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Old 05-03-2018   #1
 
Truckee, California
Paddling Since: 1980
Join Date: Oct 2014
Posts: 21
Overnight in a duckie

I am thinking about taking a duckie down the Illinois at low water, below 500 cfs. I have a single tributary tomcat and would need to load two nights into it. Any suggestions or advice would be appreciated.

I have been down the river a couple of times in a raft. Thanks.

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Old 05-03-2018   #2
 
ColoradoDave's Avatar
 
Western Slope, CO, Colorado
Paddling Since: 2009
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 284
50 - 70 Liter Drybag lashed in behind you containing a large trash bag containing an appropriately rated UL Sleeping Bag, Synthetic. Bivy sack, tarp or UL Tent, Blow up sleeping pad, Pocket Rocket stove, 1 large butane canister, pump water filter, 1 Liter Titanium pot w/ Lid, lightweight plastic mug, 2 Freeze Dried meals, a few light soups like ramen or other for breakfasts, other light food ideas for mid-days, some Everclear in an 8 oz nalgene + herbal tea bags, instant coffee, dry clothes, lighter, first aid, plastic spoon, etc. Should all weigh less than 20#. If more, move your seat forward a few inches.
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Old 05-03-2018   #3
 
bcpnick's Avatar
 
Salt Lake City, Utah
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 199
That's on point if you were climbing up a mountain with all that stuff, but in my experience, you can bring a lot more on a ducky for an overnight or multi-day. Like good old fashioned whiskey, and even some beer! A big hard sided cooler is usually out, but you can easily throw 60-100 pounds or more into that ducky and it'll be fine. My duckies are all tandems but my Sea Eagles list weight capacity of 640 pounds and they are smaller tubes than my trib tandem. Rather than straight up freeze dried backpacker food, go with canned meats and pasta sides. A single burner propane stove with a green bottle is fine. Size is more important than weight. "If it fits, it ships!" Just balance out the load and dry bag what needs to be dry. Save the titanium and everclear for when you actually have to carry the stuff 20 miles.



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Old 05-04-2018   #4
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Posts: 234
Yeah, if it was a 4-5 day trip you'd want to pack light, but an overnighter bring basically whatever you want. If you bring a ton of stuff, you can even out the load by putting one heavier dry bag up in front of your feet.

This is from a 6-7 day trip, where I did pack backpack style. It's zoomed out, but you can see the one dry bag up front with most my gear behind my seat.

https://photos.app.goo.gl/nResaphiJ7qrb1jF2
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Old 05-04-2018   #5
 
Albuquerque, New Mexico
Join Date: Mar 2018
Posts: 106
I have done some ducky trips with 2 in each ducky over night. Helps to have multiple boats to split up some things. Out west on permitted rivers its complicated as you have to have 100lbs of iron for your idiotic fire pan, 12 paddles, 6 life vests...........With out all that it should be easy.
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Old 05-04-2018   #6
 
SLC, Utah
Paddling Since: 1983
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 148
I've done a lot of self support IK, packraft, and kayak trips. In my experience, putting a lot of weight in an IK is possible, but adds a lot to the challenge if you are paddling complicated water. For my 1 person Pack cat (and packraft and kayak...), I don't like carrying more than about 50 lbs (I weigh 160#) for something like a low-water MFS. I'd carry a little more for something easy like the San Juan. A 2 person boat is capable of more, but again more weight slows it down a lot. I like to put weight both in front of and behind me, as low and close to me as I can get it (not out on the ends) and adjust my seat and/or the load to make the boat look level. I usually carry one big dry bag and then a smaller duffle with things that can get wet (water container, fuel canisters, spare paddle, collapsable bucket, etc.). I like going backpacking style and would rather stay out longer and go more places and sacrifice some beer, dutch ovens, heavy food, a big tent, etc. And 50 lbs is a lot more than I'd carry in a backpack.
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Old 05-04-2018   #7
 
Walterville, Oregon
Paddling Since: 1977
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 779
Illinois low water = go light. The Middle Fork Salmon at low water is nothing like the Illinois at low water. Sweep boats still do the MFS at low water. The Illinois is far more technical. You will probably have a long portage at Greenwall if the water is much lower than 400 cfs because of rock seives. I would consider taking 3 nights instead of 2 unless you like really long days on the river. The river is very slow below Collier Cr.
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Old 05-04-2018   #8
 
SLC, Utah
Paddling Since: 1983
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 148
I've done a lot of self support IK, packraft, and kayak trips. In my experience, putting a lot of weight in an IK is possible, but adds a lot to the challenge if you are paddling complicated water. For my 1 person Pack cat (and packraft and kayak...), I don't like carrying more than about 50 lbs (I weigh 160#) for something like a low-water MFS. I'd carry a little more for something easy like the San Juan. A 2 person boat is capable of more, but again more weight slows it down a lot. I like to put weight both in front of and behind me, as low and close to me as I can get it (not out on the ends) and adjust my seat and/or the load to make the boat look level. I usually carry one big dry bag and then a smaller duffle with things that can get wet (water container, fuel canisters, spare paddle, collapsable bucket, etc.). I like going backpacking style and would rather stay out longer and go more places and sacrifice some beer, dutch ovens, heavy food, a big tent, etc. And 50 lbs is a lot more than I'd carry in a backpack.
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Old 05-08-2018   #9
 
Arnold, California
Join Date: Dec 2017
Posts: 183
I would lean more toward 30# than 60#. For instance I'd stick with the pocket rocket stove but a SS pot is fine. I also put my sleeping bag in a lightweight dry bag inside the main dry bag. The ones with cinch straps that purge air are fantastic. I use a Thermarest style pad instead of a paco or closed cell foam.
I avoid the freeze dried food as I find it doesn't give me enough calories. There are lots of other lightweight options however.


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Old 05-08-2018   #10
 
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Seattle, Washington
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 512
low water illinois is a great trip. steep, technical, lots of beaches, and usually SUN!

I rig a watershed chatooga in the bow and a colorado behind me in a Lynx 1. It's a hole punching machine! love running a gear boat in whitewater.

I am not a small person and usually have 80lbs of gear plus me. At 600 we were still able to get left at GW for the sneak.

an ik makes a super cot, btw ...

have a great trip!
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