RRFW Riverwire – Hualapai Nation River Trip Camping Permit Fee Increased - Mountain Buzz
 

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Old 1 Week Ago   #1
 
Tom Martin's Avatar
 
Flagstaff, Arizona
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RRFW Riverwire – Hualapai Nation River Trip Camping Permit Fee Increased

RRFW Riverwire – Hualapai Nation River Trip Camping Permit Fee Increased
April 13, 2019

On April 10, 2019, the Hualapai Reservation Tribal Council voted to increase the camping fee for river runners from $100 per river trip to $100 per person. This fee increase impacts all river trips on the 109.4-mile-long border of the Hualapai Nation where reservation lands meet the Colorado River in the Grand Canyon.

The increase in the cost of a camping permit comes on the heels of a change in the members of the Hualapai Nation Tribal Council. The previous Council had approved a decrease of the fee from $100 per person to $100 per river trip in January of 2019.

According to Tribal officials, the number of river runners who purchased camping permits greatly increased after the fee decrease in January was announced, with almost full compliance of all river trips. They also stated that camping permits issued prior to the increase in fees April 10, 2019, will be honored

On June 1, 2018, the Hualapai Nation Game and Fish Department issued a public notice about camping on Hualapai land along the Colorado River in Grand Canyon. The notice stated that river runners who pay a $100 per person fee would be allowed to camp, stop for lunch, and visit riverside attraction sites anywhere along the Colorado River that abuts Hualapai Nation land. The Hualapai Nation touches the edge of the Colorado River from River Mile 164.5 to River Mile 273.9 on the east side of the river, known as “river left” when looking downstream.

According to Hualapai Nation officials, Tribal Police plan to check river runners found camping on Tribal lands for the appropriate permits this summer. Anyone found on the Hualapai Reservation where it meets the Colorado River that does not have a valid camping permit may be subject to impoundment of all their river and camping equipment, arrest, and face immediate prosecution in Tribal Court.

River Runners For Wilderness Council Member Tom Martin was saddened by the change. “While we greatly respect the Council and support a permit system for camping on Reservation land, we find this fee increase unfortunate. It was very encouraging to see river runners comply with the lower fee permit. Raising the fees to such a high level for one- or two-nights of camping will simply cause river runners to camp on the other side of the river in this area, decreasing tribal revenue. We certainly understand if river runners decide to forgo this purchase and camp on river right.”

River runners are encouraged to write the Hualapai Tribal Council, respectfully encouraging the Council to reconsider this action. A low-cost fee ensures compliance with Tribal laws and raises awareness of Tribal sovereignty. Comments should be respectful and avoid personal attacks to uphold Hualapai values and respect for one another.

Comments may be mailed to
Hualapai Tribal Chairman Dr. Damon Clarke
PO Box 179, Peach Springs, AZ 86434
Or by email to [email protected] and [email protected]

River runners are reminded that the boundary between the Hualapai Tribe and the National Park Service has yet to be decided in court. That means that if you step off your boat onto dry land between River Mile 164.5 and River Mile 273.9 on the east side of the river, you are on Hualapai Tribal land, as per the Hualapai Tribe. According to Tribal officials, river runners who are found camping, having lunch or visiting attraction sites along the south side of the Colorado River on Tribal lands are committing trespass if they do not have a valid permit.

In July of 2017, Tribal Chairman Dr. Damon Clark announced the Nation would be offering camping permits for river runners. He also stated river runners who are scouting rapids may continue to do so without any sort of permit.

River runners who chose not to camp or stop for lunch on river left between River Mile 164.5 and River Mile 273.9 are not required to pay the above fees. Should river runners still desire to purchase a Hualapai Nation river camping permit, they may be obtained by calling the Hualapai Nation Game and Fish Department at 928-769-2227 or 928-769-1122 or by email at [email protected]
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Old 6 Days Ago   #2
DailyBoater
 
Wheredat, USA
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You were suckered in and you've been played, Mr. Grand Canyon.
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Old 6 Days Ago   #3
 
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Flagstaff, Arizona
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Mr. Ryan, Great to hear from you. Thank you so much for that stick in my eye.

Yes, I agree that while the low cost program was in place, about 90 do-it-yourself river trips achieved over a $100,000 savings.

I apologize for not paying as much attention to this as I should. Working with Glen Canyon to get some better camps in lower Cataract Canyon, rolling out the Ark Guide, doing oral histories to preserve DIY paddling history, writing Congress folks about the latest private tour business attempt to pull yet more river access to them, and seeking clarification on some Grand Canyon river running issues have kept me hopping. Oh. Then there is the writing about river history... the behind the scenes management stories never before published are amazing.

