Self-Support Kayak Dry Bags...suggestions - Mountain Buzz
 



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Old 05-13-2016   #1
 
Eden, Utah
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Self-Support Kayak Dry Bags...suggestions

any brands, types of self support dry bags anyone recommend?

I'm thinking about a couple of these:

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B003U7TBU0/...463184845&sr=1

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Old 05-13-2016   #2
 
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Roaring Fork Valley, Colorado
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I'd be apt to tell you the ONLY option is Watershed brand similar models, simply based on their supreme durability, quality, and track record. Sea to Summit might be my second choice if i was trying to save some $$$ but not really sure there's that significant of a price difference anyways.
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Old 05-13-2016   #3
 
Bellingham, Washington
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Try Kayak Academy's bags

18 years ago, I bought five 10 liter polyurethane coated nylon dry bags from Seal Line. I have used these bags for sea kayak trips hundreds and hundreds of days and they are still going strong. In fact, I just used three of the 10 liter clothes bags for 52 more days in the front of my Katana 10.4 crossover kayak on six different multi-day river trips in the SW. They were wet all day, every day, and yet my clothes were perfectly dry. In short, they are great bags that last forever... which is why Seal Line quit making them, I suppose.

However, a Seattle sea kayak shop started making their own bags with the same materials because I am not the only one who found these dry bags to be superior to anything else on the market. Here's the link: https://kayakacademy.com/collections/dry-bags

Great value and cheaper than the bag you linked to on Amazon (which, ironically, is made by Seal Line.) I'm okay with Watershed bags for raft support trips, but I would never take one on a kayak self-support trip because they don't compress down to fit into tight spaces as well as a nylon polyurethane roll top bag. The zipper is too thick and the shape is wrong. Not to mention they fact that they are more expensive.

Anyhow, that 's my two on the subject. Apologies to those who are offended by strong opinions.
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Old 05-14-2016   #4
 
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Buena Vista, Colorado
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I use 4 different types of bags. I have a Watershed Chattooga and 2 Watershed stow-floats. I use the Chattooga for camera equipment and expensive electronics. Then I use 6 and 10 liter NRS tuff sacks for most other items and one 38 liter for my tent and bag. I also have a handful of the thin Sea to Summit bags that work well for toiletries, first aid gear and other odds and ends. MSR Dromedary bags are the way to go for carrying water, and I personally use the PVC tube groover system, but a small Ecosafe can work equally well if you can figure a good spot to carry it.
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Old 05-14-2016   #5
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
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Quote:
Originally Posted by landslide View Post
18 years ago, I bought five 10 liter polyurethane coated nylon dry bags from Seal Line. I have used these bags for sea kayak trips hundreds and hundreds of days and they are still going strong. In fact, I just used three of the 10 liter clothes bags for 52 more days in the front of my Katana 10.4 crossover kayak on six different multi-day river trips in the SW. They were wet all day, every day, and yet my clothes were perfectly dry. In short, they are great bags that last forever... which is why Seal Line quit making them, I suppose.



However, a Seattle sea kayak shop started making their own bags with the same materials because I am not the only one who found these dry bags to be superior to anything else on the market. Here's the link: https://kayakacademy.com/collections/dry-bags



Great value and cheaper than the bag you linked to on Amazon (which, ironically, is made by Seal Line.) I'm okay with Watershed bags for raft support trips, but I would never take one on a kayak self-support trip because they don't compress down to fit into tight spaces as well as a nylon polyurethane roll top bag. The zipper is too thick and the shape is wrong. Not to mention they fact that they are more expensive.



Anyhow, that 's my two on the subject. Apologies to those who are offended by strong opinions.

Those 'dry bags' might cut it for sea kayaking but all my gear goes in a watershed bag that I care about. There is a difference between being wet in flatwater and water forced in by the river. After all this is a whitewater web site
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Old 05-14-2016   #6
 
Bellingham, Washington
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Yeah, the GC does have a lot of flatwater, I'll grant you that. Westwater, too. And yet these 18 year old dry bags didn't leak. But go ahead, keep making assumptions. You're doing great.
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Old 05-14-2016   #7
Tim Kennedy
 
