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Prime rib in a DO?

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  #21 
6 Days Ago
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 1,120
That would smart I'm sure.

 
Quote:
Originally Posted by noahfecks View Post
boiling your meat in a bag
That would smart a little I'm sure. That did give me an idea thought. I have rosted turkeys in Reynolds Roasting bags and the Turkey was moist and browned. Why can't you roast a prime rib, cornish game hens, beef or pork ribs, corn beef brisket, chuck roasts, etc. in these bags at home and place them in a second bag, leaving them in the first bag with all the juices and freeze, than when you get to camp just boil them in water to thaw and serve. I'm going to try this tomorrow with some pork spair ribs I have. Put a tea spoon of flour in the bottom of the cooking bag, rub some dry rub on the ribs and bake for about 90 minutes at 350°, serve with home made barbecue sauce, potato salad and asparagus. These posts always make me hungry. I had a strong cup of coffee around 10:00 pm and it is keeping me up.
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  #22 
6 Days Ago
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 580
Quote:
Originally Posted by raymo View Post
Ok, I'm game what is sous vide?
At its most fundamental level, sous vide cooking is the process of sealing food in an airtight container—usually a vacuum sealed bag—and then cooking that food in temperature-controlled water. In French, the term translates to "under vacuum," which makes sense. Chefs vacuum seal a protein with marinade, sauce, herbs, or spices and drop it in a large pot of water. There’s no contact with a heated metal surface. No contact with flames or steam or smoke. The water never comes to a boil. Yeah, it's pretty low-key.
A sous vide machine uses a heated metal coil to warm water to a constant temperature, never fluctuating to high or low extremes. This means that the cooking progress is gradual and controlled. Proteins like steak, pork, chicken, and fish cook for elongated periods of time, slowly heating up until the entire piece of protein reaches the temperature of the water. Since the water never goes past the desired temperature of doneness, the meat takes significantly longer to cook (A 12 oz. NY strip takes a little over two hours), but it also means that you’ll never have an overcooked piece of protein.
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  #23 
6 Days Ago
John_in_Loveland's Avatar
Join Date: Jun 2011
Posts: 284
Quote:
Originally Posted by noahfecks View Post
boiling your meat in a bag

I have to call BS on this. Sous Vide is no different than braising, which is a moist heat cooking method. Collagen breaks down in the presence of moisture which is why things like pot roast, short ribs, etc are typically braised like this. Sous Vide takes it a step further by extending the cooking time significantly. Is as MNichols says, you can't over cook things. I cook individual chicken breasts at 150 degree for 70 minutes so they stay juicy.


Granted you don't get the Maillard reaction that browns the meat so you either prebrown it or hit it hot and very fast after cooking.



People ask "aren't you suppose to cook chicken to 165?" Destruction of harmful bacteria is not one size fits all...its a time temperature relationship.


And in case you are wondering, I have a degree in Meat Science so know a little something about this.
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  #24 
6 Days Ago
John_in_Loveland's Avatar
Join Date: Jun 2011
Posts: 284
Quote:
Originally Posted by John_in_Loveland View Post
Personally, I wouldn't use a Dutch Oven. I want the meat to be accessible so I can closely monitor the internal temperature. I use a remote digital thermometer. I place the thermo-couple into the center of the roast and plug it into the read out, thus allowing me to watch the temperature throughout the entire cooking process. That said, I see no reason you couldn't cook it on a grill or Asado cross over an open fire like the Gauchos do in Argentina. You'd just need to have a supply of good wood (not pine) and a sense of adventure. (and patience)



I am planning to build an Asado Cross as my project in my first welding class. Not sure how I would take it on the river but it will be fun to play with at home. Especially if I can convince my wife to let me do a whole lamb.

Wouldn't this be cool on a river trip?
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  #25 
6 Days Ago
Join Date: Aug 2017
Posts: 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by MT4Runner View Post
Or precook with a sous vide, reheat in a 120° bath in camp, then sear/serve?
This is a great idea. This x-mas I pre-cooked one in the regular oven to rare, then that evening, took it to x-mas dinner and finished it. It turned out great.
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  #26 
6 Days Ago
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 580
Quote:
Originally Posted by John_in_Loveland View Post
Wouldn't this be cool on a river trip?
Attachment 41617

Indeed it would, and tasty too !!
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  #27 
6 Days Ago
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 580
Quote:
Originally Posted by John_in_Loveland View Post
I have to call BS on this. Sous Vide is no different than braising, which is a moist heat cooking method.



And in case you are wondering, I have a degree in Meat Science so know a little something about this.

Ok, so you are furthering the idea that the vacuum seal doesn't make any difference ? I would think, that especially with a marinade that it would help the meat stay in contact with the juice. And doesn't Braising generally occur at a higher temperature than in a sous vide tank ?



I don't have a degree in anything other than Engineering, and that rarely interfaces with cooking
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  #28 
5 Days Ago
bighorn1478@msn.com's Avatar
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 1,089
Warning about boiling bag cooking

A important thing to know is if you do not boil your food bags in a pot with a strainer in it and the pot gets too hot, the bag can stick and melt.
Dinner ruined!!!

I'm not talking about Sous Vide style cooking but reheating pre cooked frozen meals.
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  #29 
5 Days Ago
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 242
I think I dated a girl with a degree in meat science.
She was nice.
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  #30 
5 Days Ago
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 1,763
To back up bighorn's warning.

Many years ago I went on a Buffalo River canoe float where every one brought along their favorite dish for a pot luck gravel bar dinner.

Mine was a big ziploc bag full of black beans and ham. Really good comfort food. I froze the ziploc and took the ziploc in my canoe's little cooler. We were short on pans and burners so I stuck my ziploc in an available back pack style boiler filled with water and left the stove area to do a chore.

Some minutes later one of my river buds yelled out Dave, your ziploc is melting. The bottom had melted thru. Fast action by one of the at the stoves cooks rescued my black beans and ham before much got out. I finished up the defrost with a make shift double boiler.

Lesson learned: The seal a meal bags are much better if you use boiling water to defrost. I think ziploc's can work but you have to be very careful that no part of the ziploc touches hot metal. Bighorn's method is good advice.

If space / weight available, I take my double boiler. When not defrosting boil in bags it makes a great warming oven for bacon, sausage or anything else that needs to be served warm.
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