Prime rib in a DO? - Page 4 - Mountain Buzz
 



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Old 1 Week Ago   #31
 
Jenks, Oklahoma
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For the record, I hold an Engineering Degree as well. Not sure it helped or hindered my cooking skill set. Most of what I know about cooking came from my Mom and various experiments that went good or bad. I learned from both.

Any way all you real or imagined engineers can have some fun at:

Cooking For Engineers - Step by Step Recipes and Food for the Analytically Minded

or
The Engineer's Cookbook Kindle Edition
by Kari Ojala (Author) from Amazon web site more fun stuff for a cold winter’s day

or my favorite

The Secrets of Cooking Revealed by Shirley O Corriher

I got my hard copy long time ago but I think there is a paper back version on Amazon.

Shirley is a ChE and tells more than most of us want to know, however if you want to know why things cook, and some decent recipes as well, she has the goods.

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Old 1 Week Ago   #32
 
Coeur d'Alene, Idaho
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Originally Posted by [email protected] View Post
A important thing to know is if you do not boil your food bags in a pot with a strainer in it and the pot gets too hot, the bag can stick and melt.
Dinner ruined!!!

I'm not talking about Sous Vide style cooking but reheating pre cooked frozen meals.
I'm not an export on sous vide, but if I'm not mistaken it cooks at a pretty low temperature. Some guys at work have one set up they use to pre-cook steak before grilling, and I think the thing only gets up to around 135 degrees. They actually put the vac sealed bags into a plastic tub, and have a sort wand type device that hangs down into the water and heats it up.
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Old 1 Week Ago   #33
 
Salida, Colorado
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Originally Posted by okieboater View Post
For the record, I hold an Engineering Degree as well. Not sure it helped or hindered my cooking skill set. Most of what I know about cooking came from my Mom and various experiments that went good or bad. I learned from both.

Any way all you real or imagined engineers can have some fun at:

Cooking For Engineers - Step by Step Recipes and Food for the Analytically Minded

or
The Engineer's Cookbook Kindle Edition
by Kari Ojala (Author) from Amazon web site more fun stuff for a cold winter’s day

or my favorite

The Secrets of Cooking Revealed by Shirley O Corriher

I got my hard copy long time ago but I think there is a paper back version on Amazon.

Shirley is a ChE and tells more than most of us want to know, however if you want to know why things cook, and some decent recipes as well, she has the goods.

Cooking for engineers, who would have thunk it.. Priceless, am going to share this with some of my more anal engineering buddies. Thanks !!
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Old 1 Week Ago   #34
 
thornton, Colorado
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Not recommended!

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That would smart a little I'm sure. That did give me an idea thought. I have rosted turkeys in Reynolds Roasting bags and the Turkey was moist and browned. Why can't you roast a prime rib, cornish game hens, beef or pork ribs, corn beef brisket, chuck roasts, etc. in these bags at home and place them in a second bag, leaving them in the first bag with all the juices and freeze, than when you get to camp just boil them in water to thaw and serve. I'm going to try this tomorrow with some pork spair ribs I have. Put a tea spoon of flour in the bottom of the cooking bag, rub some dry rub on the ribs and bake for about 90 minutes at 350°, serve with home made barbecue sauce, potato salad and asparagus. These posts always make me hungry. I had a strong cup of coffee around 10:00 pm and it is keeping me up.
Ok, so I used the Reynolds Roasting Bags on a slab of pork spare ribs, it turned out to be very, very tender and the whole thing fell apart into a big pile of pork and did not brown. I pick the bones out and mixed in some home made barbecue sauce into the pile and had great pork sandwiches. It was a completely different animal than your basic barbecued ribs on the grill, over coals like you would get at Dave's Barbecue Shack. I don't recommend doing this to a nice prime rib roast. PS. I have an AerE degree also.
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Old 1 Week Ago   #35
 
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Originally Posted by John_in_Loveland View Post
I have to call BS on this. Sous Vide is no different than braising, which is a moist heat cooking method. Collagen breaks down in the presence of moisture which is why things like pot roast, short ribs, etc are typically braised like this. Sous Vide takes it a step further by extending the cooking time significantly. Is as MNichols says, you can't over cook things. I cook individual chicken breasts at 150 degree for 70 minutes so they stay juicy.