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Avon, Colorado
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That dry bag would work fine. If I was packing clothes or sleeping bag in it, I would wrap that stuff in a thick contractor/compactor garbage bag first for extra "security". A mix of different types would work best. For items that must stay dry such as clothing, sleeping bag, and electronics, I would say that a Watershed dry bag is the best option. But, for other items that don't need to stay 100% dry, such as packaged food, stove and cook kits, etc., I would use a lighter, slimmer roll top bag like the Seal Line or Sea to Summit. On a Grand trip this past Feb. in a long boat, I used Watersheds (San Juan, Chattooga) in the bow for my tent, clothes, and sleeping stuff. That worked great. Stuff stayed dry, no worries. I also used two Chattooga bags behind my seat for food. I found these to be difficult to slide in and out of the boat when fully packed, due to all the buckles and straps on the Watershed bags, and the stiffness of the material. Next time, I will use nylon roll top bags like the Seal Line Baja or Sea to Summit Big River (20-30 liters) for my food and other items packed in the stern. These bags would be durable enough to take the abuse of a multi day whitewater trip, and be easier to pack into a fully loaded boat. If I was doing a shorter trip in a river runner/creek boat, then I would probably use Watershed Futa stow floats in the stern for stuff that must stay dry and the lighter bags right behind the seat for food. A small Watershed (Ocoee) is great for a lunch/day access bag that you can keep behind your backhand or under/between your legs. I put my camera, lunch, first aid kit, river map, etc. in one of these.

*I don't recommend the NRS Dri-Stow see through vinyl bags for winter trips. The material cracked and split in the cold temps before we even got to the river...useless.
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Old 05-14-2016   #8
 
Bellingham, Washington
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I've found that roll top Sea to Summit bags don't last very long before they start leaking. I tried putting my First Aid kit in one (which is always stored behind my seat in my WW boats) and I got tired of having to throw out soggy bandages. (This is off-topic, but I now use a Nalgene bottle with a biner duct taped to it to hold my 1st aid kit and it works bomber!)

I have an Ocoee Watershed bag, but I'd never use it on a multi-day kayak self support trip because you can't really burp them all the way. With a roll top PU-coated nylon bag you can put a knee on it and burp it all the way flat and get it rolled back up without any air leaking back in. I can never do as well burping air out of a Watershed bag because air leaks back in while I'm messing with the ziplock. Also, the nylon outer coating of the bags I linked to make them very slippery against plastic hulls. They just slide into the bow of my Katana and then get held in place by the foot rest.

As for camera gear, I would NEVER store my camera gear in anything other than a Pelican Case or other hard-sided, gasket sealed case. Those cases come in all sizes now and it's very easy to modify the foam liner when you buy a new camera or lens.

Finally, for those who have never landed a fully loaded sea kayak in 4 meter swells... well, come on out to the Wet Coast and give it a try sometime. After you're done puking up sea water and bits of sea weed you might have a different opinion about all that "flatwater" sea kayakers paddle and the gear we use to paddle it.

I just bought my Katana 10.4 last fall and have already spent 54 days in it on multi-day trips (GC, San Juan, Ruby-Horsethief-Westwater, Lower Owyhee, Grand Ronde, as well as day trips on local PNW rivers.) As someone who enjoys WW, sea kayaking, and backpacking, I LOVE doing multi-day river trips in these new crossover boats. It combines skills & techniques I've learned in different sports and opens up a whole new world of possibilities.
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Old 05-14-2016   #9
 
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Boulder, Colorado
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I have't bought one in a while, but have always been damp at best in the cheap light sea to summit type stuff. Not sure if its the roll top without the stiffer backer, or if they get pin holes too quickly.

On that kayak Academy link, which bags were you trying suggest?

I like the idea of vented bags, with a burp valve. Do you use that one?

The little HD zip locks look good; anyone using these?

Landslide, sounds like you are getting out on a ton of cool trips; I am jealous.

I just Picked up the Jackson Kayak Karma Traverse 10 and am stoked to put some miles on it. It is so much more comfortable than the lower decked long boats I've been paddling for this type of trip.

Landing a boat in four meter swells sounds challenging. Especially the puking part.
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Old 05-14-2016   #10
 
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Buena Vista, Colorado
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I really think more smaller bags are preferable to a couple big ones. The 6 liter NRS tuff sacks are great for meals. I like to have one bag dedicated to breakfast, one for lunch and one for dinner as well as one for stove and fuel. Utensils and measuring cup can go in the Sea to Summit little tiny bags. More small bags make it simple to utilize your available space to it's maximum potential.
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