evacuation litter - Mountain Buzz
 



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Old 3 Days Ago   #1
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
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evacuation litter

Hello friends,
I’ve spent what seems to me to be more than a lot time working on this post/request than what is necessary, but the more I think about it, the more I think this kind of specific request can help a lot more folks than just me. That’s’ what we’re here for, right? Also know that I’ve made a run at searching mtnbuzz to see if this has been brought up before and searched online as well.
I’m looking to check in and get feedback with respect to raft-worthy/compact carry out options that I can add to my rescue first/advanced aid ensemble. Backdrop: a year or so ago we had a situation where we were hiking up a low risk, non-technical approach to the Slickhorn Canyon on the San Juan River. Not too far along, we had a participant trip and fall and it was clear we needed to take the victim (one tough momma – broken tib, fib, 5th meta tarsal on other leg-yikes!) back to the raft. Not especially far, but not optimal either. No problem, right? We had the stuff of most raft trips/groups – or more – would have in this situation: tables, frame decking, straps, able-bodies, meds, etc. (most important– all ended well, she is one tough mo-fo!). We hauled her part of the way on a version of the same ‘backboard’ that many say they would use in a carry-out situation. Along the way, we made re-evaluations of the risks, took into consideration the patient’s comfort level, considered the rescuer’s exposure, etc. Bottom line, she got out ok and is good to go right now.
My desire/the question I have is to learn about litters or other apparatus that I can purchase and include in my rescue equipment should a similar situation arise in the future. What I can say is this is my first go-round at an evac where we put into play an existing table-top as backboard/etc. and if there is something better I can add to my gear that would be compact yet still have a higher level of function, I’d like to get it.
Thus, as a starting point, I have two questions, that no doubt could/may expand into broader discussions:
• What commercially available breakdown litters are available to rafters that would be appropriate fits for private boaters.
• What have others done in situations where they have had to evacuate a real, live person out of the situation where they have been harmed to a place on the river where they are no longer in harm?

thanks in advance all...

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Old 3 Days Ago   #2
 
utah county, Utah
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My first question is: what did you like/ not like about the system that you employed?
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Old 3 Days Ago   #3
 
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C. Springs, Colorado
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This is what cavers use in a rescue situation. It's called a SKED. It is compact and can be used for vertical lifting situations too. A lot of falls require you to isolate the back of the patient from mobility so you combine it with an OSS. (Oregon Spine Splint) Over the years a lot of variations and improvements have been made to the original design, but we still have both in our cave rescue stashes around the state.

https://www.karstsports.com/skedco-s...RoCsB4QAvD_BwE

https://www.karstsports.com/oregon-spine-splint-ii/
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Old 3 Days Ago   #4
 
Golden, Colorado
Join Date: Sep 2005
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Never really thought about it but for compact solutions oars run through a sewn long loop tunnel, canvas sheet deal.Something to do if you know someone good at sewing.Maybe make some kind of bolt on crossbars to maintain width and more tension on the canvas. Custom but probably pretty comfortable and compact.

Oars, camstraps looped around oars for support, sleeping pad, sleeping bag would be another lightweight option, I guess.
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Old 3 Days Ago   #5
 
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lafayette or Grand Lake, Depends on mood, Colorado
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Quote:
Originally Posted by caverdan View Post
This is what cavers use in a rescue situation. It's called a SKED. It is compact and can be used for vertical lifting situations too. A lot of falls require you to isolate the back of the patient from mobility so you combine it with an OSS. (Oregon Spine Splint) Over the years a lot of variations and improvements have been made to the original design, but we still have both in our cave rescue stashes around the state.

https://www.karstsports.com/skedco-s...RoCsB4QAvD_BwE

https://www.karstsports.com/oregon-spine-splint-ii/
I think you answered the question in the thread perfectly. How much training is necessary to become proficient with spine splint. I raft with the same bunch all the time and those might be a perfect group purchase for the major med kit.
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Old 3 Days Ago   #6
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My last two WFR certs they are definitely moving away from hard flat spine boards which can cause problems, and toward the vacuum mat style (google vacuum spine board). You basically take a raft pump and remove the air to create a molded ridged spine immobilization. Most people won't afford to buy or carry one but you could ask for this in your evac request if your patient can't pass a focused spine assessment.
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Old 3 Days Ago   #7
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
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Quote:
Originally Posted by royal View Post
My first question is: what did you like/ not like about the system that you employed?
Good question. The plywood board that we used was a cover over a drop bag and was not mine. My setup has a tall table in that spot which could be used, but not really a very good option. Stability was an issue, the victim certainly did not feel comfortable that they weren't going to roll off. Carrying the board was less than ideal - no hand holds, we used straps, but locations were awkward and contributed to overall stability issues. Of course you can (and we did) make all this work. A couple of folks have pointed to the Sked stretcher which looks like exactly what I had in mind. Thanks.
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Old 3 Days Ago   #8
My name isn't Will
 
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Willamette Valley, Oregon
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It's been a decade ago, but Malloypc wrote about a rescue he was involved with on the Rogue. The text color didn't show up when I just looked, so you might have to highlight the text to see it.


https://www.mountainbuzz.com/forums/...vac-32467.html if the hyperlink doesn't work.



Of note was the utility of the strap holes to help stabilize the patient.


For what it's worth, I've heard from Malloypc about how well the patient ended up recovering beyond all expectation.
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Old 3 Days Ago   #9
 
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Ft jones, United States
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Probably 30 years ago, my Uncle was involved in a bad wreck at Crystal on the Colorado.
Had to be helivacked out.(pre sat-phone, they were able to use signal mirrors to reach planes flying over)
They used oars with a combination of life jackets, and I believe empty dry bags, to make a litter to get him down to the boats and then some distance down stream to a spot suitable for a helicopter to land.

As mentioned above, I'd thing a canvas sling, with maybe some crossbars between two oars would be a good solution.
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Old 3 Days Ago   #10
no tengo
 
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Baytopia, Colorado
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BenSlaughter View Post
They used oars with a combination of life jackets, and I believe empty dry bags, to make a litter to get him down to the boats and then some distance down stream to a spot suitable for a helicopter to land.

As mentioned above, I'd thing a canvas sling, with maybe some crossbars between two oars would be a good solution.
If your patient has a positive MOI for spine and doesn't pass a focused spine assessment then this kind of MacGyver solution could paralyze them.

If they don't have spinal injury and you just want to get them from A to B this might be alright.

Either way I would highly recommend training so you can make these determinations. A 9 day WFR is typically less than $1,000.
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