Aluminum Dutch Ovens - Mountain Buzz
 



Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 10-06-2010   #1
 
caverdan's Avatar
 
C. Springs, Colorado
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 1,769
Aluminum Dutch Ovens

I just bought an aluminum dutch oven. My question is does it need to be seasoned like a cast iron one? If so, how is the best way to do this. I bought one of the hard anodised ones.

caverdan is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 10-06-2010   #2
____________________
 
rwhyman's Avatar
 
Unincorporated Douglas County, Colorado
Paddling Since: 2005
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 967
No seasoning needed. No special treatment. Just wash it like any other cookware. Use a metal spatula to scrap it, if you wish. Heat and a little water works best if something is stuck on. I always put a thin coat of oil on the inside before cooking. I use parchment paper in the bottom if I'm doing cakes or cinnamon rolls.
__________________
Karma is like this: If we set causes in motion the effects come back to us.
rwhyman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2010   #3
 
Jenks, Oklahoma
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 1,723
DO feed back

I am a long time DO cook.

Welcome to the DO club and hopefully you and your floating buds will enjoy lots of good meals from your DO.

Cast Iron DO's are in my opinion, the best cookers out there. But, they weigh a lot, require much more care in washing and storage than the aluminum DO's.

Several years ago, I discovered the GSI hard anodized aluminum DO's.

For river trips, these DO's have become my standby units. Reason being they can be washed and put away just like any cooking utensil. Much easier to carry and store. The hard anodized DO's do not cook for me as well as a well seasoned cast iron DO does, but they come pretty darn close. These days, most all my DO cooking is in the hard anodized GSI units.

For cooking biscuits or cornbread, my all time favorite is cast iron. I can do them in hard anodized DO's but they just do not seem to brown off as well as cast iron.

My experience is regular aluminum works ok on the river, heating control is critical to prevent burning. The hard anodized units seem to hold up better than standard aluminum and at least to me seem to cook better than standard aluminum. Well seasoned cast iron for me seem to cook better, heat up hotter and distribute the heat better.

Prolly more information than you wanted but my experience over a lot of river trips with cakes and entree's from DO's is the GSI Hard Anodized Aluminum DO's are the way to go and I recommend them. Nothing can make a river side dinner as special as setting around the camp fire after dishes are washed enjoying a nice tasty peach cobbler and talking about the day's fun and the fun to come tomorrow.

No special seasoning required for the hard anodized DO's except wash them out and use spray on PAM liberally. I am a big fan of PAM and use it on every dish I cook on my Partner Steel Griddles and GSI DO's. I find that the more I cook with both the Partner Steel and GSI units the better they become. Not sure they actually develop a patina over time or not but I recommend PAM for sure.
okieboater is online now   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 10-06-2010   #4
 
cataraftgirl's Avatar
 
Sandy, Utah
Paddling Since: 1997
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 3,344
I also use the anodized aluminum DOs. Love Them! I carry a 12 in. with a 10 in.(without feet) nested inside. These seem to be the most useful sizes for my group. Both sizes also work great on the stovetop as well. As okieboater mentioned, I also use a liberal coating of nonstick spray when I bake in them, and have never needed to "season" them like cast iron. Whenever I've had a really stuck on mess in one, I just fill it will soapy water and heat it up on the stove. Cleans up nicely with a little scrub. The anodized finish isn't as delicate as teflon, so you can use metal utensils.
We cook in them almost everyday on the river.... breakfast & dinner casseroles, pizza, meat loaf, bread, cakes, cobblers, brownies, cookies...... anything you can bake in an oven, you can adapt to a DO. Yum-O.
For DO accessories we use ..... welders gloves, channel locks, and tongs.
Have fun with your new river kitchen essential.
KJ
cataraftgirl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2010   #5
Dipshit with the most.
 
carvedog's Avatar
 
Bellevue, Idaho
Paddling Since: 1991
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 2,799
after a quick search, I found that Pam makes an Organic cooking spray and an olive oil cooking spray - maybe organic too. I usually never use any spray, occasionally a swipe with butter.

