Mortgage Crisis and McCain - Mountain Buzz
 



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Old 08-19-2008   #1
 
Golden, Colorado
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Mortgage Crisis and McCain

Interesting video about the "mortgage crisis", AKA the "America is getting filled up with stupid people" crisis.



Evidently, the video is intended to get you mad at McCain for being successful and being worth millions and for not advocating the use of your tax dollars to bail out stupid people and corporations. Odd, but it didn't have the intended effect on me. Despite the persuasive tear-jerking video, I still don't feel inclined to vote for the savior Obama, propogator of the nanny state. I must be an unfeeling robot.

Maybe it's a bit harsh calling people stupid for getting zero down adjustable rate mortgages they can barely afford when 30 year mortgages are at historic lows and interest rates have nowhere to go but up. But I looked "stupid" up on dictionary.com and that was one of the definitions.

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Old 08-19-2008   #2
 
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mccain's not worth millions. his wife is.
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Old 08-19-2008   #3
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If you want to read some interesting points about Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac (which I seem to always confuse with Bernie Mac, RIP), read this:

Quote:
Government Policy Rewards CEO Lying, So We Get More of It: Increasingly Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac are looking like little more than devices to transfer money from the pockets of taxpayers to the pockets of Fannie and Freddie senior executives. Former Fannie Mae boss Franklin Raines paid himself about $50 million for years in which, we now know, the company lied about its earnings in order to inflate executive bonuses, while management was playing fast and loose with other people's money. Beginning in 2007, Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac went off the cliff, their stocks plummeting to less than 20 percent of their previous values, and taxpayers were put on the hook as guarantors of the firms' bad management decisions. The Congressional Budget Office estimates the Mae-Mac debacle will cost taxpayers $100 billion or more. Yet Freddie Mac CEO Richard Syron was paid $14.5 million for 2007, including a $2.2 million "performance bonus." Syron has taken home $38 million total from Freddie in the past five years. Fannie Mae CEO Daniel Mudd got $14.2 million for 2007, plus a substantial prepaid life insurance policy and other perks including "financial counseling, an executive health program and dining services," the Washington Post reported. Hey, $49,000-a-year median U.S. households, you are being taxed for millionaire Mudd's "dining services." Bon appetite.



[+] Enlarge

AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta
The headquarters of a racketeering group engaged in organized crime.


Executives receiving very high pay justify their deals on two grounds: that they are risk-takers in high-pressure situations, and that they have valuable expertise. Now we know that no one at the top of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac took any personal risks -- everything was federally guaranteed, and all mistakes billed to the taxpayer. Here, the New York Times reports that Syron was repeatedly warned in 2004 that the organization was taking on bad loans, and did nothing. Syron justified his inaction by complaining to the Times that he was under pressure from various Fannie constituents. That's why he was paid so much, to take the heat! Yet he took no heat, rather, devoted himself to avoiding responsibility. If things go well, executives are lavished with money and praised as risk-takers. If things go poorly, executives are lavished with money and blame others.



And just what incredible expertise do Syron and Mudd possess? They made billion-dollar blunder after billion-dollar blunder; they failed to realize things as basic as buyers borrowing without documentation of income may not be able to repay loans. People chosen at random from the phone book could hardly have performed worse. Yet the federal bail-out legislation just signed by George W. Bush does not require them to give back any of their ill-gotten gains.


This is the core lesson of CEO overpay scandals: The corrupt or incompetent executive always keeps the money. He may be caught and embarrassed by bad press, but he keeps the money while someone else -- shareholders, taxpayers, workers -- is punished. Raines recently settled a federal legal complaint by agreeing to return about $3 million of his $50 million, but kept the rest; his employment contract was worded such that even if he was malfeasant, whatever he took from company coffers was his. Hilariously, federal prosecutors claimed victory because Raines "surrendered" to the government a large block of stock options -- options now worthless, owing to the Fannie Mae decline Raines helped set in motion by lying about Fannie numbers. Until Congress enacts a law that allows money taken by corrupt or incompetent executives to be recovered, the lying will continue. Lying by CEOs is what society rewards!


