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Old 04-05-2013   #61
 
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portland, Oregon
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Who needs smaller pockets?


The Home Depot clear storage organizers have adjustable tabs inside you can accomplish the same sort of thing, and see the contents

Old Costco mango salsa containers are relatively cubical, and have a screw lid. Perfect for keeping similar things in similar places. I'm sure there is no shortage of things that go into curbside that should work in a drybox

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Old 04-05-2013   #62
 
Redmond, Oregon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MT4Runner View Post
Fair point.

Going back to the "Trading beer for wood cutting" would be the easiest/safest/cheapest solution!
Let's clarify that.

Wood cutting first.
Then give the cutter the agreed amount of beer.

========

I've got an adjustable dado and an old radial arm and don't need any more beer than what I have.
This will justify my keeping the radial arm after the chop saw purchase.

========

Next mission. Start saving the Mango containers.
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Old 04-06-2013   #63
 
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Yes I think I'll figure something out with a person w skills and tools. I was recently reminded that I am not a woodwoorker. I was going to router in some tie downs onto our trailer decking. Fortunately I practices on scrap wood, I so bad at it I'm glad I didn't touch the trailer!
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Old 04-06-2013   #64
 
Redmond, Oregon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lhowemt View Post
Yes I think I'll figure something out with a person w skills and tools. I was recently reminded that I am not a woodwoorker. I was going to router in some tie downs onto our trailer decking. Fortunately I practices on scrap wood, I so bad at it I'm glad I didn't touch the trailer!
Routers go where they want to.
Set up a jig or boards the are temp screwed in to have skill.
You don't see the pros on the woodworking shows do much free handing unless it is on an edge.
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Old 04-06-2013   #65
 
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I may just hire it out. It also was not friendly to my hands, i have some arthritis. Or I may do it. We have eye bolts under the boat decking which works for the motorcycle. I can run straps under the boards in lieu of tie downs for dryboxes and coolers. Simpler
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Old 02-28-2014   #66
 
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I am getting ready to build these pegboard dividers for my drybox, and I am going to try to DIY it. I am moderately skilled in woodworking, and have a nice chopsaw, circular saw, and a sweet new dremel saw I got for Xmas. Which of these tools would you guys recommend for cutting the slots for the pegboard? I'm pretty sure the chopsaw is worthless. I could set the skillsaw at the proper depth, but it is a big heavy worm drive thing so it might be difficult. I suppose I could just screw the board (extra length) onto the workbench to hold it steady while I make cuts. I'm pretty good at shaving thin slices off. Which would be better, the circular saw or dremel saw? I have yet to use the dremel, so I'm kind of looking for a project for it.

Does anyone have recommendations on depth of wood to shave vs leave, I guess the leave is the most important so it doesn't break under stress of jostling.

Time to go to home resources and find some used peg board. Except it is a full on Blizzard here, so not today.
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Old 02-28-2014   #67
 
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Colorado Springs, Colorado
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Quote:
Originally Posted by codycleve View Post
Is it bad that this is my real furniture... dry box coffee table and rocket box end tables... if I got an aire couch it would be more complete... I got tired of packing the dry box up and down the stairs from the basement..

Attachment 5896
Many years ago, when my wife and I were newly married and just getting started, I bought us a new coffee table - a Perception Dancer kayak which sat in our apartment for a few years until it was banished to the storage room.