I use my regular old aluminum dutch all the time. Even just in a regular oven - It works great. I do wish I had anodized as the clean up would be easier. I have cast iron too, but don't use it much - it does hold it's temperature longer when you take it off the heat, but the way my crew destroys a DO, that doesn't seem to be much of an issue.

On my last trip, I did a pork roast stuffed with garlic cloves over rice, with some chicken stock added for a little more flavor. One person said it was the best pork they had ever had. Several commented that the rice was fantastic as well. And everyone came for seconds and thirds.

I did the easy part the DO did the rest. We did add some more coals at about 50 minutes to an hour and cooked for another 20 minutes. This would normally be the time to put some broccoli over the top and cook for a great one pot dish, but we had no room in the dutch.
carvedog is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2010   #6
 
Jenks, Oklahoma
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 1,723
yum

CarveDog,

Man that sounds like a great recipe. When did you add the rice (at the beginning or some time later?) Gotta give this one a try.

Have seen brisket cooked in a DO (took most of the afternoon and multiple charcoals) but was awesome.
okieboater is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2010   #7
Dipshit with the most.
 
carvedog's Avatar
 
Bellevue, Idaho
Paddling Since: 1991
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 2,799
Quote:
Originally Posted by okieboater View Post
CarveDog,

Man that sounds like a great recipe. When did you add the rice (at the beginning or some time later?) Gotta give this one a try.

Have seen brisket cooked in a DO (took most of the afternoon and multiple charcoals) but was awesome.
I started it all together but I think I could have waited 20 to 30 minutes to braise the pork roast a bit more and then added the rice. The rice near the bottom was bit mushy. When I do it in the oven at home I am able to hold higher temp for longer - 400 to 450 and it gets done in just over an hour.
I think I used two cups of rice and four of chick stock per dutch for eight people per dutch. For outside I go pretty heavy on the coals.

Also several bay leaves and season the roast with salt and pepper generously. Use boneless loin, shoulder or whatever you want. It all comes out pretty tender. If using a bone in shoulder you have to deal with the bone. For the river I would go boneless. It is awesome.
Hungry now.
carvedog is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2010   #8
____________________
 
rwhyman's Avatar
 
Unincorporated Douglas County, Colorado
Paddling Since: 2005
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 967
On a recent Main trip, I took a long pork loin and cut it in half in order to get it into the DO. I then spiced it up and completely wrapped both pieces with maple bacon. Turned out great! Like Carvedog, added a new load of coals at about 1 hour. I don't remember the total cook time, but maybe 1:20 to 1:30. Used a meat thermometer for doneness. Served with cajun dirty rice and garlic green beans. Carrot cake for dessert.
__________________
Karma is like this: If we set causes in motion the effects come back to us.
rwhyman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2010   #9
 
oarframe's Avatar
 
Gardnerville, Nevada
Paddling Since: 00
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 477
One of the most usefull DO tools I've found in a long time. Fits inside the 10" and weighs next to nothing.


critical when producing things like this
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	P1010101.jpg
Views:	191
Size:	481.8 KB
ID:	2977  
Attached Images
 
oarframe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2010   #10
 
lhowemt's Avatar
 
at my house, Montana
Paddling Since: 2020
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 4,598
Quote:
Originally Posted by oarframe View Post
One of the most usefull DO tools I've found in a long time. Fits inside the 10" and weighs next to nothing.


critical when producing things like this
Where do you find that beauty?
__________________
Living in Montana, boating in Idaho
lhowemt is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Tags
aluminum

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Topic Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Dutch oven: cast iron/pre-seasoned/aluminum Amethyst Farm Kayaking | Gear Talk 19 02-10-2010 09:01 AM
Dutch Oven recipes smittyvwbus The Eddy 26 01-14-2010 07:53 PM
Lost 2 aluminum oars, Browns Jun/27/09 kenblackboater Lost & Found 0 06-28-2009 12:58 PM
Aluminum vs. Steel Chip Kayaking | Gear Talk 18 03-03-2009 09:13 PM
looking for dutch oven recipes bledoux Whitewater Kayaking 10 01-12-2005 09:21 PM

» Classified Ads
Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 12:25 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.