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Old 01-27-2017   #1
SHADOWS
 
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Oar preference

13 foot NRS otter mostly used with the frame for fly fishing in shallow water during the fall. I'm looking for suggestions on Oars in regards to comparisons between inexpensive Carlisle and upper end or such as lightweight Sawyer's. Appreciate any feedback you give me / Shadows.

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Old 01-27-2017   #2
 
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Originally Posted by Shadows View Post
13 foot NRS otter mostly used with the frame for fly fishing in shallow water during the fall. I'm looking for suggestions on Oars in regards to comparisons between inexpensive Carlisle and upper end or such as lightweight Sawyer's. Appreciate any feedback you give me / Shadows.
If your just fishing class 1-2 then 9 foot Carlisle oars wold be a good fit.
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Old 01-28-2017   #3
 
Aurora, Colorado
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I used inexpensive Carlisles for many years, both on my rig, and on commercial rigs. They work just fine. They're cheap enough you don't really care about beating them up.

Several years ago I started using Cataracts commercially, and liked them a lot. They're more expensive, and need refinishing from time to time. Commercially that meant every season if you wanted to keep them in good shape, and every other if you were willing to let them go far before refinishing.

Recently I got composite Sawyers- not sure what letters- MGX? The stiff ones. They have rope wrap. I'm not super fond of them, but in fairness I haven't had a lot of time to dial everything in together. The rope wrap doesn't glide in the locks, and they seem heavy for a $500 pair of composite oars- especially in the blades. I'm not 100% convinced that I can't improve the performance a little with some geometry tinkering on the locks/towers, but the rope wrap definitely hinders.

If I were going to be rowing a 13' raft all day fishing, I'd go with some 8'6" Cataracts with plastic sleeves.
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Old 01-28-2017   #4
 
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Originally Posted by Soup76 View Post
If your just fishing class 1-2 then 9 foot Carlisle oars wold be a good fit.
I couldn't disagree with this more. A rower will take 2 or 3 times as many strokes rowing for fishing (assuming your fishing out of the boat) than on a WW run. The balance is a lot more noticeable and a lot more critical to reducing fatigue. Yes Carlisle will work, anything will work but in my opinion, oars are the place to spend money. The difference between an aire boat and a tributary is less important to me than is carlisle to composite, or wood.

I like sawyers, but it really doesn't matter. I think sawyers are balanced a little heavier, I agree they feel heavier in the hand, one reason why I add a little weight inside the handle. I'm not sure if it's the reason but sawyers are sized for 30" blades where carlisle and cataract use 27" blades (I think that's what they are, shorter anyways). My feeling is that makes the blades a little heavier and maybe the shafts a slightly heavier, not sure. I like the flex of the sawyers but most importantly I like that when the finish fails, they do not shed fiberglass, at least no where nearly as badly as catracts do. That's probably the difference maker for me.

I agree on sawyers rope wrap, it's very abrasive and takes a while to wear in. I have 3 pairs and the old two have not only smoother rope, but slightly thinner rope. My newer ones would barely work in Cobra locks. They work much better in superstrons. Try waxing the rope, that helps a lot. I just used yellow ski wax. That helped a lot too.

Plastic sleeves are not a bad call on a fishing rig. Or better yet the pro-lok system of locks and sleeves. I'd definitely go that route if I were starting over but I'm having a hard time switching two boats and cutting off 6 rope wraps...

Edit - I should add that I do like the dampening affect that I feel rope wraps give as well. It's not huge but they feel a little softer to me and are definitely quieter.
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Old 01-28-2017   #5
 
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I use counterbalanced, rope wrapped Cataract oars with Carlisle blades. No complaints. For a 13 foot raft I'd go 8.5-9 foot depending on your frame width, your rowing height, and your body size. I prefer longer oars, so I'd choose 9 footers myself.

