evacuation litter - Page 2 - Mountain Buzz
 



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Old 1 Week Ago   #11
 
Boise, ID
Paddling Since: '99
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 343
The thing with all these extra devices that you can carry need to be used correctly or they can cause more damage.

I'm with Mania. Take a WFR or another way to get the training is volunteer at a local ski hill with National Ski Patrol. They'll put through OEC which I feel is a pretty good course. Pretty winter sport centric but skills that translate to being outside.

There's a lot of different ways to handle a lot of different injuries and illnesses. All of which when outdoors is immediate care designed to keep someone alive until they can be transitioned to a higher level of care.

With PLBs with SOS functionality, I think the best training would be to help people know when to push the button.

For evac like in the OPs question, you could look at a Kendrick, SKED, a few different quick litters, etc. Really, the best "equipment" you can buy is the training and then think through injuries at home and have a plan to work with what you have on your raft. Some people buy all the rescue gear and then want to use it even if not appropriate for the injury. Saw way too many people try to traction breaks that shouldn't be as an example.

I'm lucky in that I have a good amount of outdoor rescue and aid training and would be one of the more knowledgeable on a lot of trips. But my boating circle has some flight nurses and medics and ER docs. So with diminished responsibilities, I get to party more.

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Old 1 Week Ago   #12
 
Redmond, Oregon
Join Date: Sep 2017
Posts: 7
Or instead of spending $1000 on a SKED just cut holes in the drop bag plywood cover like you would see on a actual backboard. Next search the interwebs for spider straps and wham bam for about $40 you have a backboard with real straps that will hold someone in place, plus a drop bag cover and a table. That’s practical and multifunctional! For a added bonus throw in some loops of webbing that can be attached to the backboard and put over the litter carriers shoulder for added comfort. Most importantly use lots of padding on the patient and never strap over the knees. Being on a backboard will always suck but with some practice and thought you can make it tolerable.
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Old 1 Week Ago   #13
 
Salida, Colorado
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Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 961
Why would anyone buy those items to bring along on a private raft trip?

Accidents happen whether on Class 2 trips like the San Juan or 3 weeks in GC or a hike in the woods or a hut trip or a bike ride, but not near the frequency that warrants bringing that level of rescue equipment. We can and should leave that to the pros who mobilize while we in the field stabilize our own situation.

The OP did their job, which was to get their injured cohort back to camp using improvised plans and techniques based on what they had available. There wasn't elaboration of how she got to the ER, but they got her out with what they had. Even if they only got her back to camp and had to await outside help for extraction they still did their job. If the party is in such poor condition they need a SKED and spinal contraption, higher levels of professional medical/rescue care need to be involved than are on the majority of the trips we are talking about.

In short, no, you do not need to bring litters and spine stabilizers of this level on your private raft trips. Just keep cool heads and use common sense when these rare instances arise.
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Old 1 Week Ago   #14
 
Golden, Colorado
Join Date: Sep 2005
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awesome post, dostep. Couldn’t agree more.

Sometimes a little knowledge from a little course and getting a little certificate ,in the right hands, can save a life.

Sometimes a little knowledge from a little course and getting a little certificate ,in the wrong hands, can turn trips or injuries into an absolute shitshow.
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Old 1 Week Ago   #15
 
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C. Springs, Colorado
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Originally Posted by [email protected] View Post
How much training is necessary to become proficient with spine splint. I raft with the same bunch all the time and those might be a perfect group purchase for the major med kit.
To answer your question. The spine splint itself isn't that hard to figure out to put on a patient. All the straps and buckles are color coded. They have tried to make it as idiot proof as possible. The trick is how to move the patient and support the correct parts of the neck and head while you are attempting to mate it to the patient. I would not want to be the in charge medical person calling the shots. I would try like hell wait until real help arrived and concentrate on making the person as comfortable as possible if your thinking of installing an OSS.

In the outside world you have this option. In a cave, by the time a SKED and OSS reaches a patient, you will have a ton of trained rescue and medical personnel around you working in teams, so installing it is kind of a moot point. In NCRC cave rescue classes show you how to do it and pad the person to make them as comfortable as possible in it. Practicing within your group would be the key to success and that what us cavers do. We as a group in our state try and offer intro to cave rescue classes for new cavers, SAR, and fire depts. on a yearly basis, jumping back and forth from the western slope to the front range.

