Attention all Dolores Runners - Mountain Buzz
 



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Old 3 Weeks Ago   #1
 
Carbondale, Colorado
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 79
Attention all Dolores Runners

It's been said before, but bears repeating as the as the frenzy builds:

Be good stewards and representatives of the river running community, and, maybe even more importantly:
SPEND MONEY!

We want the locals to see a benefit to their communities in using this water for something other than growing beans in the desert. They will have a much better chance than us of being heard by the powers that be, if they start demanding more reliable releases, to keep the river folk coming, because we are a boon to the community.
Buy some food, snacks, beer, gas. Even if you could get it cheaper by waiting until you're back on I-70. Think of it as your lottery/permit fees for this particular trip.

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Old 3 Weeks Ago   #2
 
Pagosa Springs, Colorado
Paddling Since: 1987
Join Date: Oct 2003
Posts: 148
Great !! I like the way you think.
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Any Day on the River is Better Than----
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Old 3 Weeks Ago   #3
 
missoula, montucky
Paddling Since: 1993
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 38
Speaking of permit fees---

Hey friends!!!
In lieu of a permit fee consider donating to the Dolores River Boating Advocates (Dolores River Boating Advocates). I'm new to the Dolores as well as the politics surrounding the lack of water in its glorious channel, but it seems those folks at DRBA are doing great work that we're all benefiting from this season.

This on top of supporting local businesses in the area of course.

ain't no time like river time.....
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Old 3 Weeks Ago   #4
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Gonzorango, Colorado
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 220
Dryland Beans Good - Alfalfa Bad

Buy some pinto beans in Dove Creek to eat on the river as celebration this year. Buy extra beans to help keep dryland farming limping along until after cavitation takes down McPhee Dam after a warm April rain in a big snow year. Stay in the Paradox Inn as a Bedrock layover. Explain river life to folks at the Gateway Inn when you smell up the place getting lunch on the way home (or better, as a shore lunch heading on down to Moab).

Do a bit of research to make sure dollars are going toward good folks and post good and bad experiences here so we can know who to support and who to avoid.

Know the history before casting blame and steering dollars away from the bean farmers who fought the dam alongside boaters and greens. Get last-minute boating gear in Dolores or Cortez or Durango.

Among the correct people to blame for damning the Dolores - water hoarders, alfalfa farmers, welfare ranchers, Dolores Water Conservancy District, Bureau of WrecktheNation, Southwest Water Conservancy District. "You have to understand, these people are the salt of the earth. The common clay. You know -- morons."

Excerpt from an NPS online book that is worth printing to share in camp.
https://www.nps.gov/parkhistory/onli...rows/chap2.htm
Dryland farming enthusiasm resulted in the introduction of two important cash crops, pinto beans and potatoes which increased the variety of cultivation within the Valley. Pinto beans yielded a high return and could be grown without irrigation. [24] The beans were planted in June and harvested between September and October. Neighbors assisted one another in the harvesting process.
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Old 3 Weeks Ago   #5
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Gonzorango, Colorado
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 220
Dove Creek Bean Farmers – Edible Southwest Colorado






"Growing dryland beans is a clever business. Farmers can easily save their own seed. There are no costs in irrigation equipment, labor, or the water itself. Dry beans store and ship well. And, bonus: the bean plant, in the legume family, creates its own fertility via bacteria that attach to legume roots and convert airborne nitrogen to a usable form for the plant. When the beans are harvested, stalks left on the soil surface add nitrogen, an essential plant nutrient, to the soil. This is one reason most dryland bean farmers don’t use fertilizer. Other reasons: adding fertilizer to dry ground burns plants, farmers rotate beans with winter wheat (the stubble of which, left on the fields after harvest, adds nutrients), and many Dove Creek bean farmers are certified organic and can’t use typically available fertilizers.
"And yet, this clever business may be a dying business. “When I was a kid, there was a farmer on every 320 acres,” Dan Warren says. Warren is a third generation dryland bean farmer with 3000 acres. Now, most farmers operate at least 1000 acres to make a modest living. Rhonda Waschke, who farms with her husband, Billy, remembers when harvesting four to five 100-pound sacks of beans per acre used to indicate a poor year. “Now you get that, you think you’re in heaven.”"
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Old 3 Weeks Ago   #6
 
Laradise, Wyo
Paddling Since: 2010
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 47
Interesting article, thanks for the link. Are dryland bean farmers thinking of using irrigation in the future as insurance for dry years? seems like that would be a solution for them unless it's entirely not economical to do so. They also probably don't have senior water rights even though beans have been farmed in that region far longer than alfalfa.