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Originally Posted by MNichols View Post
Ok, so you are furthering the idea that the vacuum seal doesn't make any difference ? I would think, that especially with a marinade that it would help the meat stay in contact with the juice.

Just reading the SV instruction manual (I'm no expert, just got it for Christmas and my experience is nil) the vacuum is more necessary to get all the meat in contact with the hot water. Because it occurs at such a low temperature, the Delta-T is low and you need that full contact for thermal transfer.


you're correct that vacuums will help with contact for marinades, but that's not as much a function of braising.



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Originally Posted by John_in_Loveland View Post
Granted you don't get the Maillard reaction that browns the meat so you either prebrown it or hit it hot and very fast after cooking.

Talk nerdy to me! Beginning to understand the Maillard reaction (it doesn't "seal the juices in", it caramelizes the sugars in the meat and creates a flavor you don't get by braising/roasting alone) changed the way I cook meat.


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This is a great idea. This x-mas I pre-cooked one in the regular oven to rare, then that evening, took it to x-mas dinner and finished it. It turned out great.
Reverse sear. I did that last Christmas. LOVED it!


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Originally Posted by okieboater View Post
For the record, I hold an Engineering Degree as well. Not sure it helped or hindered my cooking skill set. Most of what I know about cooking came from my Mom and various experiments that went good or bad. I learned from both.
Probably both helped and hindered!!


BS Construction Eng Tech, MS Construction Eng Mgmt.
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Old 1 Week Ago   #36
 
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Originally Posted by MT4Runner View Post
Just reading the SV instruction manual (I'm no expert, just got it for Christmas and my experience is nil) the vacuum is more necessary to get all the meat in contact with the hot water. Because it occurs at such a low temperature, the Delta-T is low and you need that full contact for thermal transfer.


you're correct that vacuums will help with contact for marinades, but that's not as much a function of braising.






Talk nerdy to me! Beginning to understand the Maillard reaction (it doesn't "seal the juices in", it caramelizes the sugars in the meat and creates a flavor you don't get by braising/roasting alone) changed the way I cook meat.




Reverse sear. I did that last Christmas. LOVED it!




Probably both helped and hindered!!


BS Construction Eng Tech, MS Construction Eng Mgmt.



The Vacuum sealer does keep the meat in contact with the water, but you can sour vide in a zip lock. Its just harder to remove the air and keep the product submerged.
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Old 1 Week Ago   #37
 
Hillsboro, Oregon
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We brought a Prime Rib Roast with us on one of our trips last summer.
Cooked it at home to 105-110, pulled it off, let it cool, vacuum packed it and re-froze it.
It was planned as one of our last meals on a Snake trip, so night 4 or 5.
Pulled it out of the cooler, sliced it up, threw the steaks on the grill for a couple minutes, perfection!
We always take Ribeyes on our other river trips, which is the same piece of meat.
I think the frozen Ribeye is a whole lot less work.
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Old 1 Week Ago   #38
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Originally Posted by John_in_Loveland View Post
The Vacuum sealer does keep the meat in contact with the water, but you can sour vide in a zip lock. Its just harder to remove the air and keep the product submerged.
That and ziplocks seem to leak more often than not when submerged.
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Old 1 Week Ago   #39
 
Durango, Colorado
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I bought a vaccumn sealer for $40 this spring it's a no brainier for prepping/ pre cooking food at home and making sure it doesn't "swim" in the cooler. The shape of the bags is also very efficient for packing in the cooler.
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Old 6 Days Ago   #40
 
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vacuum sealing is also great for pulling food out the night before or the morning of and putting it in your drink cooler..and then you don't get spills of food in your drink cooler either.

Last trip I froze my vacuum bags in ice blocks and put the blocks in the cooler. 7 days later I had to chip ice to get to them..so probably a better solution for day 10-15 than day 5-7! The big block was so cold that it refroze the adjacent cube ice we added before launching.
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