Advice on the double pump to bow stall?? - Mountain Buzz
 

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Old 10-11-2007  
 
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Advice on the double pump to bow stall??

Really working on my double pump to get into a bow stall...any sugestions. I get about 45 degrees out of the water at most.

Obviously more torso rotation and I've done the add water to the boat to practice once your up. But about the double pump. does it help if the forward stroke sweeps all the way to the back with the front paddle blade slightly under water at the end of the stroke to help with the back stroke/low brace portion of the dpump? Or is this one of those things where thinking too much kills it and just keep trying and it will happen?

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Old 10-11-2007  
 
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have fun

make sure you are really pumping, lift your legs as high as you can get them and slam them under your body not just in front of your body. than some rotation and a paddle plant will be all you need. try paddling faster so the water catches your bow as soon as ur about 45 to the surface. than sit it down i mean push your ass out and make sure your initiation angle is correct. have fun.
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Old 10-11-2007  
 
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I had the same problem when I got in a boat that was too big for me and I was fortunate enough to get some good instruction from really good paddlers. The most Important aspects:
1. When you initiate your first stroke on your double pump, think about pulling your stern deep into the water, this will give the pop you need to get you bow under.
2. Make sure that you are leaning far enough over your rail, if you aren't leaning enough, you are trying to push too much surface area of your boat down, the more vertical your bow is to the water, the easier it will enter.
3. probably the most important step is to have both blades flat on the water when you go to throw your bow under. This will rotate your torso and your boat will have to follow directly under you. Also, if you have both blades on the water, there is a better chance that you are far enough over your rail. and your blades will be ready to steady you once you are up.
4. Lastly, think about pushing the nose of your boat down with the up-side foot. so, if you are throwing a bow stall on your right side, you will be pushing your boat through with your left foot.

good luck, bow stalls feel really good when you get them.

check out our video on how to loop.

Kyle Dinnel
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Old 10-11-2007  
 
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I posted on this a while back... here is what I said

Hey, ok I am going to try to help. I have mastered the bow stall pretty well at this point so hopefully I can explain how I learned and it will make sense.

It took me like a year of pool sessions to get it. Guys tried to teach me but as I see it, girls and guys do it completely different.

Guys rotate their center of gravity around the boat to get it to double pump and girls have to rotate their center of gravity and boat by their shoulders. But that doesn't really matter except for the fact if you wanted to you could muscle it. In short...use your abs not your arms.

Make sure you have good edge control.
First go to an edge of a pool and get comfortable double pumping holding on to the side of the pool. Try not to move your body back and forth…it is important to keep your CG in the middle of the boat at all times to even out the bow and stern initiate. Then go away from the pool and double pump using only your abs and use your paddle to brace...this will be evident when your paddle is bracing on the water and your boat is double pumping on its own.

Ok after you are comfy with that fill a boat with water, grab the cockpit (one hand on the front and one on the back of it) and double pump on that. If you use you arms the boat filled with water, will sink. After a while you will be able to double pump into a bow stall on the boat, this will also help you learn to control your boat when in a bow stall...it is super cool.
Then after all of that you are ready to paddle hard and initiate a stall.

Awesome!
Let me know if you have any questions,
Christine
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Old 10-11-2007  
 
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make sure you kiss the water.
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Old 10-11-2007  
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Personally I find this move can be really frustrating when you're having trouble with it. All the suggestions here are good. I really liked the freeze frame sequence at this site: Ken Driscoll: Flatwater Cartwheel. when I was trying to learn. It's for a cartwheel, but obviously a bow stall starts it out.

I first started to get the feel of it when someone told me to bring my paddle all the way to the stern on the forward sweep, but now I don't really find I need to do that. I find throwing your weight forward and body centered were some key points that helped me get it.

Good luck.

Quote:
Originally Posted by gannon_w View Post
Really working on my double pump to get into a bow stall...any sugestions. I get about 45 degrees out of the water at most.

Obviously more torso rotation and I've done the add water to the boat to practice once your up. But about the double pump. does it help if the forward stroke sweeps all the way to the back with the front paddle blade slightly under water at the end of the stroke to help with the back stroke/low brace portion of the dpump? Or is this one of those things where thinking too much kills it and just keep trying and it will happen?
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Old 10-11-2007  
 
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The thing it seems like everyone is forgetting is the most important. The placement of your upper body is crucial. Not only for the bow stall but for the double pump as well. If you are only getting to 45 degrees I would have to assume you are leaning to far forward. You are probly trying to use your body weight to sink the bow. It doesn't work like that. By doing this (leaning forwarding) you are shooting yourself in the foot. When you lean forward you pull your knees to your chest. This kills your angle, in your attempt to get verticle. Your upper body must stay neutral, or even a little back. You need to watch a freestyle video. We can all sit here and type as much as we want. But seeing the explination broken down is key.
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Old 10-11-2007  
 
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Tons of good advice above.

As far as the initiation goes, it is key to have the paddle completely flat against the surface of the water. As a general rule, if I am going to throw a series of cartwheels I put my knuckles on the surface of the water. If I am going for a bow stall, when i first initiate I bury my paddle/hands so that the surface of the water is at my wrists. The torso windup and body positioning is the same, but it is much easier to get to a stable position fast.

Something to think about.

Note: If you find yourself spinning and landing on your head when you try to initiate, then only your back blade is in the water, and your paddle isn't flat to the surface.
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Old 10-14-2007  
 
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Quote:
Note: If you find yourself spinning and landing on your head when you try to initiate, then only your back blade is in the water, and your paddle isn't flat to the surface
Or you weight is to far out from the boat. You really need to be able to hold an edge with your weight over the boat, so when you lift the out side edge you are doing a side crunch.
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Old 10-14-2007  
Mut
 
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TheKid,

Its funny how certain advise for certain people really makes things click. I have been able to bow stall for a while but it is always really hard for me to initiate. Yesterday I was out and tried sitting just a little back. The nose went in so easy I was catching me off guard and I was going over vert. The best thing is that my old bow stalls took so much effort that my body would hurt after a few. Yesterday I must have done 30 with little effort. Thanks for the tips (even though they weren't directed at me).
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