So how have you been? Besides another stick in my eye, what else have you been doing?

Hope all's well, Cordially yours, Tom
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Old 5 Days Ago   #4
 
Jenks, Oklahoma
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Hi Tom,

Keep doing what you do for all of us private boaters.

Ignore the stick tossers !

david reid
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Old 5 Days Ago   #5
 
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Kalispell, Montana
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Interesting that their fees are such a roller-coaster.


Any insight as to why?


(and yes, I acknowledge that they're a sovereign nation and it's their right to do so, just interested in the why's if they are known)
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Old 5 Days Ago   #6
 
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Fort Fun, Colorado
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Quote:
Originally Posted by johnryan View Post
You were suckered in and you've been played, Mr. Grand Canyon.
I've known Tom for going on 25 years. I don't always see eye to eye with him and sometimes question his approach - but not many have done more for The Canyon. Really, what have you done for The Canyon, for river runners, for increasing non-commercial access....
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Old 5 Days Ago   #7
 
Fraser, Colorado
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Yes, ignore the stick tossers!
Appreciate all the work you do for private boaters, and the Grand Canyon, such as helping spear head the fight against the tram.

I am still happy to give the benefit of the doubt, and stay off the disputed land, until the dispute is resolved. I see no reason to inflame things, when there is still a lot of great camping on the opposite side of the river.

Anyway, thanks for letting us know, Tom!
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Old 4 Days Ago   #8
 
Boulder, Colorado
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Let's not tar and feather the messenger here, let alone ignore Tom's tireless advocacy for river access. It's important to also acknowledge this reasoned response to the tribal decision, made not more than a few months after the GCPBA was unethically inflaming things by outright rcommending river runners trespass on their lands as well as questioning their territorial claims with junk science.
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Old 4 Days Ago   #9
 
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C. Springs, Colorado
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Quote:
Originally Posted by waterdude View Post
Let's not tar and feather the messenger here, let alone ignore Tom's tireless advocacy for river access. It's important to also acknowledge this reasoned response to the tribal decision, made not more than a few months after the GCPBA was unethically inflaming things by outright rcommending river runners trespass on their lands as well as questioning their territorial claims with junk science.
Couldn't of said it better myself. Thanks Tom for doing what you do.
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Old 4 Days Ago   #10
 
Jenks, Oklahoma
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The tribal lands are what they ended up with after non native Americans and/or Europeans came along with a lot more military power than spears and arrows. So be it.

As a private rafter and long retired business person, my take on this camp fee issues and also the ridiculous diamond Creek take out facilities and fees charged to private boaters who use the Grand Canyon for recreation and support it with our tax dollars is just do not use the tribal camp areas or diamond creek. The Grand Canyon is a benefit we got from nature but the US taxpayers make the Grand Canyon the recreational jewel it is today. Without the US Park Service, my bet is the Grand Canyon area would be a trash dump.

as a business person, my theory is build and maintain facilities that the purchasing public will want to use and charge a reasonable fee to maintain, improve facilities to the point a profit can be made and prices are still attractive to the public.

Do not use the tribal facilities especially Diamond Creek and with all the loss of income, my bet is the tribe (s) will feel the loss of income and do what is reasonable.

My opinion as a person who has used diamond creek take out is that take out is about the most unfriendly place a boater could use. We boaters pay big money to endure a painful experience. The tribe does maintain a road that most vehicles either cannot use or else a few trips tear up the vehicle. The ramp is as basic as it gets and there is nothing there to make the unloading process a bit more easier. I could give a bunch of really easy improvements to diamond creek access that would cost very little to the tribe but generate more income for them.

It appears to me all the tribe is doing is ripping off boaters who use diamond creek.

It is the right of the tribe (s) to set fees for use of their land and I support that right.

It is also the right of the public who pay taxes to make a Grand Canyon float the awesome experience that the float is to bypass tribal land and float on down to a US Tax payer funded take out. If people want to pay a ripoff fee to the tribes for diamond creek access or camp on a few sites the tribe (s) own that is their choice.

There is a rule of thumb idea for retail that states do not price your product to the point it cannot be afforded and another one that states give the customer a quality product for the price. The tribal authorities have violated these concepts about as much as they can be violated.

Again I support the tribe (s) right to maintain and price tribal lands. I also support the right of Grand Canyon floaters to choose to float by tribal facilities to use public facilities that are much more boater friendly and reasonably priced.
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