Right now you can get 8.5 or 9 foot rope wrapped Cataract oar shafts on backcountry.com for $144.95/each which is a $30 savings over other places. If you want counterbalanced & rope wrap, they are $184.95/each on backcountry.com

I got my oars from backcountry.com and was glad to save some $$. Since backcountry.com has a distribution center where I live, I could order them online, and pick them up. I have used the plastic sleeves in the past with no problems.

Have fun with your raft!
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Old 01-28-2017   #6
 
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Oar preference

I just ordered a set of internally counterbalanced cataract oars with sleeves and convertible oar rights. Should save a lot of rowing fatigue on a 3/30 GC trip. My older 9.5 will be spares. And no, they do not oxidize and leave fiber glass splinters like the '90s version did.


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Old 01-28-2017   #7
 
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Originally Posted by elkhaven View Post
I couldn't disagree with this more. A rower will take 2 or 3 times as many strokes rowing for fishing (assuming your fishing out of the boat) than on a WW run. The balance is a lot more noticeable and a lot more critical to reducing fatigue. Yes Carlisle will work, anything will work but in my opinion, oars are the place to spend money. The difference between an aire boat and a tributary is less important to me than is carlisle to composite, or wood.

I like sawyers, but it really doesn't matter. I think sawyers are balanced a little heavier, I agree they feel heavier in the hand, one reason why I add a little weight inside the handle. I'm not sure if it's the reason but sawyers are sized for 30" blades where carlisle and cataract use 27" blades (I think that's what they are, shorter anyways). My feeling is that makes the blades a little heavier and maybe the shafts a slightly heavier, not sure. I like the flex of the sawyers but most importantly I like that when the finish fails, they do not shed fiberglass, at least no where nearly as badly as catracts do. That's probably the difference maker for me.

I agree on sawyers rope wrap, it's very abrasive and takes a while to wear in. I have 3 pairs and the old two have not only smoother rope, but slightly thinner rope. My newer ones would barely work in Cobra locks. They work much better in superstrons. Try waxing the rope, that helps a lot. I just used yellow ski wax. That helped a lot too.

Plastic sleeves are not a bad call on a fishing rig. Or better yet the pro-lok system of locks and sleeves. I'd definitely go that route if I were starting over but I'm having a hard time switching two boats and cutting off 6 rope wraps...

Edit - I should add that I do like the dampening affect that I feel rope wraps give as well. It's not huge but they feel a little softer to me and are definitely quieter.
Jesus Christ. The person asked for opinions on oars. I gave mine. I own Carlisle and Cataract oars. Have rowed Sawyers several times. Not my favorite. To each there own.

As for strokes.... it's all in the the person rowing their craft. Perhaps I just should have said "9 footers" and left it at that.
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Old 01-28-2017   #8
 
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Originally Posted by Soup76 View Post
Jesus Christ. The person asked for opinions on oars. I gave mine. I own Carlisle and Cataract oars. Have rowed Sawyers several times. Not my favorite. To each there own.

As for strokes.... it's all in the the person rowing their craft. Perhaps I just should have said "9 footers" and left it at that.
I get it, I didn't call you a loser. I also gave my opinion, which obviously differs from yours. My issue was "if all you're going to do is fish" than Carlisle are fine. I DON'T AGREE, as I said, rowing for fishing is much more active than rowing ww. That's it.

I'd guess if you ration your strokes with your fishing buddies, you're not a hot commodity in the boat...

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Old 01-28-2017   #9
 
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I get it, I didn't call you a loser. I also gave my opinion, which obviously differs from yours. My issue was "if all you're going to do is fish" than Carlisle are fine. I DON'T AGREE, as I said, rowing for fishing is much more active than rowing ww. That's it.

I'd guess if you ration your strokes with your fishing buddies, you're not a hot commodity in the boat...

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We agree to disagree. If you find the right eddy you don't have to row half of those strokes.
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Old 01-28-2017   #10
 
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As long as that eddy is within casting distance of the fish... otherwise it's just a break for the rower. Don't bother looking me up next time you're in the bozone.

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