Good memories.
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Old 02-28-2014   #68
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lhowemt View Post
I am getting ready to build these pegboard dividers for my drybox, and I am going to try to DIY it. I am moderately skilled in woodworking, and have a nice chopsaw, circular saw, and a sweet new dremel saw I got for Xmas. Which of these tools would you guys recommend for cutting the slots for the pegboard? I'm pretty sure the chopsaw is worthless. I could set the skillsaw at the proper depth, but it is a big heavy worm drive thing so it might be difficult. I suppose I could just screw the board (extra length) onto the workbench to hold it steady while I make cuts. I'm pretty good at shaving thin slices off. Which would be better, the circular saw or dremel saw? I have yet to use the dremel, so I'm kind of looking for a project for it. Does anyone have recommendations on depth of wood to shave vs leave, I guess the leave is the most important so it doesn't break under stress of jostling. Time to go to home resources and find some used peg board. Except it is a full on Blizzard here, so not today.
Do you have a router? That or a table saw would be an easy and accurate way to dado your project. You can use a circular saw and set the depth. Clamp a fence to the work piece to get a straight cut. It's just more work...
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Old 02-28-2014   #69
 
Redmond, Oregon
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Use eye protection, think, good lighting, fingers

With the tools you have grab a scrap piece.

Do the clamp a straight edge - possibly a factory edge of plywood - at the location where the blade of the circular saw cuts where you want one edge of the /dado'. Cut that straight.

Now set for the other side of the dado and cut it straight.

These will be mirror image set ups where if the saw wanders it will take out whats gong away anyway.

Then freehand slowly the center till its almost clean.

Take a narrow chisel and clean it.

=======

Heres the concept with top notch jigs



You can do it freehand



etc
- - - - -

Practice

Use any scraps as kindling for your next trip
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Old 02-28-2014   #70
 
Park City, Utah
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lhowemt View Post
I am getting ready to build these pegboard dividers for my drybox, and I am going to try to DIY it. I am moderately skilled in woodworking, and have a nice chopsaw, circular saw, and a sweet new dremel saw I got for Xmas. Which of these tools would you guys recommend for cutting the slots for the pegboard? I'm pretty sure the chopsaw is worthless. I could set the skillsaw at the proper depth, but it is a big heavy worm drive thing so it might be difficult. I suppose I could just screw the board (extra length) onto the workbench to hold it steady while I make cuts. I'm pretty good at shaving thin slices off. Which would be better, the circular saw or dremel saw? I have yet to use the dremel, so I'm kind of looking for a project for it.

Does anyone have recommendations on depth of wood to shave vs leave, I guess the leave is the most important so it doesn't break under stress of jostling.

Time to go to home resources and find some used peg board. Except it is a full on Blizzard here, so not today.
OK, forget the dremel. Of the tools you have, the worm gear is about your only choice. You don't say if you have a table saw, that would be handy too.

Here's what I would do. Take a couple of pieces 3/4'' material (plywood,OSB,#2 pine) approx. 3-4'' wide and reasonably straight. Using your framing or speed square to keep it square, make a T with the 3/4'' boards. On most saws, the distance from the edge of the shoe to the blade is about 1-7/16'' to 1-9/16''. The nice thing about a worm-gear saw is if you're right handed, you can see the blade easier.

So, if you're using 3/4'' material to cut your grooves in, set the saw depth for approx 3/8'' or half the depth of what ever material you're using. Using your handy quikgrip clamp, clamp the T on to the board your cutting the grooves in onto the work bench. Slid the saw on the right side of the T till it cuts the groove. Most 7-1/4'' saw blades will cut a kerf approx. .080-.100'' wide. You need .25-.28 width of groove to slid the peg board in. If you have a table saw, rip a thin strip of wood that will go between the saw shoe and the T to make the grove the desired width, with-out having to un-clamp the T from the board. Make your first pass, then insert the strip between the T and the saw shoe and make the second pass. You may need to clear it out with a chisel, but I'd make two strips of the required width and make 3 passes to get the desired width w/o having to chisel it out.. Clear as mud?

Now for extra credit, if you make the blade of the T the same width as the space between the grooves, you can use that to index your cuts on the board as you move the T down the board to make your cuts. I'd make the boards longer than you need and cut them to length after grooving. Trying to clamp and cut on the end of a board can be a PITA.

Remember, safety first. Make sure your work area is clear and you're not trying to lean over you snowblower or 'sled or cat frame to make your cuts.
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