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Old 09-30-2008   #1
 
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Portland, Oregon
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Multiday Gear

I'm prepping for my first multiday trip and I need some recommendations on gear to take... I've got the standard stuff throw bag, pin kit, first aid, ultra light sleeping bag with compression sack, bivy, tarp, but wanted to know what the collective thoughts were on a gear list. FYI, this isn't going to be a gnar trip... mostly class III+ to IV. Also, any good recommendations on cooking stoves... what works, what doesn't.

All information appreciated.

Thanks!

jim

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Old 09-30-2008   #2
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Overnight with a kayak?

It can't be done.
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Old 09-30-2008   #3
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Randaddy View Post
Overnight with a kayak?

It can't be done.
I guess no-one told that to those guys that did a multy overnight on Cherry Creek in Cali!

Or to me when I did week long trips in Alaska, solo! To be fair, on my Alaska adventures, I cached supplies at the halfway point on the fly in.

I used a whisperlite stove, small, light, and boils h2o fast. Plus you can always get white-gas anywhere.
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Old 09-30-2008   #4
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Overnight = cases of beer.

You just did a long day trip with a nap.
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Old 09-30-2008   #5
 
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-you probably don't need both a bivy and a tarp. If you bring a tarp, using a throw rope works well to create better shelters.
-crocs are nice to have at camp; they're light and easy to pack because the material is so flexible.
-wrap duct tape around your paddle shaft, you never know when your going to need it.
- make sure that you have more than one water purification system in your group. if someone swims and you loose your purification systems then your group will be hurting.
-bitchathane is essential, especially if you're using a broken boat (all 7 overnighters I have ever done, have been with broken boats. I wouldn't recommend it; can complicate situations where you are tight on time.)
-if you're going to be in a remote area that is unfamiliar to you then you need a topo map or gps.
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Old 09-30-2008   #6
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Randaddy View Post
Overnight = cases of beer.

You just did a long day trip with a nap.
On lightweight trips you leave the beer home and instead bring the flask. Usually after paddling all day, and ducking bear and moose, you are ready to sleep as soon as you finish eating. That and some local grown will suffice nicely!

Good call on the water purification, I carried a filter and iodine tablets as back up. I would prefilter the water through a cloth before sending it through the filter, that keeps the filter from clogging up as quickly.
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Old 09-30-2008   #7
 
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Shit yes you can overnight with a 'yak. I've done 2-3 day trips in subfreezing weather (in the Winds) with a fanny pack, using an ultralight bag and a bivy sack. The only lack was food— I was usually pretty hungry when I came out.

Cookery takes some thought. There are several small/light stoves, like the 3 oz. Snow Peak and the MSR SuperFly (with an ultralight hanging kit and titanium windscreen available). Get a lightweight cookset that the stove (and/or a gas cartridge) will fit inside. Another compact option (for warmer weather) is a Trangia alcohol burner with their 3-piece windscreen/pot stand— works well for boiling water and heating up soup, stew, Thai noodles, etc. I've tried solid-fuel cookers like the Esbit stove: not recommended.

Whatever you pick, get used to the stove & cookset at home before trusting it on a trip.

The other trick is packing stuff inside larger stuff, so there's no wasted space. Also stowing your gear in the right order so the things you need first are on top, etc.

I enjoy the challenge of ultralight trips and also the relative freedom of movement.

Chip
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Old 09-30-2008   #8
 
Jackson, Wyoming
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Multi-day gear.......

Self-support multi-days are the shit. The MAIN reason to go kayaking, in my book. With that said:
  • Good dry bags that you trust. Otherwise, it's gonna be a miserable trip.
  • I have NEVER carried a stove on a multi-day, especially in the Rockies and Sierras. Unless you're going on some trip where you can't have fires, it and the fuel are are waste of space and weight. You ever been on a river with NO driftwood? Except for the Grand, it's not likely. I use a small aluminum coffee pot with a steel hanging handle (see attached pic). It fits in my stern on the side opposite my drain plug. You can cook just about anything in it except fish, and it boils water fast when hung directly over the fire. The freeze-dried stuff you can buy is pretty tasty, and you can supplement that with fish that you catch, cooked in tinfoil directly in the fire (don't forget the superlight fishing gear, foil and some lemon-pepper). Forget the stove, carry more food and a beer or two, go rustic.
  • I agree with some of the others: a super lightweight tarp rules, stretched over your throwbag line. I have Integral Designs sil-nylon 8x12 and it weighs feathers. Lots of different setup possibilities. Bivy sacks don't weigh any less, and you can't sit under them comfortably in the rain. Heck, if it's an easy trip, though, it's nice to have a super-light tent to keep the bugs out.
  • Super-light rain/wind jacket and pants, to go over any layers of fleece you bring. Really makes a dfference in the warmth factor. I tried sitting around in my drysuit a couple of times on CA trips, and it just sucks being in those gaskets in camp.
  • Ultralight ThermaRest, RidgeRest, etc. Good sleep is key to good paddling the next day. They don't weigh anything, and they don't necessarily need to go inside your dry bags.
  • Drugs, plain and simple. Anything you can get your hands on for your first aid kit that is stronger than over the counter stuff. Percs, Vicodin, Valium, etc. You can reduce almost any dislocated shoulder with a combo of Percocet/Valium (there's a great article on it in the AMA Journal). Sometimes, they can then paddle out. Or, if you're going somewhere where an accident means leaving someone who is injured on a beach while help is reached, pain management can go a long way toward a successful outcome. There are others, but you get the idea.
  • Personal clothing and gear preferences vary a lot. It all depends on how hard the run is and how cold it's gonna get in camp. I've done 15 Box trips, and at least 12 Middle Feathers, trips in Mexico, New Zealand, etc, and the load has varied a little bit every time. The harder the run, any difficult portaging, etc, will really make you consider every ounce that goes in the boat.
  • You'll figure it out, especially starting with less difficult trips first. We had one guy on a Box trip that had never done an overnighter, and he just showed up at the put-in with his boat all packed and ready to go: he brought his hiking boots, a two-man tent, blue jeans, cotton underwear........ At least with all that weight he never got stuck in any big holes, but he sure was slow on the portages.
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Old 09-30-2008   #9
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Where are you going? I'll carry your shit. You buy the beer.

But seriously, you can easily boil water in your nalgene bottle (then boil sealed food, make coffee, etc.) as long as you are diligent and bring a little bailing wire to support it.
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Old 09-30-2008   #10
 
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Good points, the result of experience.

I've got an Integral Designs SIL shelter (shaped tarp) that packs small— kept me dry on the way to Milford Sound, NZ, with rain all night, every night. But for cold weather I like a bivy sac, at times with a teeny little SIL tarp pitched over my head, so I can sit up to read, cook, etc.

For runs where open fires aren't allowed (except in pans) there's a stove that burns driftwood, moose poop, old fire charcoal— whatever.

http://www.zzstove.com

I've got both the original sort and a titanium ultralight. They have a wee fan that runs on AA batteries. I built a little solar battery charger into the lid of a waterproof ditty box— NiMH batteries are the ticket for the stove and a headlamp. Given a bit of sun (it doesn't take much) you could go forever without carrying fuel.

Chip
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