Back to the OP's problem of finding a compact litter for carrying a person, a SKED would have worked perfectly for getting the patient back to the boats. It does require patient packaging training and lot's of padding and such to make the person as comfortable as possible, knowing how to lift, move, and not injure the person more during transport. Things like laying a line of bodies down over rocky rough terrain and passing the SKED over the top of everybody. Putting a harness on the patient if you have to go vertical along the way. So as others have suggested. Training within your group and getting outside rescue classes under your belt before you need to use a SKED or other extraction device is your key to success. Good luck and don't be afraid to ask a caver to join your trip. They come with a unique bag of tricks.
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Old 1 Week Ago   #16
 
Eagle, Colorado
Paddling Since: 2000
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Rope Litter

If you have a throw bag and standard camping supplies you have a litter. Practice in your family room using something that approximates a human, or use a human. Be careful not to pull a loop through as this can really mess with you. If you need more rope in a loop, carefully saw it down from the top. Hint, use an unequal loop figure eight at the bottom as the start and then the tail can be tied to the other loop to finish it off. If you need it to be semi-rigid, add anything that is stiff under lots of camp pads but make sure their are no pokies...especially i fyou actually have someone with a spinal injury as this can cause Autonomic dysreflexia. As with anything, test it with an uninjured person for comfort and stability first.



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Old 1 Week Ago   #17
 
Portland, Oregon
Paddling Since: 1970
Join Date: Feb 2016
Posts: 123
Evacuation litter, etc.

It's either going to be a bit of river kit that gets redesigned for use in a rescue situation,
or a piece of rescue equipment that gets redesigned for daily use on the river.
The better the design for daily use, the more likely it will be you'll have it with you.
The better the design for rescue work, the more grateful you'll be if yours is the trip that really needs it.

It's kinda like a pistol ... most of us will go our whole lives and never need the thing. Those of us who do, will need it very badly, and will have no time to wait. (Cities ... yuck!)
This being considered, each of us tends to go "naked" and hope someone else has one with the skills to use it if it's ever needed.
It's like CPR, etc. I learned it for you. Please; learn it for me too. Thank you!
Somewhere around here I have a heavy canvas evacuation sling ... a 7' long piece of really heavy canvas with strap handles. I know it worked for me.
Strap handles on a Paco Pad maybe?
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Old 1 Week Ago   #18
 
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C. Springs, Colorado
Join Date: Aug 2004
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Two uses for a SKED
A way for three or four people to collect a bunch of firewood and carry it back to camp.
A way to take the drunk that passed out next to the fire, carry them to their tent and slide them inside for the night. .
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Old 1 Week Ago   #19
 
Summit County, Colorado
Join Date: Feb 2015
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SKED's are handy, but I'm never going to carry one on a river trip. And nobody is strapping one to their backpack for day trips/side hikes anyways.



It's been said many times before, but the best piece of medical equipment you can bring is the right training. Instead of buying a tacticool piece of gear, learn how to use what you have. A couple of oars and some cam straps would make a bomber gurney, especially with a paco pad and maybe a SAM splint if you have C-spine concerns. Much easier than a couple dudes whose only real memories of their 2004 WFR course was the female instructors ass trying to make a gurney out of their throw bag.


Take a course, and refresh your skills every couple of years. A certification card in your wallet is next to useless without the muscle memory that comes from practice.
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Old 1 Week Ago   #20
 
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C. Springs, Colorado
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Quote:
Originally Posted by suburbs View Post
SKED's are handy, but I'm never going to carry one on a river trip. And nobody is strapping one to their backpack for day trips/side hikes anyways.



It's been said many times before, but the best piece of medical equipment you can bring is the right training. Instead of buying a tactical piece of gear, learn how to use what you have. A couple of oars and some cam straps would make a bomber gurney, especially with a paco pad and maybe a SAM splint if you have C-spine concerns. Much easier than a couple dudes whose only real memories of their 2004 WFR course was the female instructors ass trying to make a gurney out of their throw bag.


Take a course, and refresh your skills every couple of years. A certification card in your wallet is next to useless without the muscle memory that comes from practice.
I totally agree. I don't ever see myself dragging a SKED along on a river trip and training is the key to success.

Playing armchair rescuer, lets look at what is in camp to help haul a person who is hurt, back to camp.

If it was a child or small adult, maybe you could put them in a camp chair and two people carry them back in it. Maybe someone has a cot along, how about strapping oars to it to make a litter? Looking over on the beach you see a ducky and a SUP. How about utilizing one of those as a gurney?
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