Repeat of the drought of 2000-05 Could drain Lake Powell - Page 2 - Mountain Buzz
 



Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 09-05-2016   #11
Misspellingintothefuture!
 
mattman's Avatar
 
Fraser, Colorado
Paddling Since: 2000
Join Date: Jan 2015
Posts: 1,162
The part about the methane got me thinking though, if we could somehow bottle those cow farts, and use them as a renewable fuel, maybe put a cap on old Besey's ass?....

__________________
-Matt Man
"one Iliterate son of a bitch"
mattman is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 09-05-2016   #12
 
Redmond, Oregon
Paddling Since: 1973
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 1,074
Almonds use about 10 percent of California’s agricultural water supply. (probably somewhere between 8 and 11 percent anyway)

The California almond industry has doubled its acreage since 2005.

California has a climate that is one of the best for almonds.

Is almond farming compatible with climate change?


==========

Other things we need to give up:
108 gallons of water per gallon of brewed tea.
Coffee requires almost 10 times as much water as tea, using 1,056 gallons of water per gallon of brewed coffee.
Beer at 296 gallons of water per gallon of beer
872 gallons of water to produce 1 gallon of wine
Chicken at 518 gallons of water per pound
Beef requires the most water, at 1,847 gal./lb

almonds take more, averaging 1,929 gal./lb
worse than friggin beef.

This Is How Much Water It Takes To Make Your Favorite Foods

=========

Pretty simple.
No more coffee, wine, beef or almonds if you care.
BilloutWest is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-05-2016   #13
 
Redmond, Oregon
Paddling Since: 1973
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 1,074
A brief side rant.

I hate bottled water.
We filter our own. (GE)
Use non BPA REI containers.

===============

50 billion (mostly plastic) bottles we throw away every year.
Drilling for oil to make that plastic
The bottled water industry says they only use 1.4 liters of water to make 1 liter of product.
But they don't include water needed to make plastic.
(edit: Has anyone noticed how much water is thrown away inside partially consumed water bottles?)
============

I also don't drink coffee and purchase fast food about once a year, if that.

I take pride in producing less garbage and throwing away less food than almost anyone reading this.
BUT.
We have grass fed beef in the freezer and we just ordered half a pig.(pork at 718 gal./lb)
We made 4 1/2 gallons of Ice Cream yesterday. (I'm scared to look all those ingredients up.)

So in the end I'm just as bad as every other American.
You can't do just some things right.
BilloutWest is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-05-2016   #14
 
cedar city, Utah
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 2,013
The most robustly supported (standadized, large international data set) # I have seen is closer to 1,800 gallons per lb of beef. 25% less but still a huge footprint compared to other foods.

Encouraging personal change is paramount. I know my wife and I rarely eat beef for ecological and cost reasons. That said, when it comes to conversations about infrastructure of water in the west it's more germane to talk about what can actually be regulated. In this case that is commercial agriculture. It's not possible to directly regulate individual consumption though I think commercial regulation can indirectly change behavior.

Going after agricultural practices also has the added benefit of reducing beef's footprint as their dietary consumption of Ag products in feedlots is a huge component of that #.
restrac2000 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-05-2016   #15
 
Redmond, Oregon
Paddling Since: 1973
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 1,074
Quote:
Originally Posted by restrac2000 View Post
That said, when it comes to conversations about infrastructure of water in the west it's more germane to talk about what can actually be regulated. In this case that is commercial agriculture. It's not possible to directly regulate individual consumption though I think commercial regulation can indirectly change behavior.
Why not home use also regulated by the same fee structure as golf courses and ag fields. Water meters at every home too. I suspect Cal is already mostly there on that one.

Charge everyone the same. Be fair.

