Basic gear recommendations for new to multi day - Mountain Buzz
 



Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 08-14-2017   #1
 
Bozeman, Montana
Paddling Since: 1988
Join Date: Jul 2017
Posts: 71
Basic gear recommendations for new to multi day

Ok so Iam hell bent on doing some multi day trips with my family and l all we have is car camping [email protected]! And iam on the internet and everyone's an expert and I need every piece of gear I see on every page of every catalogue. So instead of being a sucker and bieng suckered ,I thought I'd ask a really loaded question to this expert audience and hope to get some straight answers. We've been doing overnights for a few years with our cheap gear in garbage bags, yes we are a tad white trash. We've only been doing flatwatet so I never bought proper river gear and we've never needed to be hyper organized because we're road side and we don't stay long. But now iam going to venture into longer trips and slowly introduce my not so adventurous family to whitewater . We have a 14 ft raft outfitted with a nrs frame. Drop bag in front under a table then cooler then rowing then dry box then a everything bag. What size dry bags are good? Are dry duffles good are rocket boxes good? Are little frame pocket bags cool? Do you guys carry big tents and big sleeping pads and car camping stuff or go with back packing gear? Do sleeping bags all get there own dry bag do you share do you have each and everything get a bag? So as you can see I know Jack doodlee and we'll this stuff isn't that affordable so before I start clicking add to cart I thought I'd ask. So if you have a half hour to spare , tell me what you would do if you had a couple grand to spend and wanted to just buy once. Thanks and hope that this isn't to offensive. I have already taken care of safety and won't be getting anyone into water I or they are not prepared for But hope to someday be in some challenging water that demands "rig to flip" . Thanks for any insight you might want to share. Charlie in bozeman mt.

Pinchecharlie is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 08-14-2017   #2
 
Ridgway, Colorado
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 229
A lot of your car camping stuff will work fine IE. stove and kitchen. I put this stuff and dry food in the dry box, my dry box is pretty easily accessible by me when rowing so, I also use it as an impromptu captains box.

As far as dry bags go I have one big jacks bag that holds, my clothes, tent, pad, and sleeping bag. Don't skimp on this bag! This bag will be buried and not accessible while on the river, so I also have a small dry bag that can be rigged on top to carry stuff that I may need during the day. This arrangement is what I expect of any passengers or kayakers that I'm supporting. My daughter's 8 and will be trained in this doctrine.

Sleeping pads are personal preference. Many swear by the paco pad; while I like it on the boat, I'd rather sleep on my thermarest. I'd buy a paco for the boat, somebody will love to sleep on it. My next purchase will be a cot.

Rocket boxes are good, cheap, heavy, ways to keep things dry. They are awkward if you don't have your frame rigged specifically for them. I only use them for the groover and a couple small buddies for first aid and a library.

Fire pans are a necessary evil. They are awesome when set up but a pain in your dick the rest of the time. They don't need to be kept dry but they are very heavy, dirty, and heavy. Pack them low in the boat in a burrito that also contains a fire blanket and some welding gloves. Put somebody else in charge of this operation. Ditto for groover. Delegation is the key to good leadership .
rtsideup is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-14-2017   #3
 
Ridgway, Colorado
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 229
5 gallon buckets are awesome. They're cheap, water resistant, stack when not in use and have many uses. Get a couple gamma lids for them. Trash, recycling, handwash station, boat cleaning, dishwater gathering, ect.
rtsideup is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 08-14-2017   #4
Sponsoring Vendor
 
Whitewater Worthy Equip's Avatar
 
Central Point, Oregon
Join Date: Dec 2013
Posts: 402
Not all fire pan are equal!

If your ready to lighten your burden in the Firepan department give me a shout. 26lbs beats the competor's 45lb ever day.

“Lighten up” Fire Pan XL | Whitewater Worthy



Quote:
Originally Posted by rtsideup View Post
A lot of your car camping stuff will work fine IE. stove and kitchen. I put this stuff and dry food in the dry box, my dry box is pretty easily accessible by me when rowing so, I also use it as an impromptu captains box.

As far as dry bags go I have one big jacks bag that holds, my clothes, tent, pad, and sleeping bag. Don't skimp on this bag! This bag will be buried and not accessible while on the river, so I also have a small dry bag that can be rigged on top to carry stuff that I may need during the day. This arrangement is what I expect of any passengers or kayakers that I'm supporting. My daughter's 8 and will be trained in this doctrine.

Sleeping pads are personal preference. Many swear by the paco pad; while I like it on the boat, I'd rather sleep on my thermarest. I'd buy a paco for the boat, somebody will love to sleep on it. My next purchase will be a cot.

Rocket boxes are good, cheap, heavy, ways to keep things dry. They are awkward if you don't have your frame rigged specifically for them. I only use them for the groover and a couple small buddies for first aid and a library.

Fire pans are a necessary evil. They are awesome when set up but a pain in your dick the rest of the time. They don't need to be kept dry but they are very heavy, dirty, and heavy. Pack them low in the boat in a burrito that also contains a fire blanket and some welding gloves. Put somebody else in charge of this operation. Ditto for groover. Delegation is the key to good leadership .
__________________
May the water be under your boat and the wind at your back.
Jake Wallace, Owner
whitewaterworthy.com
Whitewater Worthy Equip is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-14-2017   #5
 
Jackson, Wyoming
Paddling Since: 2011
Join Date: Apr 2016
Posts: 92
Dry bags are totally great, between 2 people we use a giant one for our camping gear, and then we each have a duffel for our nightly pg. Having the small dry bag is pretty key for stashing extra layers.

