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Old 01-09-2017   #11
 
Western Slope, Colorado
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That oarsmen on the Truckee just calmly parks his oar, takes a healthy shot of some whiskey for the audience and does a graceful exit. Love it.

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Old 01-09-2017   #12
 
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So, while there's been a lot of Cali coast and Sierra rain and snow, is it correct that the total amount so far, knowing more is on the way, is less than some of the earliest predictions, such as one newscasters comment on 5 - 10 feet of snow? Where did the Souht Fork of the American end up?
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Old 01-09-2017   #13
 
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I got on the lower-t at 13-15000 on Saturday. It was a bit much. https://photos.google.com/photo/AF1Q...UTY6rLOoTCxydf
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Old 01-09-2017   #14
 
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NERD ALERT! You would think that with all this rain and snow that has come in California this heavy rainy season that every reservoir in the state would be overflowing. This is not the case yet. California built some big reservoirs in the last 100 years. And none of the top ten largest are full. Take Don Pedro for example, it is just about 80% full. And there is still about 400,000 acre feet of volume left (AF). You could drain all three upstream reservoirs (Cherry, Hetch Hetchy, and Lake Elenor) and then it would be full. As of today's flow data the states top ten reservoirs are 63% full. With 7,216,906 AF of additional volume. That is enough water to fill both Shast (the state's largest reservoir) and Don Pedro from empty to full.https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets...gid=1302994285
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Old 01-09-2017   #15
 
San Jose, CA, California
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Originally Posted by duct tape View Post
So, while there's been a lot of Cali coast and Sierra rain and snow, is it correct that the total amount so far, knowing more is on the way, is less than some of the earliest predictions, such as one newscasters comment on 5 - 10 feet of snow? Where did the Souht Fork of the American end up?
Lower than forecast about 30,000cfs this morning at Chili Bar.
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Old 01-10-2017   #16
 
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Originally Posted by duct tape View Post
So, while there's been a lot of Cali coast and Sierra rain and snow, is it correct that the total amount so far, knowing more is on the way, is less than some of the earliest predictions, such as one newscasters comment on 5 - 10 feet of snow? Where did the Souht Fork of the American end up?
My understanding is the storm was very warm, much less snow fell than rain, and a lot of the existing snowpack was melted by the warmer rains. And that upcoming storms will be colder and bring more snow.

-AH
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Old 01-10-2017   #17
 
Searching for water....., Idaho
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Originally Posted by fourtyfloater View Post
That oarsmen on the Truckee just calmly parks his oar, takes a healthy shot of some whiskey for the audience and does a graceful exit. Love it.
Very reckless behavior.

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Originally Posted by buckmanriver View Post
NERD ALERT! You would think that with all this rain and snow that has come in California this heavy rainy season that every reservoir in the state would be overflowing. This is not the case yet. California built some big reservoirs in the last 100 years. And none of the top ten largest are full. Take Don Pedro for example, it is just about 80% full. And there is still about 400,000 acre feet of volume left (AF). You could drain all three upstream reservoirs (Cherry, Hetch Hetchy, and Lake Elenor) and then it would be full. As of today's flow data the states top ten reservoirs are 63% full. With 7,216,906 AF of additional volume. That is enough water to fill both Shast (the state's largest reservoir) and Don Pedro from empty to full.https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets...gid=1302994285
They never let the reservoirs fill up in the winter. They have to consider the amount of water "stored" in the contributing basin and manage the runoff. If they filled up to 100% they would be in big trouble during the next event with no capacity to attenuate the flow, which leads to major flooding. Although this storm was warm, the remaining snow pack is saturated. If it gets cold and stays cold there is a substantial amount of water remaining for spring.
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Old 01-10-2017   #18
 
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NERD ALERT! (cut for brevity)... And none of the top ten largest are full. Take Don Pedro for example, it is just about 80% full. And there is still about 400,000 acre feet of volume left (AF). You could drain all three upstream reservoirs (Cherry, Hetch Hetchy, and Lake Elenor) and then it would be full. (also cut for brevity)
FWIW, 400,000 acre-feet is approximately the annual flow through of our local aquifer/river system here in the Gallatin Valley. That really does illustrate how low things were getting over there. An entire years worth of precipitation for a basin the extends from Yellowstone National Park to north and west of Bozeman - approximately 1795 square miles. Wow. That impresses/scares me!
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Old 01-10-2017   #19
 
San Jose, CA, California
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They never let the reservoirs fill up in the winter.
This is a bit of a generalization - oversimplification of water management in California during the winter season.

Yes, one key benefit of reservoirs is that they help abate flooding through river flow control and if they are filled they can not do that. As is such water managers have outflow requirements. Example Folsom Resivor can not exceed 60% capacity before April, first of the water year. All extra is released through outflow into the delta. Hints it was releasing 30,000cfs over the weekend.


However, none of the states top ten, however, had outflows that high.

Take New Melones Lake at 29% volume for example, yesterday its outflow was 29cfs and its in flow was ~24000cfs.
http://cdec.water.ca.gov/cgi-progs/queryDaily?NML

The data suggest they are trying to fill New Melones up in the winter.

Lastly, the scale of these top 10 reservoirs can be hard to quantfy. Attached is a photo of New Melones from November 2015. Note the kayakers under the old small bridge. It was so low then that the camp 9 run on the Stanislaus river arose from the empty basin once again.

Cheers' ~ B
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Old 01-10-2017   #20
 
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This is a bit of a generalization - oversimplification of water management in California during the winter season.

Cheers' ~ B
Hence the rest of my statement, which I think was right in line with yours?

Luckily, these days, they are getting much better with their modeling so can better anticipate the water (if they have any) in storage. Each year the models become more complex and are given more data for calibration so they are that much more accurate.

I think blanket rules, such as used in Folsom, will become a thing of the past. With proper management we can hopefully manage the water so it maximizes the storage, and future use, available. Folsom has been scared since it almost failed so has spent close to $1B to build the auxiliary spillway.

Until we have had time and resources to model every basin and have resources to gather the real time data, we will continue using over simplified generalizations.
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