How much gear can a 1 person IK hold? - Mountain Buzz
 



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Old 03-21-2017   #1
 
Fort Collins, Colorado
Paddling Since: 2013
Join Date: Mar 2017
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How much gear can a 1 person IK hold?

I'm a packrafter looking at getting an inflatable kayak. I do research while I'm on the river (ecology, geomorphology type stuff), so I frequently need to carry a fair amount of equipment with me. I'd also like the possibility to do 2-8 night self-support trips.

I'm looking at getting an AIRE Outfitter I IK. My question is if anyone has any experience packing this boat with a bunch of gear and running whitewater (III-IV). I'm mostly interested in relatively big water trips, but running smaller creeks would be nice too (although I do have my packraft as well).

If anyone has experience with how much gear an Outfitter I can carry, or any similar ~10 ft long IK, please let me know! I don't want to buy a solo IK and just be wishing I had a tandem so I can carry enough gear for a week for myself.

Also, to give more context, I am comfortable packing very light (e.g., for a slightly longer self-support trip). I'm mostly worried about volume and how the weight might be distributed along the boat if I carry a bunch of stuff (i.e., packing it too high and it raising my center of gravity).

Thanks!

Dan

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Old 03-21-2017   #2
 
Colorado, Colorado
Join Date: Mar 2014
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If you are a packrafter, do you happen to have the cargo fly installed on your packraft? If so, what gear do you need to take with you that will not fit in your cargo fly and internal dry bags? If you do not have a cargo fly, why not have Alpacka retro your packraft with it instead of buying a 1 person IK. I am positive you can put as much gear into the cargo fly and internal dry bags just the same as you could load all that gear into a 1 person IK.
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Old 03-21-2017   #3
 
Aurora, Colorado
Paddling Since: 2000
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I've used an NRS 1 seater IK (Bandit maybe?) on multiday trips. I was with at least 1 other person, so some group gear got to be split up. I did fine on Yampa for 6 days with it. Also I think 4 days on Gunny Gorge. Just depends how long and how light you're really willing to go.
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Old 03-21-2017   #4
 
SLC, Utah
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Doesn't directly answer your question, but I have done a number of self-support trips with a 1 person Pack Cat and found that a 70 or 80 lb load is manageable but becomes a handful when a lot of maneuvering is required, i.e. low water MFS, Escalante, etc. 50 or 60 lbs is much better in those conditions. So it depends a lot on where you plan to go. 100 lbs in the Pack Cat in the San Juan would probably be ok.
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Old 03-21-2017   #5
Shapp
 
the grove, Oregon
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Old 03-21-2017   #6
Shapp
 
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Old 03-21-2017   #7
 
Fort Collins, Colorado
Paddling Since: 2013
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Thanks for the great info, folks!

AZPackrafter: I have a prototype Kokopelli that I've modified to be self-bailing. I'm looking for a bit larger craft that's going to be more stable for my research trips. It's not that I don't enjoy swimming every once in a while, but when I have work to do, I like the comforts of a duckie.

climbdenauli and Paulster: great to know. That gives me a lot of confidence in going with a solo.

shappattack: Awesome! Pictures like that are exactly what I'm looking for. That helps a lot!

I think I'm going to go with the Outfitter I. Sounds like I can get by with that kind of length.

Thanks everyone!

Dan
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Old 03-21-2017   #8
 
SLC, Utah
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One other thought - most of those I have paddled with use 2 person IKs for self support to have a little more ability to carry weight and manage shallow water. Maybe that's because I live in Utah where water is generally scarce. I don't see any disadvantage to a slightly larger boat. While my experience has been generally successful, my wife and I have both moved to slightly bigger boats and I'd advise getting a 2 person boat if it is mainly for self-support trips.
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Old 03-21-2017   #9
Shapp
 
the grove, Oregon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by paulster View Post
One other thought - most of those I have paddled with use 2 person IKs for self support to have a little more ability to carry weight and manage shallow water. Maybe that's because I live in Utah where water is generally scarce. I don't see any disadvantage to a slightly larger boat. While my experience has been generally successful, my wife and I have both moved to slightly bigger boats and I'd advise getting a 2 person boat if it is mainly for self-support trips.
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Old 03-22-2017   #10
 
Fort Collins, Colorado
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Quote:
Originally Posted by paulster View Post
One other thought - most of those I have paddled with use 2 person IKs for self support to have a little more ability to carry weight and manage shallow water. Maybe that's because I live in Utah where water is generally scarce. I don't see any disadvantage to a slightly larger boat. While my experience has been generally successful, my wife and I have both moved to slightly bigger boats and I'd advise getting a 2 person boat if it is mainly for self-support trips.
Interesting. So my understanding (and experience from the limited number of times I've been in an IK) is that a solo IK is much more maneuverable than a tandem. My thought process is generally that I want to maximize maneuverability by getting a boat that's just big enough to schlep around all my gear. I plan to do a lot of paddling around large wood (generally to measure that wood for my research), so I'd like something that I can turn fast and ferry quickly.

What's your experience with how much maneuverability/speed you lose going from a solo to a tandem boat? I suppose a tandem would be a good choice if the maneuverability losses weren't all that bad. I think the trouble is that I've never had the chance to paddle a solo and a tandem within a short enough timespan to really compare how they handle.

Thanks,

Dan
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