Little ammo cans are great for toiletries, stuff you may need to be dry but accessible throughout the day, libraries, spices, snacks, repair kits.

We brought an empty kitty litter tub (we used the litter and saved the big gallon bucket container) on our last trip and it rigged easily and helped things that could get wet (booze and drinks mostly). After a few days, rigged it as trash to pack out. No remorse when throwing away at the takeout.

I have a dry box the kitchen packs into.

I would say, if buying anything used (like dry bags) make sure things that are advertised as dry really are.

Also, recently found out my dry box isn't really a full dry box in a flip, but all the stuff in it can survive being wet.
luckylauren is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-14-2017   #6
 
Ridgway, Colorado
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 229
Get a day cooler. Mine is a cheap POS and works fine for it's intended use.
In the AM move all food/drinks likely to be needed during the day and some ice to the day cooler. Cover the main cooler with a cold, wet towel and your paco pad. Threaten your crew with lashings for a breach of the main cooler.
rtsideup is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-14-2017   #7
 
Ridgway, Colorado
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 229
Agree with Lauren. An aluminum "dry box" that may or, may not keep the water out is now what we refer to as a "hard sided box".
I've seen more failure than success and don't trust mine anymore.
rtsideup is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-15-2017   #8
 
Quiggle's Avatar
 
Summit County, Colorado
Paddling Since: 92
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 157
Ill start by saying my wife and I are no where near backpacking style when we overnight. we run a 13 ft with a cooler up front and a large kitchen box as a captains seat.

Drybags. We generally have 4 between the two of us. Id encourage watersheds as thy are easier to organize and find things on longer trips but cost much more than roll tops. We use a watershed colorado for all of our clothing, and a Bills bag for our sleeping system (double sleeping bag and full size pillows. Then we each have a small to medium dry bag easily accessible for extra layers and other thing we many want. Pelican cases are also awesome for keeping small things easily assessable. I wouldn't put trash in a nice dry bag, the smell stays and rodents tend to find a way inside. Good rule of thumb everyone on the trip needs a large dry bag and a small/medium dry bag.

Tent/sleeping pads. We carry either a 3 person or 2 person tent and 2 paco pads. We use smaller tents to save space, and generally carry a rain/shade tent to stay out of the elements. Tent lives in its own Drybag, generally with shoes to keep the tent dry and the sand out of our other dry bags. Pacos can double as seat padding on the boat and I won't go camping without one nowadays. Pacos are worth the money.

Rocket boxes. As mentioned above they can be awkward. I really only use the large ones for the groover, but we do have 3 extras we will use for dry food, (the comment above about kitchen boxes staying dry are very true), trash, booze, you name it. I would only buy rocket boxes in person since they vary greatly in price and quality. The smaller boxes are great for first aid, repair, rescue, utensiles, books or even just as a personal dry box. We have about 4 smalls (firstaid,repair and resuce)and two pelican cases.

Mesh Bags. I have two large mesh bags that I use for all kinds of things that can get wet in the boat. Tarps, hand wash, firewood, boxes of beer, empty beers, extra lifejacket, sand stakes, toys....... The list goes on, they are very useful.

There are plenty of ways to get into overnights cheap. Gamma lids for buckets work great as a groover (if allowed) or for trash. My gamma lid bucket goes on every river trip. I used an old radio flyer wagon as my fire pan for years. Got it off of craigslist for 40$, removed the wheels and filled the holes. It meets all the requirements. Your backpacking/car camping stuff will work great and get you out there but you will eventually be looking to upgrade. IE partner stove, blaster, full size camp chairs, tables.........It never ends. Think more car camping that you need to keep dry then backpacking style.
Have a blast!
Quiggle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-15-2017   #9
 
Bozeman, Montana
Paddling Since: 1988
Join Date: Jul 2017
Posts: 71
Awsome replies thanks

Ok so last dumb questions
I have a small "bay" left on my frame in back next to the stern floor it's about 10 inches
Would you do- rocket boxes slings
Water jug slings
Or a combo
Or a small drop bag
Or get rid of it?
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	20170810_180533.jpg
Views:	140
Size:	1.10 MB
ID:	21514  
Pinchecharlie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-15-2017   #10
 
Frisco, Colorado
Paddling Since: 1990
Join Date: Aug 2016
Posts: 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pinchecharlie View Post
Ok so last dumb questions
I have a small "bay" left on my frame in back next to the stern floor it's about 10 inches
Would you do- rocket boxes slings
Water jug slings
Or a combo
Or a small drop bag
Or get rid of it?
I use a small drop bag with a piece of plywood in the bottom, then put two rocket boxes end to end in this spot.
heyben is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Topic Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Mid-July Class III-IV Multi Day Trip Recommendations Cosanga Whitewater Kayaking 2 06-04-2016 10:46 PM
Kayak Recommendations for Multi-day Trip? virg4l Kayaking | Gear Talk 8 12-16-2013 12:33 PM
Multi-Day Gear List(s) windriver Whitewater Kayaking 6 04-26-2010 05:19 PM
Multi-day gear advice Dallas Blaney Whitewater Kayaking 5 02-08-2007 09:16 PM
Any recommendations for a multi-day float? kayceejake Whitewater Kayaking 8 06-20-2006 02:35 PM

» Classified Ads
Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 06:09 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.