I will be happy to buy a bag of beans from Adobe Mills while down in SW Co running the Dolores this year. Can't wait!
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Old 3 Weeks Ago   #7
 
Cortez, Colorado
Paddling Since: 2007
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 168
Quote:
Originally Posted by Droboat View Post
Buy some pinto beans in Dove Creek to eat on the river as celebration this year. Buy extra beans to help keep dryland farming limping along until after cavitation takes down McPhee Dam after a warm April rain in a big snow year. Stay in the Paradox Inn as a Bedrock layover. Explain river life to folks at the Gateway Inn when you smell up the place getting lunch on the way home (or better, as a shore lunch heading on down to Moab).

Do a bit of research to make sure dollars are going toward good folks and post good and bad experiences here so we can know who to support and who to avoid.

Know the history before casting blame and steering dollars away from the bean farmers who fought the dam alongside boaters and greens. Get last-minute boating gear in Dolores or Cortez or Durango.

Among the correct people to blame for damning the Dolores - water hoarders, alfalfa farmers, welfare ranchers, Dolores Water Conservancy District, Bureau of WrecktheNation, Southwest Water Conservancy District. "You have to understand, these people are the salt of the earth. The common clay. You know -- morons."

Excerpt from an NPS online book that is worth printing to share in camp.
https://www.nps.gov/parkhistory/onli...rows/chap2.htm
Dryland farming enthusiasm resulted in the introduction of two important cash crops, pinto beans and potatoes which increased the variety of cultivation within the Valley. Pinto beans yielded a high return and could be grown without irrigation. [24] The beans were planted in June and harvested between September and October. Neighbors assisted one another in the harvesting process.
Great post - thanks!
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Old 3 Weeks Ago   #8
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Gonzorango, Colorado
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 220
Kirks asked: "Are dryland bean farmers thinking of using irrigation in the future as insurance for dry years?"
Don't know, would think no. Ask folks in Dove Creek and let us know how to keep them from using irrigation crack.

The reason most bean farmers opposed McPhee is they couldn't afford to buy into the Soviet Style federal water and land grab and redistribution project. Even the name sounds miserably Soviet - The Dolores Project.

Bean margins were too slim in the 1980s to pay for water - I expect the same is true now. Lots of unallocated water in the system though, so Dolores District Paranoiacs might try to peddle excess water through any means: Just try it, you'll love it for a couple years (until it bankrupts or kills you).
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Old 3 Weeks Ago   #9
 
Bayfield, Colorado
Paddling Since: 1980
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 125
Yeah, its interesting the whole money thing. Last year I got a flat on my trailer when camped at Bradfield bridge. No biggie, take the tire off, drop it off when doing the shuttle, pick it up on the way back. Amazingly it all worked seamlessly. Tried to give a few extra bucks as a tip and the guy looked at me like I was an alien. Pretty simple, give the extra to the guy that busted the tire. Its not like I'm going to stop trying to give them money, but what is up with that. Also I'd like to give a big shout out to DRBA. They have increased the level of communication between the water district and the rest of us which is huge. We know (sort of) whats going to happen. My big dream is that eventually that the Dolores will be run like the Chama. We'll up it to 1200 on friday and shut it down monday morning. Whats not to like about that scenario happening untill the end of June...July. Oh wait I'm dreaming. Play nice and tip well is my evil plan.
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Old 3 Weeks Ago   #10
CBrow
 
Norwood, Colorado
Paddling Since: 1978
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 40
I like the idea of managing the Dolores similar to the Chama. Set release days over a 3 to 4 day period every weekend during the Spring and early summer could extend a season of runnable water for a couple of months instead of the week or 2 we currently get, if any at all.
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