Perimeter line - Mountain Buzz
 



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Old 11-30-2013   #1
 
Salida, Colorado
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Perimeter line

I've read all the posts regarding perimeter lines. But when tying one on, is one continuous rope better than 2, one for each side?

What is the best knot for tying one?

Thanks

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Old 11-30-2013   #2
 
seattle, Washington
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2 15' cam straps
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Old 11-30-2013   #3
 
Taos, New Mexico
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Go get one, long ass piece of 1" tubular webbing. Tie one end onto a 1" cam buckle, string the rest through your "D" rings and pull tight as you can get it through the buckle.
Now you've got a bunch of anchor/ prusik/ tarp rigging etc material, if needed.
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Old 11-30-2013   #4
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Missoula, Montana
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nezbit View Post
Go get one, long ass piece of 1" tubular webbing. Tie one end onto a 1" cam buckle, string the rest through your "D" rings and pull tight as you can get it through the buckle. Now you've got a bunch of anchor/ prusik/ tarp rigging etc material, if needed.
Naw. Use a nice round rope that is easy to grasp when you are swimming back to your boat after being ejected. Don't use some piece of tight ass 1 inch tubular webbing... Sure tubular webbing is awesome to have for many things- that is why I carry it in my rescue kit- not as my perimeter line... My 2 cents.
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Old 11-30-2013   #5
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Use a knot that works for you. There is no "best knot". I have used bowlines, figure 8s, and double fisherman's. A water knot might also work for you.
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Old 11-30-2013   #6
 
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Sandy, Utah
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On rope I use a figure eight knot. I've recently switched to webbing & cam buckle and like it a lot better. Mine is one piece, but you can do two if you want. What you use & how you do it is more personal preference that what's "the best way." Some folks don't like any perimeter line at all.
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Old 12-01-2013   #7
 
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Colorado Plateau Metropolis, Colorado
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Used both rope and webbing. I like webbing more because I can get it pull it tighter to the tubes, and it becomes less of an entrapment issue. In my experience, ropes tend to stretch too much around the perimeter.

I like to use 2 biners and a z-drag setup to get it to the appropriate tension. This also allows me to be able to pull the webbing off the raft, and have an already to go z-drag, with a couple of adjustments for whatever it will be used for.
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Old 12-01-2013   #8
 
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Sandy, Utah
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Here's some pics of how I did mine. Like portercassidy I found that ropes stretched out over time, and I didn't want to (or couldn't) untie the knots to tighten up the rope. I like that I can adjust the tension on the webbing and I can take it off completely if I want. I hadn't thought about the z-drag/rescue usage of the webbing....interesting.
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Old 12-01-2013   #9
 
Salt Lake City, Utah
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Kinda' depends on the purpose of your "perimeter" (aka "chicken") line. As well as where your D-rings are positioned... I run both rope (7/8" diameter on my SD Puma, yes, big thick stuff, nylon braid, could literally moor a battleship) and webbing (17' old school Havasu). No one has mentioned rope, being round, will roll if you step on it... (late night sojourns to grab that last round of brewskis). Yes, you can rig webbing flatter and tighter. Upside down paddle raft = easier to climb aboard bottom and flip back up with rope and some slack on the line. Big rig oar raft, where you're mainly looking to give passengers something to grab onto and don't want entrapment issues = webbing. But splitting hairs compared to other issues, and the only thing to take care with either solution is to keep fairly tight - not drum tight, but snug. Both rope and webbing stretch when wet and under load. A little time on the water will prove how much... bigger issue might be direction of pull on D-rings, and I've seen 250 pound + peeps pull D-rings right off several rafts clambering back aboard. Prol'y better than separated shoulders on the boatfolk, 'though...
Rope also takes longer to dry when you are ready to roll raft...
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Old 12-01-2013   #10
 
cedar city, Utah
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Nylon tubular webbing is hydrophilic and will absorb a ton of water and therefor deal with an excessive amount of stretch and therefor shrinkage as it dries. This is especially an issue for repeated use and multiple day trips. Early in its use it may be appropriate to use as extra webbing for anchors in a rescue situation but that approach becomes less safe and suspect the more time passes.

Polypropylene ropes are hydrophobic and also has a low specific gravity which allows it to float. That is why it has been traditionally used as chicken lines and bowlines. The material is less damaged by UV rays then nylon ropes and webbing. Unfortunately, the durability of poly lines is largely dependent on the source material. Many companies, like hardware stores carry a low-grade rope that will degrade more over time.

Knots: Bowlines are easier to untie which also means they need a backup overhand knot when used for long periods. Figure 8s are bomber but nearly impossible to untie after being weighted aggressively (consider a figure 9, as its easier to untie).

Best knot.....the one you can tie and untie that best serves your purpose. Very user specific.

In general.....I would warn against using your perimeter line for emergency purposes. Mechanical advantages stress ropes dramatically and I would not want something that has been weathered by water and UV to the extent the perimeter line will have been. I would have the proper amount of cordage, rope and webbing in a waterproof bag that is easily accessible. Don't skimp money on it. In emergencies you want the best, most reliable gear possible.

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