Aire 146DD Frame Width & Outfitting - Page 2 - Mountain Buzz
 



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Old 1 Week Ago   #11
 
Electric-Mayhem's Avatar
 
Lakewood, Colorado
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I measured my frame yesterday...and its 69" at the widest part of the side rail and 73" to the outside of the oar tower mount.

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Old 1 Week Ago   #12
 
Hailey, Idaho
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I have never cut a DRE frame, but I did cut my NRS frame a couple years back to accomodate a slightly smaller boat that I got. I guess my takeaway, for me personally: measure three times and cut once!

A good handy-person can figure it out, but I certainly regretted rushing through a couple of pieces. Firstly, I didn't get the cuts super square (should have been easy -- I just rushed it). Secondly, the NRS pipe ends for the cross-bars need two holes to accept the bolt that holds the pipe ends on... and those two holes need to be parallel on both ends of the cross bar, which can actually be a tricky thing to get right. Again, I rushed that and figured "good enough" and now for the rest of its life, it's a little bit... um... "crooked". Works fine but I personally would recommend being more careful than I was! Worth the extra time to keep your frame square and straight, and they are expensive parts to replace. Have fun!
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Old 1 Week Ago   #13
 
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Lakewood, Colorado
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UseTheSpinMove View Post
I have never cut a DRE frame, but I did cut my NRS frame a couple years back to accomodate a slightly smaller boat that I got. I guess my takeaway, for me personally: measure three times and cut once!

A good handy-person can figure it out, but I certainly regretted rushing through a couple of pieces. Firstly, I didn't get the cuts super square (should have been easy -- I just rushed it). Secondly, the NRS pipe ends for the cross-bars need two holes to accept the bolt that holds the pipe ends on... and those two holes need to be parallel on both ends of the cross bar, which can actually be a tricky thing to get right. Again, I rushed that and figured "good enough" and now for the rest of its life, it's a little bit... um... "crooked". Works fine but I personally would recommend being more careful than I was! Worth the extra time to keep your frame square and straight, and they are expensive parts to replace. Have fun!
DRE is a bit easier since they use the fittings that go outside the tube instead of slipping inside. Definitely a lot more fudge room with that style. They cross drill holes in the Hollaender fittings to keep them together so its as easy as cutting the cross rails to the length you want, fit everything together with the set screws tightened and then just use the cross drilled fittings as their own jigs for the bolts to go through.

NRS style, along with Whitewater Machineworks, style frame fittings are definitely tricky to line up the holes. Certainly try to get it as straight as possible on the ends of the pipes...though I've struggled even when I'm trying. Probably better to use a chop saw or something that can hold then at a 90 degree angle...I just used my Portaband Saw.

I've found that rather then trying to drill both holes in hopes that they line up... drill one hole lined up as best you can and then put the fitting on and use it to line up the 2nd hole. In other words, drill through the first hole and the fitting to make the 2nd hole.

An alternative is to just drill new holes. NRS actually has an option to purchase their Lo-Pro fittings with no holes...and then you just drill all the way through with the rails slipped over the fitting. You can emulate this by just drilling a second set of holes in the fitting that already has been setup once. Just make sure you are a half inch either side of the original holes so you don't get overlap. I think this might be how they do it at the factory too...or at least used to. I cannibalized an old frame for its fittings and foot bar a while back and the holes definitely weren't in the same place from fitting to fitting.

I've always though that NRS should sell a jig for marking and drill the holes to fit their fittings. Cut the pipes to length, attach the jig that lines the holes up perfectly, drill the holes...bolt it together. Wouldn't be hard to make one yourself.
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Old 1 Week Ago   #14
 
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Kalispell, Montana
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Originally Posted by Electric-Mayhem View Post
I've found that rather then trying to drill both holes in hopes that they line up... drill one hole lined up as best you can and then put the fitting on and use it to line up the 2nd hole. In other words, drill through the first hole and the fitting to make the 2nd hole.
I think what UseTheSpinMove was saying is that it's even harder to line up the LoPro on the other end so both of its holes line up.
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Old 1 Week Ago   #15
 
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Originally Posted by MT4Runner View Post
I think what UseTheSpinMove was saying is that it's even harder to line up the LoPro on the other end so both of its holes line up.
ah...yeah... lining up each end so the fittings bolt on straight is definitely non-trivial too. Easy enough with a long piece of angle iron (or aluminum) to mark a line each end for that though.

It never ceases to amaze me how seemingly simple tasks like this get complicated and weird very quickly once you look at them with more detail.
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Old 1 Week Ago   #16
 
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Originally Posted by Electric-Mayhem View Post
ah...yeah... lining up each end so the fittings bolt on straight is definitely non-trivial too. Easy enough with a long piece of angle iron (or aluminum) to mark a line each end for that though.
Or bolt both lopros to a side bar with the side bars sitting on equal-height blocks (or all sitting on the floor on their ubolts).

Quote:
It never ceases to amaze me how seemingly simple tasks like this get complicated and weird very quickly once you look at them with more detail.
And this coming from someone who has built things before. Imagine if you only used your drill for mounting a few pictures on the wall.

and now we see why machinists make good money!
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Old 1 Week Ago   #17
 
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Originally Posted by MT4Runner View Post
Or bolt both lopros to a side bar with the side bars sitting on equal-height blocks (or all sitting on the floor on their ubolts).
I guess...still super hard to figure out where the hole is in the LoPro fitting accurately. Your way works great if you are drilling a new hole all the way through...but if you are trying to line up with an existing hole in the LoPro it involves a lot of measuring and crossing of fingers that you did it right. Only drilling the one hole in to match one side of the fitting and then drill through that hole, through the fitting and through the other side is a great way to guarantee the bolt will go through at least.

Luckily the OP has a DRE frame with speedrail fittings...so just cut the cross pipes all the the same length, assemble the frame and then drill the holes for the bolts. It is definitely MUCH simpler having the fittings on the outside of the tube rather then slipped inside the pipe/tube.


Quote:
And this coming from someone who has built things before. Imagine if you only used your drill for mounting a few pictures on the wall.

and now we see why machinists make good money!
yep... or at least SHOULD make great money. From talking to many machinists and fabricators, mostly clients truly don't appreciate the time it takes to get things right and often are shocked at what it costs and want it reduced. That isn't taking into account the tools of the trade either. I definitely was like that at one point till I really started doing stuff for myself. I'm certainly on the slower side and enthusiastic amateur and the pro's do it way faster and better...but most guys who do this for a living aren't getting rich off of it unfortunately. Seems to me being a programmer is a better use of your time these days too...since most professional machining is done by CNC and new young manual machinists are much rarer these days. Even the CNC side is underated though. People think you just design something in Solidworks or Fusion 360 and upload it into the CNC and the machine figures it all out... but while super advanced and amazing...they are also completely dumb and will only do what you tell them and potential for catastrophe is high if you aren't careful (lots of evidence on Youtube).

Sorry... its not a forum thread without going off on a tangent...right?
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