How much cheaper is it to make something galvanized, than stainless? - Mountain Buzz
 

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Old 01-12-2015   #1
 
InflatableSteve's Avatar
 
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How much cheaper is it to make something galvanized, than stainless?

I am just curios about this. When we were building our trailer, we decides to use carriage bolts on the bottom there wouldn't be any sharp edges to rub against our inflatables. The thing is that none of the local hardware stores had the right size carriage bolts in stainless. Some of them didn't have any in stainless. But they all had a wide selection of galvanized bolts. I also see that the NRS campsite table that I just ordered is also galvanized.

Is it really that much cheaper? You would think there would be just as much demand for the stainless, but I am a quality over quantity kind of guy.

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Old 01-12-2015   #2
 
Flagstaff, Arizona
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I can't answer your question, but if I ever need something that the hardware stores don't carry, I give these guys a call and stop by. They are in town for me so not out of the way. I'm not too sure of that jungle down there though.
https://www.copperstate.com/contact-...ate-locations/
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Old 01-16-2015   #3
 
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Galvanized is a coating so its much cheaper. Stainless is a steel alloy with a minimum of 10.5% chromium content so its much more expensive to make. Google search is your friend.
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Old 01-17-2015   #4
 
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Stainless is not worth the money for a trailer, you will be find with a galvanized bolt. Stainless is kind of strange metal for fateners it is actually softer that the steel they use in a galvanized bolt. I have used them a lot in construction due only to corrosion issues with the chemicals they now use to treat lumber for outdoor use. We would strip SS screws all the time.

The only caveat to the statement above is if you are in a marine environment.

Just go with galvi, it will last for ever and you will not have a problem.
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Old 01-18-2015   #5
 
aurora, Colorado
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Stainless is also much weaker than even a grade v bolt. If you were planning on just replacing with stainless, you may be askin for failure.
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Old 03-18-2015   #6
 
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Stainless under tension in a wet/salty environment can also fail from stress corrosion cracking. Don't use on a trailer where important (suspension/axle) things need to stay put.
-d
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Old 03-19-2015   #7
 
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Guys, one: this thread is really old and two: You really need to read the original post. He's talking about bolting decking down to a fucking trailer not attaching his axels or hitch. AND the question really is about the process of galvanizing something. and why are galvi products more prominent than SS. I can't answer the question specifically with numbers but in principle making something out of stainless steel is much more expensive as the raw material is more expensive AND galvanization is a thin coating on top of much cheaper grades of steel... The basic principle is that it's much cheaper to galvi something than to produce it out of stainless.... hence COST is the main reason there are so many low grade galvi products vs stainless.

Strength is also an issue in many cases and structurally I generally agree; for strength go zinc or galvi. I built ski lifts for years: important steel parts wear galvanized, nearly all fasteners were zinc plated. The rare few that were galvi were ground contact parts. Moral of the story, why even go galvi? Zinc is just fine.

If I were replacing a trailer deck, which I just did, and I were to use carriage bolts, which I didn't, and I had the money for SS, that's what I would use. Why, the galvi will wear off the top of the carriage bolt eventually, and it will start rusting, staining the wood and looking like shit.

Now, when I did my trailer I used self taping trailer deck screws, specifically made for the task. They are epoxy coated, self taping and self reaming. Work great, cheap and easy.
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Old 03-19-2015   #8
 
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elkhaven,

Language please! There are children here, like yourself.

Now, if I knew that my reply would have made you so angry, I would have been much more verbose and wandered off topic. Seriously though, thank you for being the angry police man here in the eddy. Also, if you are going to be so needlessly offensive, you should at least be right in your response.

Now to correct your misinformation for the rest of us.

You wrote, "Moral of the story, why even go galvi? Zinc is just fine."

OK, Zinc plating and galvanized are both zinc. Zinc plating is very thin. "Galvi" is 10-20 times thicker. Zinc plated is good for indoor use where the shiny appearance matters. Hot dipped galvanized is what you want for outdoor use. Zinc plating will wear off much quicker than galvanized.

