An explanation of Sawyer Oars - Page 3 - Mountain Buzz
 

Go Back   Mountain Buzz > Whitewater Boating > Whitewater Rafting > Rafting | Gear Talk


Reply
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Unread 1 Day Ago   #21
 
Hood River, Oregon
Paddling Since: 1994
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by Electric-Mayhem View Post
since killing momentum by back paddling is gonna result in a bad result 9 times out of 10.
This is not the case. Lets just agree to disagree on this one.

You can't push this rapid

__________________
Zachary Collier
Owner/Outiftter
Northwest Rafting Company
zcollier is online now   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Unread 23 Hours Ago   #22
 
Electric-Mayhem's Avatar
 
Lakewood, Colorado
Paddling Since: 1993
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 1,347
Quote:
Originally Posted by zcollier View Post
This is not the case. Lets just agree to disagree on this one.

You can't push this rapid
I was talking about kayaking.
Electric-Mayhem is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 6 Hours Ago   #23
 
Hood River, Oregon
Paddling Since: 1994
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by Electric-Mayhem View Post
I was talking about kayaking.
That makes more sense. I just want to make the case that both pushing and pulling are important skills for whitewater rowing.
__________________
Zachary Collier
Owner/Outiftter
Northwest Rafting Company
zcollier is online now   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Unread 2 Hours Ago   #24
 
GeoRon's Avatar
 
Golden, Colorado
Paddling Since: 1974
Join Date: Jun 2015
Posts: 1,184
Quote:
Originally Posted by zcollier View Post
That makes more sense. I just want to make the case that both pushing and pulling are important skills for whitewater rowing.
For what it is worth, I'll second that. You've got to have every trick in your bag to get the job done as situations require.

Hence, with experience, technical boaters will learn to enjoy big water, such as the Grand, and Grand boaters will learn how to enjoy tight technical situations. Different strokes. Different timing. Different objectives.

I've seen many times the learning experience in both cases; the "deer in the headlights" look.

Hey, I bit my fingernails going through the experiences myself.
GeoRon is online now   Reply With Quote
Unread 1 Hour Ago   #25
 
Salt Lake City, Utah
Paddling Since: 1969
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 377
Indeed. In the "olden times" we called the downstream ferry (pulling, looking over your shoulder or having someone trustworthy in the front of the boat directing you) "Major Powelling'"because that was the technique employed on his expeditions. Absolutely generates more momentum, and also the trickiest to learn in order to hit your spot... Back in the mid-80's I arrived at Crystal on low 20's water (20-22k cfs) and went down to scout the diagonal you need to break through to make the right run and avoid the gynormous hole. (Yes, there's a left run down past Slate Creek but it's SCARY and not recommended for rookies... of which we had several). There was another private there and they had a guy standing on a rock right at the outflow of Crystal drainage, giving arm signals (standard AWA signals) to the boats in his group as they came down the right side of the tongue "Major Powelling" to the sweet spot on the lateral where they could break through. In lower water it's a lot easier to see the lateral you want (third distinct one, as I remember, might have changed) and there are some rocks/pourovers/domers to help orient.
It was a great idea, if you had enough time to coordinate and enough expertise in your group to know what to look for and when. I've used it ever since if any hesitation by anyone on the sticks where to break the diagonal (or which one).
I've seen that diagonal throw "pushers" right back into the hole if not hit with sufficient momentum to break through. And if you make that run sub 10k you need to scrub your speed right afterward to avoid going around the right side of the island or broaching on it...
"Pushers" and "pullers" are one way to pigeonhole techniques, but whether you're doing either one ferry angle and momentum determine what happens to you... and I agree with Electric Mayhem about backpaddling ("pulling") in a kayak - until you start using mid-rapid rocks to eddy hop. Then the ability to lower yourself through the rapid by back-paddling is a really useful skill.
B4otter is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply



Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 08:32 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.