Make it a lot.
Earn some bucks to cover canals.
ENCOURAGE conservation everywhere.
BilloutWest is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-05-2016   #16
 
cedar city, Utah
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 2,013
I support a "progressive" fee structure. Extremely cheap up to a threshold deemed necessary for day-to-day necessities and then scaled to functionally penalize elective to ecological unsustainable levels. I also support the positive incentives organizations like the extension service do to encourage reduction. Our local service reimburses a large percentage to remove non-native grasses and replace with xeroscaped natives. At some point I think we will need to restrict western developers from anything other than xeroscaping. Other options are just unsustainable in our climate and environments.
restrac2000 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-05-2016   #17
 
flite's Avatar
 
steamboat springs, Colorado
Paddling Since: 09
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 50
"I take pride in producing less garbage and throwing away less food than almost anyone reading this."-billoutwest[/QUOTE]

This is a good point to add. I work in the food service industry and a big struggle for me is the food waste.

Americans throw away enough food every day to fill a foot ball stadium. Not only is it unfortunate that we waste all this food but also the resources used to grow and transport it around the globe. And where does all that waste end up?....landfills. Even if we compost this waste the incredible amount of resources, like water, used to get to that point are lost.
flite is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-05-2016   #18
 
Redmond, Oregon
Paddling Since: 1973
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 1,074
Quote:
Originally Posted by flite View Post
"I take pride in producing less garbage and throwing away less food than almost anyone reading this."-billoutwest
Quote:
This is a good point to add. ................
Thanks.

Now here is a bad point to make.

Bottom line, in the State of California anyway, is going to have to cut back on farm/ag water. That means to a degree cutting back on some of those industries.

The Governors signature awaits a farm labor bill that would start in 2019 on a four year phase in of fair labor rules for farm workers. Overtime over 40 hrs and OT for over 8 hrs in any day. Same rules most management non-salaried or non-farm employees have anywhere in the US.

That great idea will up our food costs and/or take some production elsewhere. This sort of thing will make the US less self sufficient.
Especially when combined with expensive water.

Hey, I'm still for both.
But manure happens.
BilloutWest is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-05-2016   #19
 
cedar city, Utah
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 2,013
I was proud to read that several American chefs are challenging the "only work with the best ingredients" mantra. Specifically they are critiquing the amount of agricultural waste that is tossed because of appearance. Restaurants and grocery stores are horrible about this behavior. Add to it the amount of vegetable matter we toss since we often only use select portions of it.

Interesting development. Small proportionally to other form of inefficiencies and waste but with the human population the size it is, anything helps.
restrac2000 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-05-2016   #20
 
Redmond, Oregon
Paddling Since: 1973
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 1,074
Quote:
A single restaurant in the U.S. wastes about 100,000 pounds of food a year, according to the Green Restaurant Association
Quote:
There is no available public record of anyone in the United States being sued ― or having to pay damages ― because of harms related to donated food, according to Nicole Civita, a professor and director of the Food Recovery Project .......
Quote:
In 1996, Congress passed the Bill Emerson Good Samaritan Food Donation Act (“Bill Emerson Act”) to address these issues. The Bill Emerson Act reduces potential donor liability and solves the problems created by a patchwork of various state laws through partial preemption. It also enables and encourages food recovery to help those that are food insecure.
========

Quote:
“Chefs do not like to throw food away.”
Quote:
In December 2015 Congress passed and President Obama signed into law a provision long supported by the National Restaurant Association. This change permanently extends the enhanced deduction for charitable contributions of food inventory .......
Red Lobster, Olive Garden, LongHorn Steakhouse and Bahama Breeze plus a few other major chains give daily. Directly to 'soup kitchens'.
If you find a restaurant that you like that does this, do business there rather than those who don't.
BilloutWest is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Topic Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
To drain, or not to drain? mikesee Whitewater Rafting 69 03-16-2016 03:25 PM
to drain or not to drain t up Whitewater Kayaking 79 05-27-2012 10:15 PM
Cooler meltwater: to drain or not to drain ridecats Kayaking | Gear Talk 42 09-24-2009 05:34 PM
Central and South American Boating (repeat posting) st2eelpot Kayaking | Trip Planner 2 11-29-2008 10:46 AM

» Classified Ads
Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 06:45 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.