war on drugs does work - Mountain Buzz
 



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Old 02-10-2009   #1
 
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war on drugs does work

Casper Star-Tribune Online - Casper

i had no idea the rate in casper was up to 26 percent 3 years ago.

all we need now is legalized grass to curb the rest.

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Old 02-10-2009   #2
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Before you credit the war on drugs, you might want to check the drop in the percent of meth defendants against the drop in number of methane drill rigs operating in your area.
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Old 02-10-2009   #3
 
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Mike, the war on drugs is, and always will be, a dismal failure. The more successful law enforcement is, the rarer drugs will be for a short while. Since the demand has not been eliminated, the price will go up and will entice new people to deal or cook up the drugs (meth). Same as the prohibition era. There's just too much easy money to be made.
In the article, they credit drug testing as a solution. I worked for a company that did that for a while, and I found it insulting and invasive. I do not do any drugs and that policy pissed me off. Get a cut, piss in a cup. Someone hits your work truck, more pissing. It was all about insurance dollars. It is not only those with something to hide who should be opposed to random testing. Would you let them randomly search your house? Probably not. If someone wants to do some drug on their own time, I feel that is their choice. Unfortunately, most drug tests do not test for intoxication levels at the time like a BAC test. Thats why you can get fired four days after smoking. Not really fair and pretty presumptious. I know some awesome workers who smoke at home and some completely worthless people who do nothing, including alcohol.
As for Meth, coke, and other harder drugs, I feel most users are pretty useless and untrustworthy, but I'd rather they be fired for their value as an employee, as opposed to what micro levels of a drug in their system. Just like the Patriot act, these intrusive practices really do not make me feel safer. I kind of like my rights, especially probable cause when it comes to privacy. My $.02
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Old 02-10-2009   #4
 
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Most oilpatch workers start using meth because the drilling companies put them on horrible shifts, like 18 hrs. back-to-back. Then they do some up to drive home without crashing, and then somebody wants to party.

Funny how meth plagues the drilling-boom towns: Casper, Gillette, Wamsutter, Rock Springs. I think of it as an industrial disease, like black-lung.

While the cowboys smoke a lot of ganja.
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Old 02-11-2009   #5
 
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The article you linked to contradicts the title of this thread. The "War on Drugs" is a combination of domestic law enforcement and import interdiction. The article says that the successes in Casper were due to a combination of law enforcement and treatment, not just law enforcement.

Quote:
Drug arrests in Casper, meanwhile, have declined by 16.5 percent in the past three years.

During his address, Pagel thanked local foundations that helped fund the effort and lauded local businesses for drug testing their employees. More than 300 businesses now require random drug tests, he said.

"We would not be having the success today if the business community hadn't stepped up and pushed the random drug testing as hard as they have," he said.

Thanks to the effort, Casper is now in a better position to deal with new substance abuse issues, said Bill McDowell, who sits on the Wyoming Meth Project board.

"We are well prepared to identify this crisis, whatever it may be, and with the treatment facilities we have at Central Wyoming Counseling Center, we are prepared to address it," he said.

Mike Burnett, a former police officer and coordinator for the Casper Area Meth Initiative, said he's noticed a change in how the meth problem is approached.

For many years, he saw the burden fall squarely on the shoulders of law enforcement. Now, he's observed a cooperative approach that also involves businesses, the therapeutic community, government and community groups.

"We are hitting this as a collective front instead of just laying all the responsibility on one component," he said.
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Old 02-11-2009   #6
 
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droboat, the rigs dropped but the people are still here nobody is buying their houses. come to casper and check it out.


exactly. a war on drugs doesn't have to be faught one way you are still battling it no matter which option you choose. simpling saying war on drugs doesn't imply arrest only does it? didn't think so.

legalization isn't the answer which is all im getting at. look a the drop in percentage in wyoming. peole weren't moving away during the 3 years of oil boom ,the rate should have been climbing if you think about it.

zgethro do you really want a meth addict working with you?
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Old 02-11-2009   #7
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by caspermike View Post
zgethro do you really want a meth addict working with you?
[/quote]
As for Meth, coke, and other harder drugs, I feel most users are pretty useless and untrustworthy, but I'd rather they be fired for their value as an employee, as opposed to what micro levels of a drug in their system.
[/quote]

They suck to work with, and I should know - I used to be one...10 years ago in a life long gone, in Kansas before I knew anything of kayaking. Legalization is not an option for Meth, in fact rehabilitation doesn't usually work either, unless the addict has an incredibly strong work initiative and truely wants to change their life. It is an unfortunate cycle of self destruction that seems to plague small mid-western towns. Luckily with the crackdowns on the sale of psuedoephedrine that have been mandated we have seen a national drop in it's use. I have lost many good friends to this evil parasite - HERE'S TO A BETTER LIFE FULL OF KAYAKING AND SKIING!
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Old 02-11-2009   #8
 
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i agree 100 percent. the reason i fired some of the people that some through here is because of lack of responsiblity. they would just get up and leave show up 2 hours later and act like they never left. bull shit. i even had one dude who snuck up stairs in our warehouse to sleep, young coke head.
im not saying my internet time is justified but i am one multi tasking mofo who is usually going through papers as i read and type post, hence the really shitty grammar.
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Old 02-11-2009   #9
 
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Mike, I do not want to work with meth or coke heads. I think I expressed my opinion of them. If there is probable cause to think someone is impaired, I have no problem with testing. I am not a fan of random testing, and accidents do happen to unimpaired people. Not every accident warrants a drug testing. Police make this distinction every day. Not every person pulled over or in an accident is tested.
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Old 02-11-2009   #10
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"the rigs dropped but the people are still here nobody is buying their houses"

I doubt that the bulk of the meth defendants referenced in the article are homeowners looking to sell. I'd guess that the mancamps are where the meth abuse runs most rampant.

Look at the working conditions in the gas patch and you might be looking at the cause of the problem. A war on those responsible for the working conditions might be a better alternative to the war on those using meth as a response to the daily drubbing they endure.

Stealing back your work time to ponder such things is a good first step, Comrade CM.
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