Straight vs Bent Shaft Paddle? - Page 3 - Mountain Buzz
 



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Old 4 Weeks Ago   #21
 
Durango, Colorado
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One of the ideas behind a bigger offset is that it encourages / forces you into using more torso rotation, thus giving you more power. However, most people aren't thinking about proper torso rotation in the middle of a Class V, so high offset paddles aren't for everyone.

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Old 4 Weeks Ago   #22
 
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Golden, Colorado
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Interesting.

Is the torso rotation the result of a need to accommodate a 45 degree offset of the blade which was standard then??????

Haven't thought about it till now but having trophied slalom racing in the latest 70's is torso rotation strictly to accommodate a 45 offset of the blade which was standard (then).............. That is, are you just winding up your abdomen to compromise for the twist of the wrist.

Interesting but probably not. That power from your mid-section can not be replaced by blade angle considerations.

What is the preferred blade angle for racers? Love to know what that is?
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Old 4 Weeks Ago   #23
KSC
 
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As much as I find this video annoying, EJ nailed the answers to the various paddle questions in this video. As far as I'm concerned those are the answers, discussion over. Someone should edit it down to the 2 minutes worth of salient points and I'd be less annoyed.

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Old 4 Weeks Ago   #24
 
Durango, Colorado
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GeoRon View Post
Interesting.

Is the torso rotation the result of a need to accommodate a 45 degree offset of the blade which was standard then??????

Haven't thought about it till now but having trophied slalom racing in the latest 70's is torso rotation strictly to accommodate a 45 offset of the blade which was standard (then).............. That is, are you just winding up your abdomen to compromise for the twist of the wrist.

Interesting but probably not. That power from your mid-section can not be replaced by blade angle considerations.

What is the preferred blade angle for racers? Love to know what that is?
Most slalom paddlers I've ordered paddles for prefer a 45 or 60 degree, but some go all the way up to 90. More torso rotation = more power because you're using more of your core.
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Old 4 Weeks Ago   #25
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by storm11 View Post
Most slalom paddlers I've ordered paddles for prefer a 45 or 60 degree, but some go all the way up to 90. More torso rotation = more power because you're using more of your core.
I paddle with a couple old school boaters who use custom order 90 degree offset carbon fiber Werner paddles.

My paddle could very well be 30 degree. For some reason I had it in my head that is was 15, but it is definitely the same as the vast majority of the paddles on the water. I just replace it without thought as long as it matches.
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Old 4 Weeks Ago   #26
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KSC View Post
As much as I find this video annoying, EJ nailed the answers to the various paddle questions in this video. As far as I'm concerned those are the answers, discussion over. Someone should edit it down to the 2 minutes worth of salient points and I'd be less annoyed.]
Thanks!!

Long but so worth the watch. I've done the re-grip on the shaft to get the longer blade stroke for rolling. That was the first time someone talked me though it like that!
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I saw someone do it on youtube.
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Old 4 Weeks Ago   #27
 
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EJ's video is brilliant!! How to dial in to perfection!

I have a few point of perfection to improve his perspective.

EJ does not mention small diameter shafts. It performs much of the same purposes as a bent shaft.

EJ mentions electrical tape. Bogus BS. Never subject you most prized shaft to damage. Perhaps EJ and his sponsored young ones can deal with damaged shafts protected by E-tape but fuck that. Protect a $3 to $5 hundred dollar investment. In transit, a quality blade should never be out of padded storage.

If you want to truly calibrate your shaft to your grip use wax and not tape. It once was Sex Wax for surf boarding for kayak paddles. That did not work for kayaking. Use in Colorado Extra Blue nordic wax, thickly. You will in no time dial in your finger nail prints to a precise location on your shaft, believe it or not. Your mind will know you paddle angle precisely because your impression of you fingers(prints) is in you paddle. Doubt me. Try spending your pleasure squirt boating the numbers on the Ark when you really want to know at any angle of disorientation how to recover and do your next move of pure pleasure. Ya hoo. Or even more importantly, how to pull your ass out of a very previous pure pleasure.

More thoughts later. Thank you EJ for your thought out presentation.
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Old 4 Weeks Ago   #28
 
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Durango, Colorado
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@GeoRon Most racers prefer 60-90 degree offsets because it’s more ergonomic with rotation. Rotation helps to protect the shoulders, get more power from strokes, and to set up better for impromptu maneuvers.
The rotator cuff wears out quickly with the typical “boxing nun” or “kayaking T-Rex” movement that most kayakers use. Ask any long-time recreational boater how their shoulders feel and it’s readily apparent.
By using rotation instead of arms, you can reduce the strain on your shoulders and protect yourself better from dislocation. You also end up in a better position to make effective turning strokes, like a Duffek or pry, using core muscle groups than you would with a static core.
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Old 4 Weeks Ago   #29
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Duckins View Post
Just getting back from a trip and was feeling like my bent shaft Powerhouse is out of date. General consensus from our guides was that bent shafts are helpful if you have tendonitis problems (I would agree based on past experience).

Sounds like the small diameter straight shaft is most en vogue now.

You should buy all of them from Backcountry.com, take them out for a demo in some manky gnar, send them back, and then buy the one you like when they put it on GearTrade.com.
Best advise yet! Bent shafts are good for tendonitis. Small shafts are good for small hands. Screw Backcountry!
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Old 4 Weeks Ago   #30
KSC
 
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Small shafts are probably a sensitive topic in the Jackson family.

I forgot about the tape thing - I've never tried it because wax has always worked well for me.

I don't really understand the mechanics behind why a small shaft would be better, but am curious about it - I know people who prefer them.
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