I guess your interpretation of, "use carriage bolts on the bottom there wouldn't be any sharp edges to rub against our inflatables" differs from mine. Perhaps you can read the OP's mind? Cool.

You wrote, "AND the question really is about the process of galvanizing something". Really? Perhaps you should read the post. His ONLY question was, "Is it really that much cheaper?" He then states that he is a quality minded individual, hence, my reply for what materials should be used where to ensure the quality he would like.

As for the timeliness of my response: I don't visit often. As a mechanical engineer with 20+ years experience who is running his own company now, I can't spend the time I used to when I worked for corporate America designing stainless steel ultra-high vacuum equipment for the semiconductor industry, or designing blow molding equipment for Ball Corporation. I don't know what I'm talking about obviously.

Try decaf.

-d
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Old 03-19-2015   #9
 
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Livingston, lifesaver, oh sage of the engineering world,

No anger what so ever. Just one of my favorite sayings. Childish? Sure, if you say so.

I stand by my conclusion (moral) - why hot dipped galvinized then, why not zinc plated? I know you state it is useful indoors where shiny appearance matters, but many, many industries use plated hardware in exposed outdoor applications. So, my point still stands. Why even galvi?

He didn't ask about strength, his stated use requires minimal strength. It wouldn't matter if it were low grade bolts, ss or grade 8. It's a trailer deck, not the space shuttle, Stainless Steel "ultra high" pressure, or vacuum vessel or a mold for blowing widgets for "really important" company.

Why respond? I simply noted the 3rd response in a row that didn't address the original post or even approach discussing how much cheaper it is nor a comparison of the relative demand. In my opinion it was useless boasting. I chose to respond and offer my opinions, which for the discussion at hand are perfectly valid. Yes I overlooked relating they're both zinc, however even thought they're based on the same element, they're a vastly different product so I simply discussed they're end uses. Plated hardware can and does survive just fine in many exterior environments, is more user friendly and less expensive than hot dipped galvanization aka "galvi". Therefore I, just I, obviously not you, suggest that zinc plated hardware is just fine bolting down a trailer deck.

Relax on the language, it's the internet. It's where kids go to learn about such things.
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Old 03-19-2015   #10
 
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Quote:
He didn't ask about strength, his stated use requires minimal strength
elkhaven, where in his post did you read that? It seems we are reading and replying to two different threads here. He only stated "bottom". Thought I'd be helpful, sorry about that.

Quote:
many, many industries use plated hardware in exposed outdoor applications
Probably. So? Depends on the application if it is the right answer. You are stating absolutes (plating > galv) about which I will have to disagree.

Quote:
Plated hardware can and does survive just fine in many exterior environments, is more user friendly and less expensive than hot dipped galvanization aka "galvi". Therefore I, just I, obviously not you, suggest that zinc plated hardware is just fine bolting down a trailer deck.
Not sure what user friendly means, as for the rest- Here is a cut/past from McMaster Carr on a 3/8-16 carriage bolt:

Zinc-Plated Steel—Offer good corrosion resistance. Medium-strength steel (Grade 5) meets SAE J429. Low-strength steel (Grade 2) meets ASTM A307 or SAE J429.

Hot-Dipped Galvanized Steel—These low-strength (Grade 2) steel bolts are more corrosion resistant than zinc-plated steel bolts. They meet ASTM A307; galvanization meets ASTM 153. Bolts must be used with hot-dipped galvanized nuts.


Cost for these in a 4" length:
SS 18-8: $1.47 ea
Zinc Plated: $.63 ea
Galv: $.35 ea

Yeah, why galvi? Uh, how about cost and corrosion resistance? Stick with you argument though, I think I'm coming around.

No anger? Well sorry if I interpreted your "f---ing trailer" and pointing out my tardiness as anything but love. Ignorance and attitude is a wonderful combo. Drop the attitude and the ignorance is usually forgiven and often helped by others.

-d
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