Rattlesnake bite treatment on the river - Page 5 - Mountain Buzz
 



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Old 1 Week Ago   #41
 
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Bend, Oregon
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Lots of great discussion here! Certainly a lot to learn from others in this community. I appreciate the feedback.

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Old 1 Week Ago   #42
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Weld county, Colorado
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+1 for them crazy old bastards out on the pawnee. It seems an antihistamine like benadryl is a helpful part of a first aid kit. I'm going to make sure I replace my sharpy every year.
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Old 1 Week Ago   #43
 
St. George, Utah
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[QUOTE=fcpnorman;774553]If a bite occurs:
Keep the person calm
Keep the bite location below the level of their heart
Apply a dry dressing bandage
Mark the area of the swelling with a pen to track the swelling
Apply an ice pack to help reduce pain and swelling
A constricting band can be applied above the bite sit- not a tourniquet- ( not totally proven to work).
Antihistamine may not help much- the venom from a rattlesnake is a neurotoxin, however the person may release histamines in response to the bite.
Get the patient to an emergency department as quickly as possible.


May want to check your source on the ice thing. Constricting band is not recommended as well.



From the website. https://www.snakebitefoundation.org/blog


Good information there on antihistamine use as well.


Ice: Do not use ice for snakebites! Ice causes the smaller blood vessels to constrict and when combined with viper venoms it can produce dramatic tissue damage. Again, better to let the swelling happen and focus on getting to a hospital.
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Old 1 Week Ago   #44
SarahofTheWaves
 
FoCo,NoCo, Colorado
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Ordered an InReach mini earlier this week due to this thread. Seems like someone on the trip always had one. Well, now I will as well. It was $300 REI.


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Old 1 Week Ago   #45
 
Portland, Oregon
Paddling Since: 2002
Join Date: May 2020
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Same here - InReach Mini on order from REI as we speak. That article from the Bend paper is a bit chilling - I've camped many times at that very spot (Harris) on the lower Deschutes.
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Old 1 Week Ago   #46
 
thornton, Colorado
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I agree in this age of advanced and high tech electronics and satellite systems, too not have an emergency(SOS) personal locator transmitter(ELT, PLB, etc) or sat-phone when venturing into remote areas with family and friends is denying yourself of a valuable tool in an extreme emergency situation, when your first-aid-kit can not solve the life or death situation. When minutes or hours count. An old and time tested piece of equipment still used to this day is a signal mirror. SOS(... _ _ _ ...) flashes(work's great with a flashlight at night too), they doesn't have to be perfect, keep flashing even if it's wrong. Plus a flashing mirror is very bright and will pin point your location to search and rescue well before they will see you , by about 5 to 10 miles away, easily. PS a flash of a mirror can be seen 180 degrees up or down, left or right of the flash, so it doesn't need to be directly pointed at anything in particular. Just slight movements of the mirror in your hand between your fingers and thumb, in the direction of the sun will do the trick. Practice with the mirror by going out into the street, get about a half a block or closer, face the sun and flash each other.
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Old 1 Week Ago   #47
 
pojoaque, New Mexico
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second this...

really glad to see you posted this, i just read the other comment and wanted to make sure someone said no no to the ice or constricting band idea. i think both ice and constriction band are not used anymore because they tend to concentrate damage to a small area and that can mean loss of limb due to extensive tissue damage. the consensus now is that a rattlesnake bite is vary rarely fatal and won't cause lasting damage but that the various remedies can cause serious, lifelong problems. still sounds like an evacuation is the best bet if you're anywhere you can do that but, if not, keep calm, cool the entire body a bit if possible, and wait it out. certainly easier said than done!



May want to check your source on the ice thing. Constricting band is not recommended as well.



From the website. https://www.snakebitefoundation.org/blog


Good information there on antihistamine use as well.


Ice: Do not use ice for snakebites! Ice causes the smaller blood vessels to constrict and when combined with viper venoms it can produce dramatic tissue damage. Again, better to let the swelling happen and focus on getting to a hospital.[/QUOTE]
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Old 1 Week Ago   #48
 
Carbondale, Colorado
Paddling Since: 2007
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great, informative thread. heard a rattler rattling on a scout of tappan falls 10 years ago...surely left it alone.

this thread also inspired me to purchase an Inreach Mini. used to have a version 1 Spot but the technology has come a long way. it's definitely cheap insurance for a life and death situation.

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Old 1 Week Ago   #49
 
pojoaque, New Mexico
Paddling Since: 1972
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oops, meant "very rarely fatal" not "vary rarely fatal".



Quote:
Originally Posted by semievolved View Post
really glad to see you posted this, i just read the other comment and wanted to make sure someone said no no to the ice or constricting band idea. i think both ice and constriction band are not used anymore because they tend to concentrate damage to a small area and that can mean loss of limb due to extensive tissue damage. the consensus now is that a rattlesnake bite is vary rarely fatal and won't cause lasting damage but that the various remedies can cause serious, lifelong problems. still sounds like an evacuation is the best bet if you're anywhere you can do that but, if not, keep calm, cool the entire body a bit if possible, and wait it out. certainly easier said than done!



May want to check your source on the ice thing. Constricting band is not recommended as well.



From the website. https://www.snakebitefoundation.org/blog


Good information there on antihistamine use as well.


Ice: Do not use ice for snakebites! Ice causes the smaller blood vessels to constrict and when combined with viper venoms it can produce dramatic tissue damage. Again, better to let the swelling happen and focus on getting to a hospital.
[/QUOTE]
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