Smoking Food For the River - Mountain Buzz
 



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Old 03-08-2015   #1
 
cedar city, Utah
Join Date: Mar 2008
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Smoking Food For the River

I have established myself as a foodie and others have done the same so I am wondering if anybody has some recipes for smoking foods? We inherited an average bullet style propane and/or charcoal smoker and I am excited to start playing around with the new tool. Anybody have secrets or lessons learned that can help me skip too many painful experiences (worse when you spend 8-12 hours waiting for the food to cook)? Recipes?

Smoking for the first time today and learned quickly the importance of wood chunks versus chips. Its looking the pork butt is still cooking nicely and getting a good bark but takes a lot more work.

Excited to make some homemade sausage, especially andouille, and smoke them. Gonna wait on fish until I get a hang on friendlier, fattier cuts of meat.

Thanks for any input to help me use the tool more effectively.

Phillip

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Old 03-08-2015   #2
 
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ChroniclesofGnarnia, Colorado
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Used to be a pit boss, charcoal and hickory only. 250-275 is ideal. A good rub. Wood for first 1-3 hrs on brisket and shoulders. 1hr for ribs. 10-12 hrs at 250 for brisket/pork. 4-8hrs on ribs. really depends on if you keeping temp at a constant 250 or not. Low and slow. Timing all depends on temps and your smoker. Highly recommend taking notes, easier to hone in your smoker/skills. Also outside temps can have a huge effect on your temps and cooking time. If you do brisket I highly recommend getting the whole thing, fat cap in tact. Also when doing pork butts/shoulder, good tell that the meat is ready is when the bone pops 1/2" out. Mmmmmm
"Trucker Sando"
Pulled pork or brisket
Bun-fries-sauce-meat-sauce-melted jalapeņo cream cheese-slaw-bun


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Old 03-08-2015   #3
 
Bismarck, North Dakota
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I have a different take on it than Jimr, but if you get good results that's all that matters. I prefer a temp around 175°, once the meat is cooked it stops taking smoke flavor. Light smoke is where it's at, heavy billowing smoke will get you creasote and inedible meat. When I switched to an electric smoker I learned I couldn't get a decehnt bark, was always to moist. Went back to charcoal for the heat and an amazin pellet fed smoke generator. If you like the results than your doing it right. Oh yeah the eclectic smoker is great for cheese and veggies.
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Old 03-08-2015   #4
 
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ChroniclesofGnarnia, Colorado
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That's why I love BBQ everyone can crush with different styles, and it is still sooo good. Most my time was in a large North Carolina brick pit. Like you said above type of smoker can have different effects for sure! Shit u can smoke some amazing ribs off an ol classic webber.


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Old 03-08-2015   #5
 
Wondervu, CO, Colorado
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Here are some of my favorites

Canadian Bacon....
Dizzy Pig Cow Lick Canadian Bacon | Dizzy Pig BBQ

Salmon Candy....
Salmon Candy - BarbecueBible.com

One tip a friend of mine uses, keep a bag of yellow onions on hand and every time you fire up the smoker fill the left over space with onions. The resulting slow cooked onions are fantastic. Freeze the leftovers to add to stews, soups and sauces later on.

turkey pastrami, makes great sandwiches..
http://www.primalgrill.org/recipe_de...=3&EpisodeID=1
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Old 03-08-2015   #6
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Missoula, Montana
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See what works for you and learn how to operate your smoker. Trial and error. You will mess some stuff up! Check your smoking items often (but not too often) when you are still learning a recipe...


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Old 03-08-2015   #7
 
Duluth, Minnesota
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Fancy stuff on this thread. Our smoker is a tin shed build about 60 years ago.

Put polish or fish in smoker.

Build a fire on the pan with Popple (oh wait, um, I mean Aspen. Aspen is what you call it when you're doing trim work..or smoking)

Put fire in the shed.

Have a beer.

Check heat by putting your hand on the shed.

Fire isn't quite hot enough...take shovel (the one that's propped up against the door holding it closed) and re-position for more air flow.

Beer.

Put hand on shed for 2 seconds too long..it's hot enough now.

Polish start dripping fat..they're done.

Yeah, we're not very sophisticated but it works for us. Someday if I ever smoke something besides whitefish or polish I'll have to take it a little more seriously.
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Old 03-08-2015   #8
 
Duluth, Minnesota
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Seriously though, fish are really easy to smoke and not really expensive if you screw up.

If you have access to whitefish or anything similar it should be pretty cheap.

Saltwater brine and smoke..that's it.
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Old 03-08-2015   #9
 
cedar city, Utah
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BrianP View Post
Seriously though, fish are really easy to smoke and not really expensive if you screw up.

If you have access to whitefish or anything similar it should be pretty cheap.

Saltwater brine and smoke..that's it.
Looking forward to smoking the trout I start catching this year. Beyond being tasty I think it could make great lunches or appetizers for the river.

Phillip
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Old 03-08-2015   #10
 
cedar city, Utah
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LochsaIdaho View Post
See what works for you and learn how to operate your smoker. Trial and error. You will mess some stuff up! Check your smoking items often (but not too often) when you are still learning a recipe...


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Yeah, the first attempt taught me the reality of it being trial and error. Not too band for first attempt and made some great eastern north carolina pulled pork sandwiches and hush puppies. Family would have disowned me if I didn't go that way the first time.

The "bark" was amazing, which I wasn't expecting for a first attempt.

We make our own sausage so I think that will be the place we explore the most. Its nearly impossible to find proper andouille within a couple hours of us so I can playing with that to dial in my technique.

Phillip
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