-2013 07:29 PM
small cat weight distribution? spencerhenry Whitewater Rafting 7 05-21-2013 01:20 PM
Boater weight VS Boat weight range adamsnez Whitewater Kayaking 5 09-03-2011 07:24 AM

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 01:59 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.