Why does Congress tolerate the swindle aspect of Fannie and Freddie? For the standard reason: Congress is on the take. Here, Lisa Lerer of Politico reports that in the past decade, Fannie and Freddie spent almost $200 million on campaign donations to Congress and on lobbying members of Congress, some of the lobbying money going to former members. This year, for instance, Fannie gave the legal max of $10,000 to Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi and to Republican House Whip Roy Blunt, neither of whom face meaningful re-election challenge. As for costly lobbying, the implied deal is: Don't rock the boat while in office and someday you too will be a former member getting easy money to lobby former colleagues. During Senate debate on the Mae-Mac bailout, Majority Leader Harry Reid refused to permit a vote on an amendment that would have barred Fannie and Freddie from giving money to members of Congress. Reid did not merely oppose the measure, he refused to allow the Senate to vote on it -- so that members of Congress could remain on the take, without having to go on record about the matter.


Now that taxpayers are covering Fannie and Freddie's cooked books, the $200 million diverted to Congress in effect came from average Americans, forcibly removed from their pockets -- and thanks to Senator Reid, more will be forcibly taken from your pocket and placed into the accounts of senators and representatives. This is what TMQ calls a Sliver Strategy. The Sliver Strategy is a means to disguise embezzlement. Congress looked the other way while Fannie and Freddie approved vast amounts of bad debt, in order to shave off a sliver for itself -- in this case, the $200 million in lobbying and donations. Had Congress simply awarded itself $200 million, editorialists would have been outraged. Because the money was slipped in to a larger fiasco of much greater sums wasted, Congress got away with it.
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Old 08-19-2008   #4
 
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good job on posting this. McCain is Right on. The Federal Government can't keep bailing everyone and everything out.

i think we should pull back on foreign aid also.

Get our own house in order before we try to fix others.

Free Trade isn't free. It is costing us jobs. The Hershey plant that was in Sacramento...is now in Mexico....My dodge truck is made in Mexico.
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Old 08-20-2008   #5
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by heliodorus04 View Post
If you want to read some interesting points about Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac (which I seem to always confuse with Bernie Mac, RIP), read this:
Absolutely sickening. How did we end up with a system where profits are privatized but risk is socialized?

And worse still is that the "solution" will be to have even more government involvement.
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Old 08-21-2008   #6
 
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McCain knows all about public bailouts following a banking crises. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Keating_Five
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Old 08-21-2008   #7
 
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Quote:
The general co-chairman of John McCain’s presidential campaign, former Sen. Phil Gramm (R-Texas), led the charge in 1999 to repeal a Depression-era banking regulation law that Democrat Barack Obama claimed on Thursday contributed significantly to today’s economic turmoil.

“A regulatory structure set up for banks in the 1930s needed to change because the nature of business had changed,” the Illinois senator running for president said in a New York economic speech. “But by the time [it] was repealed in 1999, the $300 million lobbying effort that drove deregulation was more about facilitating mergers than creating an efficient regulatory framework.”
-Politico

Find the rest here,
http://www.politico.com/news/stories/0308/9246.html

Yes, lots of stupid people, the majority actually (more on this later). But it seems to me that laws were changed to take advantage of their stupidity. Huge profits were made by brokers, lobbyists, executives, etc. Banks failed and then get bailed out by taxpayers (the majority of them the same stupids). So isn't the money all going the same direction? Seems like a well exectuted business plan to me.

Stupidity: So the same people who orchestrated this are the same ones who cut education funding (no new taxes), or keep the same property tax based funding (keep the dumb ones dumb), or promote vouchers (subsidy for the rich already sending their kids to private schools). Think of where we would be in 30-60 years from now if we had spent all the Iraq money on education.

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Old 08-21-2008   #8
 
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I love this quote. I hate the reality it describes. Dick Cheney, take note.

"Fascism should more properly be called corporatism because it is the merger of state and corporate power." - Benito Mussolini

Quote:
Originally Posted by blutzski View Post
Absolutely sickening. How did we end up with a system where profits are privatized but risk is socialized?

And worse still is that the "solution" will be to have even more government involvement.
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Old 08-21-2008   #9
 
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the only thing worse

is if profits are socialized and risk is socialized.
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Old 08-21-2008   #10
 
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Quote:
"Fascism should more properly be called corporatism because it is the merger of state and corporate power." - Benito Mussolini
I read somewhere that the definition in Merriam-Webster was changed to remove the reference to corporations some time after WWII.

Quote:
And worse still is that the "solution" will be to have even more government involvement.
But remember Bruno that the Bush administration is trying it's hardest to reinforce your feelings about the government by proving its ineffectiveness and ineptitupe.
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Why elect someone who didn't think his job was worthwhile?
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